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  1. #1
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    Hunt Aero Light Disc Road or Prowheelbuilder AC build

    I just picked up a new road bike that uses disc brakes and the stock wheelset is around (probably over 2000g).

    I was looking around at different wheels - and I'm narrowing down to these two:

    Hunt Aero Light -

    https://www.huntbikewheels.com/produ...ant=7931401859

    24 spokes front/rear, 1449g and would cost about $620 shipped to me.

    My other choice was a custom set from prowheelbuilder.com with American classic rims and hubs and sapim laser spokes, at 32 spokes front/rear, weight about 1420g and would cost $760 shipped to me.

    Looking for some input - the hunt wheels are a bit of an unknown here but seem to have a pretty solid rep in the UK and they're about $140 less. The AC build is lighter but I'm not sure if the AC hub issues from 5-10 year ago have been resolved.
    Swim away fugu fish, swim away!

  2. #2
    Adorable Furry Hombre
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    Quote Originally Posted by Charlie the Unicorn View Post
    I just picked up a new road bike that uses disc brakes and the stock wheelset is around (probably over 2000g).

    I was looking around at different wheels - and I'm narrowing down to these two:

    Hunt Aero Light -

    https://www.huntbikewheels.com/produ...ant=7931401859

    24 spokes front/rear, 1449g and would cost about $620 shipped to me.

    My other choice was a custom set from prowheelbuilder.com with American classic rims and hubs and sapim laser spokes, at 32 spokes front/rear, weight about 1420g and would cost $760 shipped to me.

    Looking for some input - the hunt wheels are a bit of an unknown here but seem to have a pretty solid rep in the UK and they're about $140 less. The AC build is lighter but I'm not sure if the AC hub issues from 5-10 year ago have been resolved.

    You weighed the wheels? Did you completely strip them of everything before weighing them? Manufacturers weights don't include ~250gram of cassette, 5 gram for cassette lockring, ~50 grams of rim tape, whatever your rotors or your lockrings-for-rotors or your QR/thru-axle. And of course 250 gram or so per tire and tube, let's say. Strap all that stuff onto a 1400gram wheelset-and it too would weigh over 2KG.

    Prowheelbuilder can do some nice builds...the one thing the Am Classic hubs have going for them is that they are light...but IMHO that is it.
    "‘Photograph me on horseback,’ wrote Teddy Roosevelt in 1908. ‘Tennis, no. And golf is fatal.’ "

  3. #3
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marc View Post
    You weighed the wheels? Did you completely strip them of everything before weighing them? Manufacturers weights don't include ~250gram of cassette, 5 gram for cassette lockring, ~50 grams of rim tape, whatever your rotors or your lockrings-for-rotors or your QR/thru-axle. And of course 250 gram or so per tire and tube, let's say. Strap all that stuff onto a 1400gram wheelset-and it too would weigh over 2KG.

    Prowheelbuilder can do some nice builds...the one thing the Am Classic hubs have going for them is that they are light...but IMHO that is it.
    I'm going to ignore the part about all the extra stuff. I've been building up my own bikes for years now - the stock wheels are pigs - all by themselves without accounting for everything else.

    AC hubs are light and that's it. This is of absolutely no help.
    Last edited by Charlie the Unicorn; 04-15-2017 at 09:44 AM.
    Swim away fugu fish, swim away!

  4. #4
    Is it the future yet?
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    You weighed the wheels? Did you completely strip them of everything before weighing them? Manufacturers weights don't include ~250gram of cassette, 5 gram for cassette lockring, ~50 grams of rim tape, whatever your rotors or your lockrings-for-rotors or your QR/thru-axle. And of course 250 gram or so per tire and tube, let's say. Strap all that stuff onto a 1400gram wheelset-and it too would weigh over 2KG.
    Yeah what the hell does this ^ have to do with anything? You forgot to add what he ate before hand and if he's using a sports drink or just water because everybody knows that anything other than just water is gonna be heavier...Did you wash those gloves before your ride? That extra dirt and oil is gonna add weight....


    To the OP, I'm in the same boat. I'm leaning toward the Hunts. They seem to get excellent reviews and they are priced very well. The only thing I'm worried about is that I'm in the States so I'm S.O.L. for warranty work.

    Sorry I can't post a review for you, but if you get some, please post your thoughts.

  5. #5
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    Have you considered building your own? I've been mulling about this 24/28 spoke approach:

    Item Part W Q W (tot) Cost
    Front Rim EIE AR38C01 420 1 420 185
    Back Rim EIE AR50C01 460 1 460 185
    Spokes Sapim CX-Ray 4.3 52 223.6 135.2
    Spoke Washers Sapim 0.2 52 10.4 9
    Spoke Nipples Sapim Alloy Hexagonal 0.37 52 19.24 18.2
    Front Hub Novatec D411SB 91 1 91 35
    Rear Hub Novatec D412SB 232 1 232 100
    Valve Stems Alloy 6 2 12 15
    Rim Tape Kapton 10 1 10 0
    1478.24 682.4

    I've already built an EIE-based wheelset, so I'm confident in the rim selection. Haven't tried the Novatec hubs. Very competitive weight though. The carbon centerlock versions would shave another 30g or so.

    The only problem with the Hunt set is that there's not much aero to a 28mm profile. If I wanted something that short, I'd go the other way and assemble a 1350g-ish climbing wheelset.

  6. #6
    My other bike has knobbys
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    Charlie,

    I was kinda in the same boat, but at the other end of the spectrum. For me it was Hunt Aero SuperDuras or a PWB custom build.

    In my case, I went PWB and got 30 mm deep Boyd Altamonts built on custom Onyx hubs. I'll admit that the process with PWB wasn't without glitches (partly due to the custom work on the hubs....something that Onyx offers at the same price, but threw a wrench in PWB's "stock" ordering system), but the customer service was really good with PWB. When Richard from PWB realized the oops, he gave me a call and was up-front about what happened. Then he worked with me (and Onyx) to get my truly custom wheels exactly the way I wanted them and get the ordering error fixed as soon as possible.

    The Hunts were tempting, but the potential for something proprietary and concerns over time/cost to get warranty work was a concern....plus the opportunity to go full custom (right down to custom engraved hubs of a type you just don't see locally) was hard to ignore ;)
    So 8 times wasn't enough and I'm going back again:my participant page for the 2017 Alberta Ride to Conquer Cancer.

    12 Cervelo S2, 09 Knolly Delirium T, ?? Mercury Road Bike, signed '06 Gary Fisher Cake 2DLX

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by alexdi View Post
    The only problem with the Hunt set is that there's not much aero to a 28mm profile.
    In comparison to what, and based on what info? Reasonably well-shaped 28mm +/- wheels have been conclusively shown to be within very very close reach of benchmark 45mm depth wheels. I don't know much of anything about the Hunt wheels in question, but a blanket statement that there's any sort of big aerodynamic difference in that range isn't valid.

    Assembling a 1350g disc wheel set, on the other hand, is fairly challenging. You need really light hubs ($600 Carbon Ti straight pulls do well) and light rims (DT411s do nicely there) and spokes (take your pick) and you'll be ~ 1400g and ~$950 there, but that's a nice light disc set.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by November Dave View Post
    Reasonably well-shaped 28mm +/- wheels have been conclusively shown to be within very very close reach of benchmark 45mm depth wheels.
    I'd actually like to see this study for my own edification. A deeper profile should be more aero in some conditions. Which conditions, and whether they represent reality, I'm not so sure. There's not a lot of testing consistency even within the brands that emphasize this.

    At lower profiles, I see very few carbon rims lighter than the RR411. Do you think the additional lateral stiffness of carbon is relevant for someone who doesn't spend much time out of the saddle?

  9. #9
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    November Bicycles: Race smart. - November Bicycles Blog - Wind Tunnel Testing the Al33, XR31T(FSW3), and otherÂ*alloys

    November Bicycles: Race smart. - November Bicycles Blog - Wind Tunnel Testing the Al33, XR31T(FSW3), and others, PartÂ*2

    Yes, of course, there are a million different ways to argue with this or whatever. But find me one that substantively rebuts this. I'll do some of that homework for you and post this YouTube link. There are a few notable things about this video.
    1. The "baseline" wheel set is a Mavic R-Sys, widely known to be more or less the least aerodynamic wheel set ever. So don't take my saying that the differences between "the best" and "the worst" don't exist - it's just that the difference between "pretty good" and "the best" isn't that huge, and "pretty good" is pretty easy to achieve. There are some real dogs out there, the R-Sys is one of them.
    2. The wheel brand on whose web site I became aware of this video sells generic carbon wheels. They post this video as proxy proof that their wheels will give you the scale of benefits expressed in the video, but they show absolutely no test data specific to their wheels. That's a huge fail.
    3. The Enve 4.5 that represents "pretty good" in this test has been shown to be relatively close (splitting hairs range) to the 303 used as the baseline in the test on our site.
    4. Unless you are in a TT, you simply aren't using a 3 spoke front and disc rear. You aren't even allowed to in a mass start race. And though I've seen some wild stuff out there on the roads, I've never seen anyone just riding around on that kind of a setup.

    The simple thing is that it benefits almost no wheel company for the story of relatively good mid-depth-to-deep alloys being within range of good mid-depth-and-even-deeper carbons (note that what I call a mid-depth-to-deep alloy is ~15mm shallower than what I call a mid-depth carbon) to get out there. They'd all rather you buy more expensive, higher margin carbon wheels, which are easier to differentiate and carry this mystique that they're that much better (which the media is generally quite willing to reinforce).

    Carbon is not automatically stiffer. An original version Pacenti SL23, for example, is significantly stiffer, just as a rim, than an original version Enve 3.4 rim (that's just one pairing that I remember having tested). So there's a popular fallacy there, too. Stiff rims are stiff rims, whether carbon or alloy. Both exist. And as long as the wheel (any wheel) is spoked adequately and built correctly, it will be stiff enough.

  10. #10
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    Thanks for the links. If I'm reading correctly, at 30 MPH, a Zip 303 saves 5-8W 20% of the time relative to the Kinlin alloy. (And loses a bit the rest of the time.) You're also implying that in absence of data, you can't infer much at all about a rim's aero performance. The Mavic's distinguishing feature is a flat spoke bed. Maybe it's sufficient just to avoid that.

  11. #11
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    Close enough on the the 20% thing, yup. If you distribute it out on the "mythical 40k TT" construct, they're even to within millimeters after 40k.

    As to why the Mavic is bad, it's never just one thing. It's also only 24mm deep (so almost 30% shallower than the Kinlin and ~20% shallower than a 28mm rim), it's narrower, and it has those thick round spokes. When we measured round v bladed spokes, a 1.5mm middle section Laser was 1w slower than a CX Ray. When FLO did a similar test, I think they showed a 5w difference. The difference there is that they used a 2mm straight gauge spoke. So spokes make a difference. The Velocity A23 was a laggard when we tested it however many years ago. It's shallow, but not very narrow, and doesn't have a flat spoke bed.

    The Tour Magazine test from their issue 8 (I think) from 2016 is worth getting. You have to download it to see it, but it's worth the few bucks. They covered from a non-R-Sys Ksyrium to a 404 in 13w in their test, and there were A LOT of things that were within 4 or 5w of the 404. The Kinlin XC279 was in that test and did quite well.

    It's never just one thing. Ever.

  12. #12
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    The only copy of that magazine I can find is in German. Tour's international site is down. I did find some screencaps:

    Tour Magazine 2016 Aero Road Bike Test

    There doesn't appear to be much on wheels. Maybe this is the wrong issue. Apropos to bikes, though, it's encouraging to see that the best aero frame in existence was less than 2% quicker than generic round tubing.

    Some other interesting stuff here:

    Aeroweenie.com - Aero Data Compendium

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