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Thread: Industry Nine

  1. #1
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    Industry Nine

    Does anyone own a set of Industry Nine i30 wheels? I haven't found any reviews since they switched over to CX-Ray spokes over their proprietary aluminum spokes. Just curious what your thoughts are?

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    noob roadie :)
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew L View Post
    Does anyone own a set of Industry Nine i30 wheels? I haven't found any reviews since they switched over to CX-Ray spokes over their proprietary aluminum spokes. Just curious what your thoughts are?
    I had the first generation with the aluminum spokes and the spokes just kept breaking. I9 was nice enough to update my wheelset to their new one for a extremely good price.

    So far, the Sapim CX ray spokes are holding up perfectly, and the wheelset is definitely one of my favouriate to date The customer service from I9 is also excellent, so I'm extremely satisfied with their product.

  3. #3
    'brifter' is a lame word.
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    i don't know about the spokes, but i had a customer bring in a hub that needed new bearings. i've replaced bearings in just about everything and this hub was a complete nightmare. the pawls are held in by tiny...really tiny...allen head bolts. they need a .050" (yes, you read that right) allen wrench. there are 6 of them...i could only get 2 undone w/o striping the head of the bolt. that meant i could not replace one of the worn bearings. in my opinion, completely over-engineered, and not service friendly at all. if anyone has any other opinions/experiences, please...let me hear them. otherwise i'll hate these things forever.
    i work for some bike racers...
    2013 Trek Madone 5.9 w/ '12 SRAM Red
    2010 Cervelo T1 sprint bike
    Ruger 10-22TD
    Smith&Wesson M&P 15-22
    Smith&Wesson M&P 9
    oh, those belong in another forum

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    Quote Originally Posted by cxwrench View Post
    i don't know about the spokes, but i had a customer bring in a hub that needed new bearings. i've replaced bearings in just about everything and this hub was a complete nightmare. the pawls are held in by tiny...really tiny...allen head bolts. they need a .050" (yes, you read that right) allen wrench. there are 6 of them...i could only get 2 undone w/o striping the head of the bolt. that meant i could not replace one of the worn bearings. in my opinion, completely over-engineered, and not service friendly at all. if anyone has any other opinions/experiences, please...let me hear them. otherwise i'll hate these things forever.
    I agree the rear hub is not as easy to service as a Chris King or DT Swiss. I personally never had to take the pawls apart, but I did take apart the rear hub and switch the rear axle on my I9 MTN hubs. It wasn't too bad IMO.

    I have 3 sets of I9 wheelsets, and all of them have been solid. I wonder why the set you worked on needed everything replaced. I agree it would be a major PITA to work on the pawls.

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    I've read that I9 makes some of the best hubs in the business...is this correct?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew L View Post
    I've read that I9 makes some of the best hubs in the business...is this correct?
    I like my I9s. I've had/have DT Swiss 240s/Chris King/I9, and my I45 (carbon tubs) have the smoothest bearings by far. I9 uses ceremic bearings in the road lineup, and even though people claim there is no benefit by using ceremic bearings in the bicycle hub application; my front wheel spins forever, and is super stiff.

    In the MTB market, the point of engagement is critical, and I9s have the highest POE in that market. POE is less crucial for the road application, but still a nice to have IMO. The amount of torque a rear hub can hold is key to its reliability. Both I9 and Chris King have been tested to failure at 800 ft/lbs, which is some of the highest in the industry.

    The last thing I want to note, is I9 switched the flange setup for the second generation of their road wheels. The flange spacing has been improved to allow a stiffer wheel, and mine shows.

    Here are a few bad pics of mine (1130 grams for the set!) if you care.



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    Thanks for the info and pics man...I actually found pics of your I9 wheels a few weeks ago and have been obsessed with them since. I love the black with blue hubs! You have a sweet ride

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    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew L View Post
    I've read that I9 makes some of the best hubs in the business...is this correct?
    Define best. Clearly, serviceability and use of standard parts isn't high on their list of virtues. I'm hard pressed to know why you'd choose an I9 hub over a Dura-Ace or Chris King (if you want colors).

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    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew L View Post
    I've read that I9 makes some of the best hubs in the business...is this correct?
    They dont do anything that other hubs cant do, and they require ridiculous service procedures. Id definitely say no!

    Its a bling part. Its not a part that makes sense, or does anything particularly well.

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    I've read that they are very reliable and are comparable to other leaders in the industry...does chris king make road wheels? I like the ability to customize the colors, but that is not my top priority. I want a durable, lightweight aluminum clincher to train with. I'm not really interested in a custom wheel-builder (don't ask why I just haven't come around on the idea).

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    Quote Originally Posted by TomH View Post
    They dont do anything that other hubs cant do, and they require ridiculous service procedures. Id definitely say no!

    Its a bling part. Its not a part that makes sense, or does anything particularly well.
    What would you recommend?

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    Id recommend you rethink custom wheels. In terms of what you get for the money you paid, nothing compares to custom built wheels. With factory wheels, you pay a ton of money for the name, marketing and hype.

    Id personally never buy a wheel that used proprietary spokes, or has hard to service hubs. Its a huge downside with no benefit besides bling.

    King makes some very nice road hubs.

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    My biggest concern with custom wheels are the repairs and associated costs. I was very interested in DT Speed dreams but I read that even though his warranty covered the repair costs you still have to cover the shipping costs which can get quite expensive. I liked the idea of going through a dealer and that way I can just have the wheels repaired there. Have you heard anything about mercury wheels? They've only been around a fee years but they look sweet!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew L View Post
    My biggest concern with custom wheels are the repairs and associated costs. I was very interested in DT Speed dreams but I read that even though his warranty covered the repair costs you still have to cover the shipping costs which can get quite expensive. I liked the idea of going through a dealer and that way I can just have the wheels repaired there. Have you heard anything about mercury wheels? They've only been around a fee years but they look sweet!
    If you bust a custom built wheels spoke, it'll run you a dollar and every lbs around will have them. It'll cost you a dollar. If you use fancy cx ray spokes, it might be 4 or 5 bucks, but you could use the dollar spoke in a pinch anyway. If they go untrue, anyone who knows how to work a wheel could fix it, for a marginal charge. After 10 or 15 thousand miles you might need a new rim, it'll run you 50-100 bucks for a premium rim.

    If you go to factory wheels and break a spoke, no one will stock them. It'll take a week to get them, and they'll be 6-15 bucks a piece. Once you get them, no one will want to work on them because they're proprietary, and you just might have to ship them to the manufacturer. 100 bucks later you'll have a fixed wheel. When you wear the rim out, they're typically 150-200 plus shipping again.

    Your two main concerns are the absolute biggest and best advantages of custom wheels! Super easy to service, anyone can do it, and parts are everywhere and usually in stock.

    Never heard of mercury..

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