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  1. #26
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    I like C24 wheels, although at their weight i dont really consider them "climbing specific wheels". I believe a set needs to be under 1200g to be worth the effort. Have you considered tubulars? My carbon tubulars are 1030g. Purchased the rims with no clear coat as it can be weighty. Lightly cleared them locally.

  2. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike T. View Post
    With a DT240, if you had a blob of grease with you, you could re-lube your ratchety bits at the side of the road, without any tools, while your riding buddy had a whizz. It's that easy.
    Really? Don't you need to remove the cassette?
    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein

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  3. #28
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    FWIW, the gravel bike I am buying has wheels which have 500+ gram rims. The wheelset is easily over 2000g. That bike has no problems climbing like any road bikes out there!
    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein

    "Beware of geeks bearing formulas."
    -- Warren Buffett

    "Education is what you get when you read the fine print. Experience is what you get when you don't. -- Pete Seeger



  4. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    Really? Don't you need to remove the cassette?
    If you can pull cassette hard enough it will pull the end cap off too. So no tool is needed

  5. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    Really? Don't you need to remove the cassette?
    Sure ya do but it just pulls off - bringing 1/2 the guts of the ratchety thing with it. Apply lube to the inner ring drive. press the guts back on, replace wheel, ride. 2 mins tops.
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  6. #31
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    So you pull the whole thing off without the tools - chain whip, special cassette socket? Am I missing something?
    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein

    "Beware of geeks bearing formulas."
    -- Warren Buffett

    "Education is what you get when you read the fine print. Experience is what you get when you don't. -- Pete Seeger



  7. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    So you pull the whole thing off without the tools - chain whip, special cassette socket? Am I missing something?
    Here it is in a nutshell Lomb.

    To swap cassettes on a DT240 you need the normal tools - whip, socket and knuckle-buster. That removes the cassette from its carrier - just like with normal hubs. That's JUST for cassette swaps.

    To lube the 240 ratchety parts you remove the wheel from the bike and laying the wheel flat, you pull up hard on the cassette's big cog. The carrier and cassette come off as a unit, exposing the ring drive (which is screwed into the hub shell) which you lube to quieten the hub down. You don't lose the washer and you press the carrier and its mounted cassette back onto the hub. Re-install wheel.
    Voila. If you had grease and your buddy needed a whizz he'd be still shaking the drops off his willy and you'd be riding off down the trail.
    .
    Mike T's home wheelbuilding site - dedicated to providing Newby wheelbuilder's with motivation, information and resources.

    Everything above, up to that blue line, is IMO IMO.

  8. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike T. View Post
    Here it is in a nutshell Lomb.

    To swap cassettes on a DT240 you need the normal tools - whip, socket and knuckle-buster. That removes the cassette from its carrier - just like with normal hubs. That's JUST for cassette swaps.

    To lube the 240 ratchety parts you remove the wheel from the bike and laying the wheel flat, you pull up hard on the cassette's big cog. The carrier and cassette come off as a unit, exposing the ring drive (which is screwed into the hub shell) which you lube to quieten the hub down. You don't lose the washer and you press the carrier and its mounted cassette back onto the hub. Re-install wheel.
    Voila. If you had grease and your buddy needed a whizz he'd be still shaking the drops off his willy and you'd be riding off down the trail.
    Interesting. Is this unique to the DT freehubs?
    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein

    "Beware of geeks bearing formulas."
    -- Warren Buffett

    "Education is what you get when you read the fine print. Experience is what you get when you don't. -- Pete Seeger



  9. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    Interesting. Is this unique to the DT freehubs?
    Dunno. In the DT hub line I've only had the 240.
    .
    Mike T's home wheelbuilding site - dedicated to providing Newby wheelbuilder's with motivation, information and resources.

    Everything above, up to that blue line, is IMO IMO.

  10. #35
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    Where's the part about chasing the spring and at least one ring drive down when it hits the floor

  11. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Enoch562 View Post
    Where's the part about chasing the spring and at least one ring drive down when it hits the floor
    Drop it in the dirt for a whole other level of fun. Or let it roll under the workbench with its black hole that swallows all parts.
    .
    Mike T's home wheelbuilding site - dedicated to providing Newby wheelbuilder's with motivation, information and resources.

    Everything above, up to that blue line, is IMO IMO.

  12. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    Interesting. Is this unique to the DT freehubs?
    My G3 Powertap is the same way, except it doesn't need lubed nearly as often. The first time you pull the hub off on the DT240 it take a pretty hard tug to get it loose, much easier afterwards.

    It takes more time to clean the parts than to lube them, I might be a little OC on the cleaning though.
    Moderation is boring - do epic s##t

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  13. #38
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    If you had higher budget Mavic R-Sys SLR would be some nice climbing clinger wheels at 1295 grams claimed weight
    Moderation is boring - do epic s##t

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  14. #39
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    I have several thousand miles on my REV22L set REV22 - Revolution Wheelworks

    They no longer sell that (light-weight) model but I haven't even had to true them yet (I'm 165 lbs) but I'm more impressed with their hubs. They will free spin longer than any other wheelset I have owned.

  15. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by config View Post
    I have several thousand miles on my REV22L set REV22 - Revolution Wheelworks

    They no longer sell that (light-weight) model but I haven't even had to true them yet (I'm 165 lbs) but I'm more impressed with their hubs. They will free spin longer than any other wheelset I have owned.
    Free spinning a wheel in the stand to see how long it will spin before stopping is always impressive to show off how great your hub bearings are. However, in "real world" situations, once on the bike, you will never know the difference unless your bearings are REALLY bad.

    I have bikes with Shimano that spin free for a long time and a bike with Formula hubs that don't spin very impressively. I cannot say I feel any slower on the bike with the Formula hubs.
    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein

    "Beware of geeks bearing formulas."
    -- Warren Buffett

    "Education is what you get when you read the fine print. Experience is what you get when you don't. -- Pete Seeger



  16. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    I certainly would not want to have to lube my freehub every 500 miles to keep it reasonably quiet.
    Truth right here.

  17. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    Free spinning a wheel in the stand to see how long it will spin before stopping is always impressive to show off how great your hub bearings are. However, in "real world" situations, once on the bike, you will never know the difference unless your bearings are REALLY bad.

    I have bikes with Shimano that spin free for a long time and a bike with Formula hubs that don't spin very impressively. I cannot say I feel any slower on the bike with the Formula hubs.
    Funny you mention that, we only discovered that while a friend and myself were both working on our bikes and had them up-side down he noticed my front wheel just kept on spinning while his Enve wheel would stop long before mine did. He would then spin it like crazy and I would barely spin mine and would still spin minutes after his stopped.

    I honestly thought these wheels would last 1 maybe 2 seasons considering the weight (1280g for the pair), but I had them for 7 years now and they still work great and stay true. Do they make me faster than my other wheels, data proves not but psychologically they do;-)

  18. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by config View Post
    Funny you mention that, we only discovered that while a friend and myself were both working on our bikes and had them up-side down he noticed my front wheel just kept on spinning while his Enve wheel would stop long before mine did. He would then spin it like crazy and I would barely spin mine and would still spin minutes after his stopped.

    I honestly thought these wheels would last 1 maybe 2 seasons considering the weight (1280g for the pair), but I had them for 7 years now and they still work great and stay true. Do they make me faster than my other wheels, data proves not but psychologically they do;-)

    Well that's what really matters, right?
    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein

    "Beware of geeks bearing formulas."
    -- Warren Buffett

    "Education is what you get when you read the fine print. Experience is what you get when you don't. -- Pete Seeger



  19. #44
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    in my opinion you won't find a better pair of climbing wheels , for the money than dura ace c-24's. i've put over 20,000 miles on mine, done tons of local climbs in rockland county ny on them plus some cat-1 and hc climbs in mallorca, girona, pyrenees , french alps and catskill ny region on them and have never been disappointed. you can spend more , but you won't get better climbing performance.

  20. #45
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    I realize this thread is a bit old and these are a bit over your price range, but quite a deal and quite light....

    https://www.excelsports.com/main.asp...jor=13&minor=1
    Well, you know, that's just, like, your opinion man. - The Dude

  21. #46
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    FWIW, I picked up a new set of 9100 C24s from my LBS.

    I got a nice deal, as they were special ordered for someone who changed their mind and bought a different set of wheels after the first ride.

    I did an imperial century with 8500 ft of climbing with them and they were just dandy.

    Sent from my Pixel using Tapatalk

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