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  1. #1
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    Mavic Open Pro Reborn





    Mavic rolls the Open Pro into the 21st century - BikeRadar

    3 Versions

    Normal rim brake
    Exalith rim brake
    Disc specific

    All are 420 grams
    All are tubeless compatible
    All are 19mm wide internally
    Rim brake versions come in 24, 28, and 32 hole
    Disc brake version comes in 28 or 32 hole
    use a torque wrench

  2. #2
    Adorable Furry Hombre
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    About time....but 420 grams? Intended to look like the spokes are pulling through the rim?

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marc View Post
    About time....but 420 grams? Intended to look like the spokes are pulling through the rim?
    It looks likes it's Mavic's ISM 4D, which is softer version of the ISM process that shaves sway rim material on the rim between the spokes. It's meant to save weight.
    Last edited by vagabondcyclist; 2 Weeks Ago at 01:03 PM.
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  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marc View Post
    About time....but 420 grams? Intended to look like the spokes are pulling through the rim?
    I have seen Ksyriums as well as a few other rims with this "spokes pulling through the rim" look. I don't know whether there is a reason for this other than looks.

    I would need to see real world reliability results before I would bite.
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  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    I have seen Ksyriums as well as a few other rims with this "spokes pulling through the rim" look. I don't know whether there is a reason for this other than looks.

    I would need to see real world reliability results before I would bite.

    With the claimed low weight, I wonder about it...since as vagabondcyclist mentioned...it appears to further thin the rim. Given the last few years and attempts to make a wide-format sub-450 gram rim, and the resultant underwhelming lifespan and durability...I'm a skeptic.
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  6. #6
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    Old Open Pro is 425-435g and is sturdy for 28 spoke count. What's the new rim depth?

    420g is certainly optimistic. Wouldn't trust 24 spoke rear at that weight.
    Last edited by carlosflanders; 2 Weeks Ago at 11:22 AM.

  7. #7
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    Another weight skeptic here. I love Open Pros to death as I seem to be one of the few people that has never had a nipple pull through. I have three sets of them - all 6-10 years old. But I've read of so many sub-450g rims with cracked nipple holes. IMO rims for "average people" (ie - where light rim weight is not the most important spec) need to be 450-500g for 150-200 lb riders.

    I wish Mavic all the best but they my money won't be used to test their longevity.
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  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    I have seen Ksyriums as well as a few other rims with this "spokes pulling through the rim" look. I don't know whether there is a reason for this other than looks.

    I would need to see real world reliability results before I would bite.
    It's to reduce weight while maintaining strength in the spoke bed area, or so Mavic claims. Mavic calls it interspoke milling. They've been doing for a long while--15 years or so. The newest version looks a little different in that the milling is a bit more rounded than when it first came out.
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  9. #9
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    I'll be the test pig and try the 24h--I just hope they will still make the 650c rim...
    Wake me up when it's alarm green.

  10. #10
    changingleaf
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    Great looking rim. It may be a bit light, but could be a great rim for some cyclists.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike T. View Post
    Another weight skeptic here. I love Open Pros to death as I seem to be one of the few people that has never had a nipple pull through. I have three sets of them - all 6-10 years old. But I've read of so many sub-450g rims with cracked nipple holes. IMO rims for "average people" (ie - where light rim weight is not the most important spec) need to be 450-500g for 150-200 lb riders.

    I wish Mavic all the best but they my money won't be used to test their longevity.
    I'm currently running 32 spoke Velocity A23 (430 gm) on the front and A23 OC (450 gm) on the rear. 20K miles and no issues so far at my roughly 200 lbs. (90 kg) of total bike and rider weight. With earlier Velocity Aerohead OCs I had spoke hole and rim sidewall cracking with early production rims on the rear (around 415 gm) but later production runs had the rims up to around 440 gm and no failure problems.

    From this I conclude that 430-440 gm is the lower limit for durability on "normal" width rims and more like 450 for wider rims. 500 seems excessive, at least for my weight, power output, road surfaces, and riding style. There have been many claimed successful light weight rims since I switched to clinchers and MAVIC Open Pro but none have proved durable.

  12. #12
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    Skeptical about being so light, yes, but less so than with a rim of uniform thickness and not built up around the spoke holes (or built down between them depending how you look at it)

    Is it an optical illusion or is the brake track wavy on the inner side? That would seem odd and for no apparent reason if that's the case.

  13. #13
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    I say, Good for them, With a 19 mm internal width they have moved in a good direction. Like the black brake track, so another plus there. THe wobbly spoke bed is NOT very attractive, but I understand it. THe weight is great, although it is a bit scarey. I hope it works. It wouldn't surprise if it came in around 430/440 once they start spitting them out.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jay Strongbow View Post
    Skeptical about being so light, yes, but less so than with a rim of uniform thickness and not built up around the spoke holes (or built down between them depending how you look at it)

    Is it an optical illusion or is the brake track wavy on the inner side? That would seem odd and for no apparent reason if that's the case.

    Yea...that brake track is definitely wavy too. Hinky.
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    how do these compare to the HED C2plus rims?

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marc View Post
    Yea...that brake track is definitely wavy too. Hinky.
    It looks like the track is taller where the spokes are. Probably because the brake track needs extra material machined where it is thicker resulting in that visual variation.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jfaas View Post
    It looks like the track is taller where the spokes are. Probably because the brake track needs extra material machined where it is thicker resulting in that visual variation.
    Why do you figure that could ever be the case? Given that the wheel turns 360 I can't imagine why a brake track would need to be wider in particular areas and more narrow in others.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jay Strongbow View Post
    Why do you figure that could ever be the case? Given that the wheel turns 360 I can't imagine why a brake track would need to be wider in particular areas and more narrow in others.
    The wheel turns 360 degrees, the machining of brake tracks makes the tracks parallel. The extra material at the spokes forms perpendicular "doughnuts" that need to be machined flat to match the thinner sections between spokes. This will cause a wavy edge on the brake track.

    I cannot find any information about ISM 4d, so this is speculation from what I can see in pictures.

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  19. #19
    .je
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    I think what that meant was that the wavy form at the spoke holes makes it hard or impossible to form the metal without creating a wave in the cross direction so they add material to support or just hide it, and in any case, will mill away material to make a flat brake track.

    It could be that or it could be that it just looks better. Ask maviczack if you can find him, or someone there.

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