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  1. #1
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    Michelin Rim Strips wrinkling

    I have a set of used Open Pros with Michelin yellow rim strips. Just got them back from truing and I was hoping to ride them tonight. But it was not meant to be.

    The strips seem to be in good condition, but they are not snug against the inside of the rim. As I mount the tires on them I notice that the rim strip bunches up in one place. I've tried a couple of times but each time I go to seat the 2nd bead I can see it bunching somewhere. I could not find these strips on the Michelin website so no indication of the correct use of these.

    Is this normal? Would gentle coaxing with a hot air gun shrink it to fit better? The wheel is 700x23 and the rim strip is marked Michelin 18_622.

    Thanks in advance.

    Dave

  2. #2
    Diesel Engine
    Reputation: Mike Prince's Avatar
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    Sounds like the rim strips are a bit stretched out from being removed. You can try heating them but be careful not to melt them, they are thin. Easiest solution is to replace them with Velox rim tape or the replacement rim strip of your choice.

    In my opinion good rim strips at less than $5 are too inexpensive (and too critical to riding enjoyment) to mess around with ones that are not doing the job.

  3. #3
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    The rim strips were never removed as far as I know. However I got nervous about running my Fortezza SEs on them because the Fortezza recommends 115psi minimum and I'm almost 200lb and will probably run these at 125.

    In any case I got a set of Velox rim tapes and replaced both rim strips. One thing I really like is they allow the tire to rest deeper in the rim and mount and dismount more easily. So I'll be trimming down my wedge bag kit from 3 to 1 lever.

    David

  4. #4
    Get me to In&Out
    Reputation: spookyload's Avatar
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    Good call David. $5 worth of rim tape is well worth not ruining a ride on new rubber. We only get so many rides in our life and not getting a flat for something we can prevent will keep one more of them fun.
    Cyclists really need to learn a little Rule #5.

  5. #5
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    No minimum

    Quote Originally Posted by dgeesaman
    Fortezza recommends 115psi minimum and I'm almost 200lb and will probably run these at 125.
    There is no such thing as a minimum tire pressure. There might be a number on the tire's sidewall, but it doesn't mean anything. People can ride these tires at 80 psi with no problems if they're light enough so that they don't get pinch flats.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kerry Irons
    There is no such thing as a minimum tire pressure. There might be a number on the tire's sidewall, but it doesn't mean anything. People can ride these tires at 80 psi with no problems if they're light enough so that they don't get pinch flats.
    The basic physics of that is obviously true. I rode my original Bontrager wheels and tires at 100-110psi (I'm 195lb) and tonight I rode the newer wheels at 120psi.

    However, 80psi is a ridiculous place to start at my size.

    The Fortezza SE's have a harder center section and softer rubber outside for cornering. I suspect the increased pressure may serve to keep the contact patch within the harder center section so that tread wear on the soft sides is minimized.

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