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  1. #1
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    Mixing 23s and 25s

    Any beneits/drawbacks to running 25c for a rear and 23c in front? Generally use the same model Vittoria clincher.

    thx,

  2. #2
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    I don't see any reason why you can't do this. But I don't see any reason why you would want to do this.

    If you want to run a 25mm tire in back, why would you not want to run a 25mm tire in front?
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  3. #3
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    I guess because I expect to enjoy the comfort more in the rear and in theory 23c more aero in the front. I suppose more than anything, because my supply on hand works better using the 25c tires in the rear, allowing me to go through some of my stock of 23c tires by using them in the front. Lots of theoretical going on here.

  4. #4
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    Well it is true that there is more load in your rear tire. So if you want to have your front and rear tire pressure the same (for whatever reason, I don't know) this would be the way to go.

    IMO, I'd rather have the ride be softer in front. My arse can deal with more shock than my hands.

    Aero? I doubt you will notice a difference, really.
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

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  5. #5
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    All good points and I especially agree about the shock in the bars up front. This may just be a way for me to use up my 23c stock (seems like the only size I used to use to come close to the sewups I raced on). Once, I have run them out, I can enjoy the 25c all around. thx.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by GKSki View Post
    All good points and I especially agree about the shock in the bars up front. This may just be a way for me to use up my 23c stock (seems like the only size I used to use to come close to the sewups I raced on). Once, I have run them out, I can enjoy the 25c all around. thx.
    Sounds like a good solution. Or you can sell your leftover stock of 23mm tires on eBay.
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by GKSki View Post
    All good points and I especially agree about the shock in the bars up front. This may just be a way for me to use up my 23c stock (seems like the only size I used to use to come close to the sewups I raced on). Once, I have run them out, I can enjoy the 25c all around. thx.
    Back in the day when everyone believed that skinny tires were faster, I used to run a 20 up front and a 23 in the rear. Never had an issue (other than harsh ride)

  8. #8
    tlg
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    There's absolutely nothing wrong with doing it. Continental sells the Grand Prix Attack & Force set which is a 23F/25R.
    https://www.continental-tires.com/bi...tack-and-force

    Running the same pressure front/rear is a nice feature. But beyond that I don't know if there's really much benefit (other than using up your stock). Aerodynamics has as much (if not more) to do with the rim width than just the tire width.
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  9. #9
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    I did that for a few years.

    You own the tires already. Trying it for yourself if the best way to answer your question.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jay Strongbow View Post
    I did that for a few years.

    You own the tires already. Trying it for yourself if the best way to answer your question.
    Same here, been doing it for years without a drawback, and on my one bike I couldn't fit a 25 in (an older Tarmac), I ran a tubeless 23 for the increased comfort.
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  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jay Strongbow View Post
    I did that for a few years.

    You own the tires already. Trying it for yourself if the best way to answer your question.
    Me too, 23 fr/25rr.
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  12. #12
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    The only drawback I can see is you need to keep more tires on hand for spares.
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  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by GKSki View Post
    allowing me to go through some of my stock of 23c tires by using them in the front.
    You should be aware that tires wear out due to power transfer, not mileage. The power transfer (whether pedaling power or braking power) causes the tread rubber to be scrubbed off. I have put over 6,000 miles on a front tire with essentially zero weight loss. A front tire may get cut, crazed, and otherwise aged but it won't wear out due to tread loss. Thus, your stock of 23mm tires will last a very, very, very long time.

    The ride of 25s is better than 23s, but unless your weight is such that you have to pump a rear 23 to really high pressures, you should just mount your oldest tires and ride them until they wear out.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kerry Irons View Post
    You should be aware that tires wear out due to power transfer, not mileage. The power transfer (whether pedaling power or braking power) causes the tread rubber to be scrubbed off. I have put over 6,000 miles on a front tire with essentially zero weight loss. A front tire may get cut, crazed, and otherwise aged but it won't wear out due to tread loss. Thus, your stock of 23mm tires will last a very, very, very long time.
    This is true. A front tire lasts me much longer than a rear. When the rear wears out, I transfer the front to the rear, then put on a new front. As a result, I don't know how long a front tire would actually last if it stayed there, but my guess from looking at the wear (or lack thereof), more than twice as long as the rear.
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

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  15. #15
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    My Aeroad came this way. Canyon says the same thing, narrower tire up front for better aero. But the wheels that come on it are 17mm wide, so the tires actually measured 25/27mm. I swapped them out for 32s, I want a lot of comfort haha.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by dcorn View Post
    My Aeroad came this way. Canyon says the same thing, narrower tire up front for better aero. But the wheels that come on it are 17mm wide, so the tires actually measured 25/27mm. I swapped them out for 32s, I want a lot of comfort haha.
    Nothing wrong with comfort. If your frame can fit'em, buy'em.
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  17. #17
    pmf
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    I used to do 20F/23R back when only tourists rode big tires.

    Don't those special tires Mavic makes for their special wheels differ in size front and back?

  18. #18
    changingleaf
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    Benefit of having a more cushion in the rear where the extra weight is. drawback is slightly more weight. Cushion and pinch flat protection is going to outweigh the extra weight of the tire.

  19. #19
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    The only drawback to running two different tire sizes is you can't rotate the front to the rear when the rear gets worn. Well, you can, but it would defeat the original purpose of running differing sizes.
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  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by SauronHimself View Post
    The only drawback to running two different tire sizes is you can't rotate the front to the rear when the rear gets worn. Well, you can, but it would defeat the original purpose of running differing sizes.
    Yes and no. The OP's original purpose of running different sizes is to use up his supply of 23mm tires.
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

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  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    As a result, I don't know how long a front tire would actually last if it stayed there, but my guess from looking at the wear (or lack thereof), more than twice as long as the rear.
    Re-read what I posted. Zero wear on the front after 6,000 miles. If you simply left the tire on the front you would replace it because it was all cut up or the rubber was cracking, not because it was worn out. The rubber thickness would still be there.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kerry Irons View Post
    Re-read what I posted. Zero wear on the front after 6,000 miles. If you simply left the tire on the front you would replace it because it was all cut up or the rubber was cracking, not because it was worn out. The rubber thickness would still be there.
    Point taken, but zero wear? After 3000 miles when I retire the rear tire and move the front to the rear, I would say very little wear, but not zero. While there are no drive forces in front, there are still braking forces as well as corning forces.
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



  23. #23
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    I actually run 23c in the front and 25 in the rear on one of my bikes for the same reason. Been doing it for about a month now and am satisfied with it. Not sure that I benefit from it but I don't like the squishy feeling I get riding at lower pressures in the front. Everyone has their preferences.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    Point taken, but zero wear? After 3000 miles when I retire the rear tire and move the front to the rear, I would say very little wear, but not zero. While there are no drive forces in front, there are still braking forces as well as corning forces.
    currently have 8700 miles on the front tire (Conti 4KIIS). the wear indicators don't look appreciably different from those on a brand new tire.
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