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  1. #1
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    New Campy Eurus or Record W/ Open Pro?

    Here is my dilemma:
    I have been running record w/ open pro wheels for quite a while (years) and have been completely satisfied, but I think it is time to start switching things out. I was going to have the mechaninc I go to start with a new rear wheel (record w/ open pro). If I buy a new rear wheel now and hold off on the front, the sticker shock for my wife might be a little easier to handle.

    The mechanic I go to builds quality wheels and is very confident in his wheel builds, but he also speaks highly of the Campy factory wheels. He usually offers decent prices, but he said Campy has a promotion right now where he might be able to get the new Eurus wheels for roughly a $150 more than what it would cost to get a record w/ open pro wheelset built.

    This is very tempting, but the initial sticker shock is a little too much for my wife (and myself) right now.

    -I ride all kinds of roads: rough, smooth, steep, flat, no racing.

    -I like having the option with my current wheels of being able to go into most any shop and have a spoke replaced.

    -I have heard all the hype about having light weight fancy wheels, but I am sold more on reliability and strength. When it comes to loosing weight, my body needs to shed the pounds before my bike.

    -Having the option of going tubeless sounds appealing.

    Sorry for the rambling. So I guess my question boils down to: are the Eurus wheels worth another $150-200 more than a quality handbuilt wheelset?

  2. #2
    So. Calif.
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    You didn't state your weight, but let's assume you are 190 lbs or under. Eurus wheelset is pretty light, very strong (despite low spoke counts), slightly more aero, and a lot sexier/blingy looking.

    A friend in the mid-high 180 lbs range has been on Eurus for 3+ years ... hard training and racing ... wheels have stayed very true and never a broken spoke.

    I'm on Campy Shamal wheels (2700 miles so far) and 100% satisfied ... I weigh 167 lbs.

    CAVEATS: spokes, if they do break, are harder to find and costly, about $14-15 each ... I bought spares.

    OTOH, if you've been satisfied with your Record/Open Pro, why not stick with it? your primary criteria seem to be "reliability and strength".

    As you also point out, much cheaper and easier to service spokes, if one breaks.

    I guess this is a non-answer ;-)
    But, I (and probably many others) can vouch for the Campy factory wheels if you're interested.

    If you go this route, you should also check prices from UK retailers Wiggle & Ribble. Make sure to set your "ship to" country correctly (USA?), then it automatically deducts the 15% VAT that USA residents don't pay.

  3. #3
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    Price and choice

    [QUOTE=sod8Having the option of going tubeless sounds appealing. So I guess my question boils down to: are the Eurus wheels worth another $150-200 more than a quality handbuilt wheelset?[/QUOTE]

    There is essentially zero performance improvement for the Eurus wheels. You know the reasons to stick with handbuilts. Whether tubeless is worth paying for is a very open question. The jury is still out on that one, and may be for a long time - for something touted as "all that and a bag of chips" tubeless seems to be having trouble gaining traction in the marketplace.

  4. #4
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    The eurus wheels are some of the best on the market. they are the stiffest rear wheel out there (factory wheel that is - in the tour test). I had a set when i was running campy and they were the best alum wheel i have ever run. I am a 185lbs sprinter and rode them very hard. no probs at all. basically bombproof. i actually had the orig thin spoke version and the newer thick spoke. both were great. I run the dura ace tubeless wheels now, and like the tubeless option (although those wheels are not as good as the eurus wheels). so, the 2 way fit eurus would be a great option. i don't think you could even compare them with a set of record hub open pro wheels.

  5. #5
    So. Calif.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kerry Irons
    There is essentially zero performance improvement for the Eurus wheels. You know the reasons to stick with handbuilts. ....
    Fair assessment ...

    Front wheel aero losses @ 31 mph :
    http://www.rouesartisanales.com/article-15505311.html
    2006 Eurus (24mm depth, 16 spokes) is roughly at the median, 27.8 watts.

    High spoke count, shallower box rims would be at the higher end ... can't immediately find data , but likely at the higher end c. 33-35 watts.

    As Kerry states, at 20 mph the quantifiable performance differences would be negligible : c. 1/3 of the difference at 31 mph = c. 1.6 watts .


    I'd suggest an analogy - on your "favorite" car, do you prefer :
    A) OEM stamped steel "pie plate" wheels with a plastic hubcap, OR
    B) snazzy polished aluminum alloy wheels
    For the two wheelsets you're comparing, it may come down to this sort of value proposition.

  6. #6
    Hucken The Fard Up !
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    bit of a cruel analogy tom_h

    I use polished alloy wheels with wide summer tyres and OEM steel wheels with winter tyres on my car.

    In the same way I have my blingy wheels with Vittoria CX for spring/summer and my Open Pro/DA 32x3 with Pavés for autumn/winter.

    make sense
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  7. #7
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    How about trying a wider rim wheel (23mm vs 19mm Open Pro) like the HED C2 wheels? I think the wide rims will become the standard - provides the convenience of a clincher and near supple ride of a tubular. Here's a review of the HED Ardennes http://www.cyclingnews.com/reviews/hed-ardennes-wheels

    Velocity is coming out with the A23 rim and I think dealers can get the HED rims (instead of complete wheel).

    I had passed on some Eurus wheels recently to save my $$ for some HEDs.

  8. #8
    cmg
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    or you can have the campy wheelset built with lighter rims. Use KinLin XR-200 clincher rims, run revolutions or sapim cx-rays spokes on the front and non-driveside rear, DT swiss DB14 on the driveside.

  9. #9
    foz
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    Although the eurus are on offer, try to find a price for the zonda. They're a lot cheaper than the eurus, and almost identical. There's a slight weight penalty, but if you don't race then that's not important.

    Most people I know go with the zonda over the eurus - they're much better value for money.

  10. #10
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    +1 for looking into Zondas - I have both the thin spoke (2006) and flat spoke (2008) versions, and both are excellent. I only weigh 145, but I've never had a broken spoke or even needed to have them trued.

    That said, I am considering a set of open pros and record hubs for traveling, etc. due to the availability of replacement parts. I have heard that replacement zonda spokes are only available as a complete set, and would run around $300. If I ever break a spoke, I don't think I would bother.
    Fighting C ystic F ibrosis with C arbon F iber
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  11. #11
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    Thanks for all the input, now I have even more ideas running through my head .

    As for my weight, I am 195 right now, but I could easily drop 10-15 lbs if I keep riding the amount I have been.

    Right now I am leaning more towards a set of handbuilt wheels, due to the ease of service.

    I am pretty set on the Record hubs but am willing to consider some different rims like a couple of you have mentioned.

    Thanks,
    Shamus

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by tom_h



    I'd suggest an analogy - on your "favorite" car, do you prefer :[INDENT]A) OEM stamped steel "pie plate" wheels with a plastic hubcap, OR
    B) snazzy polished aluminum alloy wheels

    .
    Well, on my '89 Toyota Pickup I have rusty steel rims to go with my fading grey paint job.

    Thanks for the info.

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