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  1. #1
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    New up to 1200$ wheelset for light rider

    Hey everyone.
    Please help me with choosing new wheelset for my Emonda SL6(2015), which came with stock clinchers, weight 1800g.
    I am an avarage recreational cyclist, from Europe, light (57kg at 178cm hight), who suffer on flats and prefer riding hills and would like to treat myself after hard working season. I do mostly solo rides and ride with friends sometimes.
    My budget goes up to 1200$ and as i have read before, i am too light for deep rim wheelset. So, i guess the only thing to consider is weight and ignore deep rim wheels?
    I prefer silent hubs and am not any of mechanic, so building my own is not an option.
    What would you buy under those circumstances?
    Thank you in advance for any advice.

  2. #2
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    Dura Ace hubs (because you said you like quiet and because they are really good), CX-Ray spokes and H Plus Son Archetype rims is a can't miss combo IMO. HED C2 rims and/or White Hubs are solid too. I'd say White hubs are about average noise wise. The Hed rims are very good but after suing them and Archetype I don't feel the extra price gives you anything over the Archetype rims.

  3. #3
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    I would be getting a set of Shimano Dura Ace 9100 wheels if I had your budget at your weight.
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  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jay Strongbow View Post
    Dura Ace hubs (because you said you like quiet and because they are really good), CX-Ray spokes and H Plus Son Archetype rims is a can't miss combo IMO. HED C2 rims and/or White Hubs are solid too. I'd say White hubs are about average noise wise. The Hed rims are very good but after suing them and Archetype I don't feel the extra price gives you anything over the Archetype rims.
    Another great bang for the buck in rims are the DT R460s. Apparently, the only reason they are cheaper than the HED C2s and Archetypes is because they have pinned/sleeved joints rather than welded joints. I did notice a very slight cyclical noise against the joint while braking when the rims were new, but it went away after less than 100 miles, so all is good.

    And really, you don't need to spend $1200 to get a good set of wheels. If you know of a custom builder, that would be the way to go. A set of DT R460s, Dura-Ace 9000 hubs, DT Swiss Competition (butted) spokes and nipples will get you up to around $500 in materials and I'm guessing around $100-200 labor to build them. That will get you in the 1600g range. Anything less than that is breadcrumbs.

    At your weight, you could probably go with just about any spoke count, though I tend to favor at least 24 front, 28 rear.
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



  5. #5
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    I think at your weight, there are a plethora of wheels that you can ride easily. The aforementioned wheels are good all-around wheels, but 1600 grams does not qualify as a climbing wheel for someone as light as you are. Me, maybe, but you're a lot lighter. Dura Ace 9100 C24s both fall in your budget and are quite a bit lighter. If you look for sales, you can get them for a quite a bit less too. Dura Ace anything is darn near perfect. Another option would be custom. In fact, I say stop reading these and contact a reputable wheel builder near you. They are worth their weight in gold and can build you something absolutely amazing in your price range.

    Update: If you decide on off the shelf wheels, These Dura Ace c24s will work fine:

    https://www.biketiresdirect.com/prod...C24%20Wheelset

    As I also mentioned, strongly look into custom as well. I don't think you can beat Shimano for off the shelf wheels (light and reliable), but you can probably get those features, plus even lighter weight with similar durability and reliability if you go custom for similar prices. Your call, but you won't be disappointed either way.
    Last edited by terbennett; 05-09-2018 at 11:43 AM.

  6. #6
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    C24s are what you're looking for.

    have had two sets (7900 / 9000)...both have been great.

    light, affordable...way under your $1200 limit.
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  7. #7
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    Dura-Ace 9100 C40s (or new old stock 9000 C35s) might be right up your alley.

  8. #8
    pmf
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    I lean towards custom built wheels. And as someone has said, you don't need to spend $1200 to get a good set of wheels. The last custom set I had built (actually the last two) were HED Belgian rims, Sapim cxray spokes (28R/24F), and White Industries T11 hubs. They came in around 1550 grams. They ride nice and have been zero maintenance. And if I ever do break a spoke, they're easily found. I have not rebuilt the hubs, but the directions show that its very simple.

    The Dura Ace C40's look nice, but 21 spokes on the rear wheel would make me nervous.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by pmf View Post

    The Dura Ace C40's look nice, but 21 spokes on the rear wheel would make me nervous.
    So would rim replacement cost and potentially availability. Even if they are bomb proof the brake tracks can wear out.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by ROOTS View Post
    Hey everyone.
    from Europe, light (57kg at 178cm hight),
    57 kilos?!

    Dam#, Root....

    You skinny little euromarshmellows drive me nuts. Even after racing over here for 2 1/2 decades (living full-time last decade+).

    Where you live? I'm gonna hunt your skinny beanpole down and put you in the "PainLocker" across the Benelux flats & bergs.

    57 kilos....friggin he!!, I'd be consistently putting out over 6 watts per kilo at that weight.....

    Hahahahha (hope you know I'm just giving you a hard time).


    Seriously, like everyone says, it is really going to be hard to go wrong at your weight. One thing I will say, of all my wheel sets, both of my Ultegra hubs with H Plus Sons Archetypes builds I did (Wheelsmith spokes) are uber-quiet. I'd bet Dura-Ace ones would run dead silent.


    P.S. Training tip: Start drinking more beer, son, you need some weight!

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jay Strongbow View Post
    So would rim replacement cost and potentially availability. Even if they are bomb proof the brake tracks can wear out.
    This is the problem with most factory built wheels - proprietary parts. If a budget wheel set pops a spoke or the rim cracks or wears out and it's not replaceable, well, the wheel set was only $200-300. You toss it and move on. A $1200 wheel set I would want to be able to repair.

    Also, while the OP at 127lbs. would probably have no issues with a 16/20 wheel set, if he has the unfortunate luck of popping a spoke mid-ride, there's no way he can adjust the spokes around it to get that wheel true enough to ride home. He'll be walking or calling for a ride.
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by BelgianHammer View Post
    57 kilos?!

    Dam#, Root....

    You skinny little euromarshmellows drive me nuts. Even after racing over here for 2 1/2 decades (living full-time last decade+).

    Where you live? I'm gonna hunt your skinny beanpole down and put you in the "PainLocker" across the Benelux flats & bergs.

    57 kilos....friggin he!!, I'd be consistently putting out over 6 watts per kilo at that weight.....

    Hahahahha (hope you know I'm just giving you a hard time).


    Seriously, like everyone says, it is really going to be hard to go wrong at your weight. One thing I will say, of all my wheel sets, both of my Ultegra hubs with H Plus Sons Archetypes builds I did (Wheelsmith spokes) are uber-quiet. I'd bet Dura-Ace ones would run dead silent.


    P.S. Training tip: Start drinking more beer, son, you need some weight!

    Mine are not the current generation but Ultegra are actually a little quieter.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by BelgianHammer View Post
    One thing I will say, of all my wheel sets, both of my Ultegra hubs with H Plus Sons Archetypes builds I did (Wheelsmith spokes) are uber-quiet. I'd bet Dura-Ace ones would run dead silent.
    Quote Originally Posted by Jay Strongbow View Post
    Mine are not the current generation but Ultegra are actually a little quieter.
    I have wheel sets with Ultegra 6800s and Dura-Ace 9000s. To me, they are equally as quiet. Not dead silent, but with enough wind blowing around your ears, you won't hear it. You're not going to get dead silent without spending big $$$ on something like Stealth or Onyx hubs.

    Quote Originally Posted by BelgianHammer View Post
    P.S. Training tip: Start drinking more beer, son, you need some weight!
    Don't listen, Root. Hammer is just trying to slow you down so he can pass you!
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



  14. #14
    pmf
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    Also, while the OP at 127lbs. would probably have no issues with a 16/20 wheel set, if he has the unfortunate luck of popping a spoke mid-ride, there's no way he can adjust the spokes around it to get that wheel true enough to ride home. He'll be walking or calling for a ride.
    I broke a spoke on a Mavic Ksyrium (rear wheel) about 10 miles from home one time. I had to take off my brake pads for the wheel to clear the brake calipers. It was a slow, wobbly ride home. If I break a spoke on the custom wheels, I can get it true enough to ride home.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by pmf View Post
    I broke a spoke on a Mavic Ksyrium (rear wheel) about 10 miles from home one time. I had to take off my brake pads for the wheel to clear the brake calipers. It was a slow, wobbly ride home. If I break a spoke on the custom wheels, I can get it true enough to ride home.
    Interesting. My limiting factor on both my road bikes are the chain stays, not the brakes. I once broke a spoke on a 24 hole rear wheel and got it true enough to ride 30 more miles back to the start. It was somewhat wobbly, not unrideable, but I didn't feel comfortable going over 20mph.
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



  16. #16
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    For silence, you can't beat an Onyx RP hub. They use a clutch mechanism rather than ratchet and pawls. Result is no sound and no buzz when you coast.

    These hubs run a little heavy, but it shouldn't be hard to put together a <1500g wheelset from somebody like prowheelbuilder. For the heck of it I looked at a set of wheels with Onyx rear hub, White Industries front, and Altamont Lite rims from Boyd. 20 radial spokes in front and 24 2x rear. The set came in on paper at just under 1500g and $1100.

  17. #17
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    IMO, Onyx or Stealth hubs aren't worth the extra cost or weight over Dura-Ace in order to have a dead silent hub. Shimano hubs have a sound, but in the words of another RBR poster (I forget who said it) "If you find the Shimano freehub sound annoying, the CIA could probably use you".
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



  18. #18
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    Average, recreational cyclist, with$1,200 wheels. .

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    I am astonished over so many kind, funny and critical responses!
    I thought nobody would answer to that 1000times must have been posted before question.
    I will go with Dura Ace R9100 24 or 40's...not shure which (200$ do not play a role for this kind of purchase; always(but first time) bought overkill bike gear, never top shelf & never regretted); need to find some info from guys light as me, riding any kind of deeper wheels in wind...i guess that will tilt the decision to 24's.
    40 are deeper than 24's and so they do roll faster on flats, they hold speed better(?)but are (much?) more affected by the cross winds...and they both have approx same low weight, stiffness, very good reviews on the Internet(don't they all?), but 40's have a bit better ones..
    I do not know any wheel builder and wouldn't even know what to say or expect, so going with the "bomb proof" is only option.
    It is my second season on road bike (breaking a shoulder on MTB/thus not being able to ride it in woods for months, was initial reason for buying one...aaand it became anoooother bike obsession) and since there is no way i could afford to loose any body weight, i feel going for good and light set of wheels, for the first time in life, wouldn't be sooo much of hedonism....just a bit..
    Thank you all!
    Last edited by ROOTS; 05-09-2018 at 05:03 AM.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by ROOTS View Post
    I am astonished over so many kind, funny and critical responses!
    I thought nobody would answer to that 1000times must have been posted before question.
    I will go with Dura Ace R9100 24 or 40's...not shure which (200$ do not play a role for this kind of purchase; always(but first time) bought overkill bike gear, never top shelf & never regretted); need to find some info from guys light as me, riding any kind of deeper wheels in wind...i guess that will tilt the decision to 24's.
    40 are deeper than 24's and so they do roll faster on flats, they hold speed better(?)but are (much?) more affected by the cross winds...and they both have approx same low weight, stiffness, very good reviews on the Internet(don't they all?), but 40's have a bit better ones..
    I do not know any wheel builder and wouldn't even know what to say or expect, so going with the "bomb proof" is only option.
    It is my second season on road bike (breaking a shoulder on MTB/thus not being able to ride it in woods for months, was initial reason for buying one...aaand it became anoooother bike obsession) and since there is no way i could afford to loose any body weight, i feel going for good and light set of wheels, for the first time in life, wouldn't be sooo much of hedonism....just a bit..
    Thank you all!
    At your weight, I would say that deep section wheels could blow you all over the place in a cross wind, not to mention that 18-wheeler truck that barrels by you at 60mph (100kmph) could ruin your day. I would go with the 24s.
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



  21. #21
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    The C40s (which are really the same depth as the older C35s) really aren't that deep, in my experience with 3 sets of C24s and 1 set of C35s crosswinds are no more noticeable. I weigh a bit more than you though, closer to 80 kg.

    Tbh I find the performance differences negligible but I don't regret the C35 purchase, in part because they just look really cool.
    Last edited by jetdog9; 05-09-2018 at 03:03 PM.

  22. #22
    pmf
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    This guy has a good reputation here and sells custom wheels

    https://novemberbicycles.com/

    I've bought 3 sets from this outfit and been pleased

    https://www.psimet.com/

    I am affiliated with neither. Try calling them and see what they recommend.

    I'd avoid tubeless rims, unless you plan to use tubeless tires.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by pmf View Post
    I'd avoid tubeless rims, unless you plan to use tubeless tires.
    Unless you find some new/old stock, your choices will be limited. That being said, HED C2s (not plus) and H+ Son Archetypes are both excellent rims and aren't designed to be tubeless. It looks like the C2 is being phased out, but there is still plenty of stock out there.

    Tubeless compatible rims are definitely harder to mount tires on, but once you get the technique, you will wonder what all the cursing was about. It certainly isn't worth disqualifying a good rim from consideration just because of this. Art's Cyclery has a good You Tube video on the technique.
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



  24. #24
    tlg
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    Quote Originally Posted by pmf View Post
    I'd avoid tubeless rims, unless you plan to use tubeless tires.
    Why? You don't have to use tubeless tires with tubeless rims. Regular tires work fine. I've got a few sets of tubeless rims and I can change a regular tire without levers.
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  25. #25
    pmf
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    Quote Originally Posted by tlg View Post
    Why? You don't have to use tubeless tires with tubeless rims. Regular tires work fine. I've got a few sets of tubeless rims and I can change a regular tire without levers.
    I guess I'm generalizing from a small sample size. My wife has a set of wheels that were built on tubeless ready rims (I didn't realize they were tubeless when I had them built). It's a bear to get tires on and off the rims. Not that my Campy Neutrons are any better. The HED Belgium rims are easy.

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