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Thread: Rear Bearings

  1. #1
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    Rear Bearings

    Iím curious. Does anyone know of a website with a good description of how bearings support the combination of hub/freehub? I did some service on my OnyxRP rear hub, and it brought home the fact that of the 4 sealed bearings, the one at NDS is between the hub and the axle, the one at DS is between freehub body and axle, and the two in the middle are between hub and freehub body. That much is clear from the tech video at https://onyxrp.com/tech/. I donít know if other 4-bearing rear hubs are similar, but I assume so.

    So one side of the hub rides on the axle through the bearing on NDS, one side of the freehub body rides on the axle through the one on DS, and where they meet in between they somehow lean on each other through the two remaining bearings. What Iím wondering is how the bearings load up in order to carry all the weight and also keep the hub and the freehub body concentric w/each other?


  2. #2
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    No, but it appears to be pretty common and operational.
    Last edited by duriel; 1 Week Ago at 05:44 PM.
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    Would you mind telling me what you think of the hubs? How they work in real life situations, build quality. Did you get the alloy free hub?

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    Quote Originally Posted by timsmcm View Post
    Would you mind telling me what you think of the hubs? How they work in real life situations, build quality. Did you get the alloy free hub?
    The hub pretty much lives up to the hype. Coasting is super smooth because there is zero hub vibration transmitted through the frame. I canít be sure if drag is lower than with the decent ratchet hub (Boyd) I had before. I think it is, but it was already pretty low with the Boyd. Engagement is awesome. It always feels Ö exact. It happens almost instantly, but thereís a slight transition that softens it, not like hitting a brick wall. I weigh 195lb bone dry, and thereís never any slip, even when I stand up to climb.



    Manufacturing quality seems great. All the parts are smooth, solid, and close-fitting. I got an alloy freehub body to save some weight. With alloy, I probably added around 75gr compared to my old hub, but I havenít noticed the difference. Not having ridden with a steel freehub, I donít know what that extra weight would feel like. The steel wire inserts in the cog slots are clever, but even with them in place the alloy is showing a trace or two of gouging Ė less than Iíve experienced with other freehubs, tho.



    My overall opinion is of the hub is high. The quality is tops, and it makes your ride smoother. It might even make you faster, but I canít say for sure. You could say that cheaper hubs are perfectly good, but the same applies to a lot of high-end gear. In this case you get a deluxe-feeling ride for your money, and each person has to decide if thatís worth the extra bucks. If I have any regret, it's that I went with black instead of one of their fancy colors. Black blends perfectly with my wheels, but that means nobody notices my cool hub.

    One final note: Reason I had the hub apart was to change out the DS bearing. I could feel some roughness in it when I spun the wheel while holding the ends of the axle with my hands, though I had not noticed anything while riding. It seemed kind of early (about 2000 miles in dry weather) for a hub bearing to show wear, but I suspect that I had set the preload too snug. With a new bearing in place, I've backed off the preload to where it just takes up the slack, and everything is smooth again.


  5. #5
    'brifter' is a lame word.
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    I'm not aware of any other hub that has the bearings located like that and uses a similar freehub design. The drive mechanism looks at first glance like it's a breakdown waiting to happen but I could be wrong. It is encased in a steel collar, right?

    I can't see any way that it would make you any faster, that's just not going to happen. If it works and you're satisfied with it, that's great...just don't make any crazy claims about it making you 'faster'. It's interesting (not in a good way) that you damaged a bearing in 2000mi. Was the hub not properly adjusted when you started using it? Most adjustable preload hubs will loosen up during break-in and even then the bearings will generally be fine.
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    Quote Originally Posted by cxwrench View Post
    I'm not aware of any other hub that has the bearings located like that and uses a similar freehub design. The drive mechanism looks at first glance like it's a breakdown waiting to happen but I could be wrong. It is encased in a steel collar, right?

    I can't see any way that it would make you any faster, that's just not going to happen. If it works and you're satisfied with it, that's great...just don't make any crazy claims about it making you 'faster'. It's interesting (not in a good way) that you damaged a bearing in 2000mi. Was the hub not properly adjusted when you started using it? Most adjustable preload hubs will loosen up during break-in and even then the bearings will generally be fine.
    Yes, the clutch mechanism is lined w/steel inside and out. That's why these hubs weigh 75g or so more than most others. If faster, only in the sense of a little less drag in coasting. I dunno about the bearing, but I suspect its on me bc I did mess with the preload early on.

    I like the hub. But my original question is about the arrangement of 4 bearings. Seems like the two outer bearings go directly to the axle, and the middle two allow the hub and freehub body to lean on each other with a rotating joint. Is that an unusual arrangement?

  7. #7
    'brifter' is a lame word.
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    Quote Originally Posted by bobf View Post
    Yes, the clutch mechanism is lined w/steel inside and out. That's why these hubs weigh 75g or so more than most others. If faster, only in the sense of a little less drag in coasting. I dunno about the bearing, but I suspect its on me bc I did mess with the preload early on.

    I like the hub. But my original question is about the arrangement of 4 bearings. Seems like the two outer bearings go directly to the axle, and the middle two allow the hub and freehub body to lean on each other with a rotating joint. Is that an unusual arrangement?
    As I said previously I've never seen another hub w/ the bearings arranged like yours. The normal arrangement is 2 bearings in the hubshell, one on each side and 2 in the freehub.



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  8. #8
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    It looks to me to be a very solid design. I would bet the hubs would be better of with a top line all steel bearing instead of ceramic hybrid. What is the size of the different bearings. Did you measure or get the bearing numbers? Are they pressed on? What special tools are needed?

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