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  1. #1
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    recommendation for UST disc rear wheel for commuting and touring

    i'm 170lbs. 99% of my bike miles are commuting. i'm tired of flats on my current winter bike setup and want to switch to 700x28 tubeless. looking for a recommendation for a wheel build that is budget friendly and durable. not concerned about weight. minimum 28 spokes, though 32 or 36 would work too.

    thanks

  2. #2
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    Hi Mike, and welcome to RBR!

    In order to recommend a wheel set, we would need to know what type of set up you have. Are your rotors centerlock or 6-bolt? What type of axles do you have? Quick release or thru-axle? You may want to read up and answer the questions in post #2 of this link so others can help you better:

    Wheels and Tires FAQ and helpful tips

    While tubeless will help prevent pinch flats, they won't necessarily prevent punctures due to road debris. If you search around these forums, you will see riders generally rave about running tubeless on their mountain bikes, but not on road bikes. At road bike tire pressures, if you hit something in the road that your sealant can't plug up, you may get a nice spray paint job of sealant on you and your bike.

    If pinch flats are a real problem due to bad roads, my next question would be can your bike fit wider tires like 700x32? If your punctures are due to road debris, may I suggest Maxxis Re-Fuse tires? These are nearly bombproof. Granted they ride a little more harsh than most road tires, but the only time I ever got a flat on these was after I wore my rear tire down pretty thin at 3K miles! And that's not bad life for a road tire.

    Good luck!
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by mikehelminger View Post
    i'm 170lbs. 99% of my bike miles are commuting. i'm tired of flats on my current winter bike setup and want to switch to 700x28 tubeless. looking for a recommendation for a wheel build that is budget friendly and durable. not concerned about weight. minimum 28 spokes, though 32 or 36 would work too.
    May not need new wheels for your desires.

    Try running gatorskin hardshells AND orange seal tubeless sealant in your tubes.

    - Use orange seal (amazon link). Don't think the more common and older Stans brand seals tubes.

    If your commutes are very cold, you may want to try the newer sub-zero orange seal formula. I think I had normal orange seal endurance freeze on a couple hour 28F or so ride. "I think" because the tire was flat when I got home - but held air fine after the bike got inside and warm.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by crit_boy View Post
    May not need new wheels for your desires.

    Try running gatorskin hardshells AND orange seal tubeless sealant in your tubes.

    - Use orange seal (amazon link). Don't think the more common and older Stans brand seals tubes.

    If your commutes are very cold, you may want to try the newer sub-zero orange seal formula. I think I had normal orange seal endurance freeze on a couple hour 28F or so ride. "I think" because the tire was flat when I got home - but held air fine after the bike got inside and warm.
    Or just new rims and spokes if you're hubs allow for getting what you want.

    I agree with the tougher tire choice. To go tubeless I'd want to make sure they eliminate close to 100% of the flats you get. Based of what I've seen from others I'd rather have 10 tube flats than 1 tubeless flat if commuting with anything close to work clothes on. Maybe the people I've seen don't know what they are doing but it's a big sloppy mess I wouldn't want to deal with going to work. But if you're just getting small punctures you should be fine and be able to live with the one-in-a-million so to speak.

  5. #5
    changingleaf
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    Like others have said, you may want to try one of the highly puncture resistant tires on the market such as gatorskins. Tubeless tires can be very good at preventing flats and are better at preventing pinch flats, but most of the tubeless road tires I've tried do not have a long tread life compared to tube-type commuting tires. There also is a bit of learning curve involved even with the best tire/rim combination.

  6. #6
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    If I was going tubeless, I'd want a tire with enough volume to allow a setup of less than 50-60 psi max. Probably means 35c+ tires. Higher PSI and tubeless just don't work as well.

    other thing to note about tubeless is that they tend to work better then the meat of the tire is still good (less than 50% wear). But once the rubber starts to wear beyond 50%, then chances of sealing becomes less, and continues to get worse as the rubber wears. So in effect, you don't really get the full useful life of a tubeless tire. Something to think about.

  7. #7
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    i am currently running a ryder 21 wheel that came stock with the bike. just had it trued for the first time in about 10k winter miles (rain in seattle).

    it has a 6 bolt pattern and a 160mm rotor.

    i'm intrigued by the idea of keeping the wheel and using a different tire like gatorskin (though, admittedly, i'm not a fan of GS from years ago).

    if you use the orange seal, are you just doing a conversion to road tubeless much like with the stans kit? i.e. you seal the spoke holes in the rim (i assume using the gorilla tape ghetto method), put on the tire with some orange seal in it, seat the tire, soap up the rims, and inflate away?

    is orange seal better than stans? i've used stans for about 10k miles on my other bike along with hutchinson fusion 3s (700x23) with a non UST rim. normally they work perfect except for when nearing the end of their useful life - then they start flatting out.

    for winter commuting, i would prefer 28s and it seems like the tubeless tire industry isn't quite there yet.

    i know many cite concerns about tubeless blowing off the rims at high pressure, so i am curious how the suggestion to use a gatorskin + orange seal will prevent that.

  8. #8
    wheelbuilder
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    Quote Originally Posted by aclinjury View Post
    If I was going tubeless, I'd want a tire with enough volume to allow a setup of less than 50-60 psi max. Probably means 35c+ tires. Higher PSI and tubeless just don't work as well.
    Lower pressure is definitely better. A great tire to look out for is the Panaracer Gravel King. It's a slick tread and has a flat protection belt. It's tubeless from 30mm and wider.

    I run the 650bX42 myself.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by mikehelminger View Post

    i'm intrigued by the idea of keeping the wheel and using a different tire like gatorskin (though, admittedly, i'm not a fan of GS from years ago).
    Gatorskins are MORE puncture resistant than most "race" tires, but they aren't the most puncture resistant you can get. For less $$ and much better puncture resistance, go with the Maxxis Re-Fuse and forget about tubeless:

    Maxxis Re-Fuse Folding Road Tire | Jenson USA

    https://www.bikeinn.com/bike/maxxis-...E&gclsrc=aw.ds


    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



  10. #10
    changingleaf
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    It's not a good idea to run a standard tire as tubeless. You can usually get them to seal, but the bead is not strong enough and the tire will blow off the rim at higher pressures.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by mikehelminger View Post
    if you use the orange seal, are you just doing a conversion to road tubeless much like with the stans kit? i.e. you seal the spoke holes in the rim (i assume using the gorilla tape ghetto method), put on the tire with some orange seal in it, seat the tire, soap up the rims, and inflate away?

    is orange seal better than stans? i've used stans for about 10k miles on my other bike along with hutchinson fusion 3s (700x23) with a non UST rim. normally they work perfect except for when nearing the end of their useful life - then they start flatting out.

    i know many cite concerns about tubeless blowing off the rims at high pressure, so i am curious how the suggestion to use a gatorskin + orange seal will prevent that.
    Re orange seal in tubes: Do not run tubeless on non-tubeless wheels.

    You just put the orange seal in your tubes. Remove the valve core, add sealant, replace the valve core, inflate tube as normal.

    Orange seal will seal butyl and latex tubes. I do not believe stans will seal latex at all and will not seal butyl as well.

    Re orange seal vs stans: All sealants dry up over time. You have to re-add them to the tire/tube. IME, stans does not seal as well and dries up much faster.

    I switched a few years ago after I removed a tire that had been running and re-adding stans for over a year or so. Stans dries into large clumps of latex, aka "Stanimals" - google it.

    Orange seal dries into a coating that evenly covers the inside of the tire. Like a latex tube formed into the inner surface. No free moving latex clumps.

    TL;DR - Put orange seal sealant in your tubes as they are on your bike, re-inflate the tubes in the tires, and commute.

  12. #12
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    if orange seal dries, how does it seal a puncture? or, are you talking about long-term (120 day) drying?

    do you just remove the valve core with the same core removal tool that stan's sells?

    seems TGTBT.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by mikehelminger View Post
    if orange seal dries, how does it seal a puncture? or, are you talking about long-term (120 day) drying?

    do you just remove the valve core with the same core removal tool that stan's sells?

    seems TGTBT.
    It dries out over 6 to 8 months.

    Tubes have to have removable cores.

    You do not have to have a special valve core removal tool. I use needle nose pliers. A valve core removal tool is nice. But, not necessary.

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