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  1. #1
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    Recommended tubeless tire for heavy rider? 700x32c

    Im about to receive a new bike very soon, Trek Domane, and it comes with Bontrager R3 Hard-Case Lite, 120tpi, aramid bead tires. I am 275+ and I did purchase some new rims Hed Belgium + 32/32 and Im looking for a recommended tire?

    While the internet search points to Schwalbe Pro One... it looks like it stops at 28c and Im hoping to stick with 32c. Any recommendations that I can use at 32c?

    Also, what tire pressure would you recommend to pump? This part is also becoming a little bit of a dilemma because im reading that for tubeless... it is normally recommended to get an air compressor vs just a standard high volume pump? I dont plan on filling the sealant myself but I will just take it into the store until I feel comfortable enough to do that on my own.

  2. #2
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    Being pretty heavy myself ( I was once over 300lbs), I would suggest getting some 28mm or 32mm Conti 4 seasons and put tubes in them. I rode the 28's for 20k miles with tubes are rarely flatted, and never pinch flatted. I rode them at between 90 and 100 psi rear, and a little less in front.

    The problem with asking others what tire pressure to use is, you have no context for where or how they ride. Some people just ride heavy, thudding over every bump and trash wheels and tires. Others just have a lighter touch and are more adept at avoiding heavy hits and have wheels and tires that last a long time.

    Assuming you are riding clean tarmac, I would suggest starting out with a high quality reliable tire with a tube in it. Start the pressure fairly high on the first few rides, and then start working your way down to lower pressures you feel comfortable with and not risk a pinch flat.

    For the smooth clean pavement I did most of my riding on, i rode at about 90r/80f on my road bike most of the time. That was the pressure that i felt like I wasn't risking a pinch flat if I hit a small bump. Think the end of the driveway, or a large crack the pavement. I always avoid anything large enough to damage a wheel at speed.

    Again, I stress, your mileage can and will vary. Tire pressure is nearly as personal as your seat

    Put some miles on stadard tires and tubes while you ponder your options for tubeless. The last thing you want to be doing is experimenting with a bunch of different options, and swapping tires with sealant when you first start riding.

    Going from tubes to tubeless later is easy, once you find your tire/pressure setup you like. If you try a tubeless tire and hate it, and can't find other options, going back to tubes is a lot more work.

    FWIW, I tried Schwalbe Pro One's set up tubeless last spring on my road bike and had problems with the sidewalls being cut far too easily. After going through several of them, I cleaned everything up and went back to standard tubes and tires (Conti GP4000 SII in summer, and Conti 4 Seasons in Winter). I do use tubeless on my dedicated gravel bike, and have a set of 'gravel wheels' for my road bike that I have set up tubeless, but not with road tires. My gravel tires are Clement Strada USH (32) and Clement X'Plor USH (37). These are knobby, so not suitable for dedicated road use.

  3. #3
    Clydesdale Viejo
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    Over the past year I've dropped from 275# to 235# riding on 28c 4Seasons with tubes @100psi w/o any flats( +/- 9k km ). Just built up new groadie running Vitorria Cross XN Pro II tires on tubeless ready 32h rims running tubes at 75psi- with jury still out on verdict though no flats so far after 1k km.

    Used 25c GP4000 II's prior to the 4Seasons, they road good as well. Though I could really feel the added volume of the 28c 4Seasons. Will definitely buy the 4Seasons in 28c again when needed. Surface tarmac was moderate to course chip seal roads in Oregon and Mexico.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Migen21 View Post

    The problem with asking others what tire pressure to use is, you have no context for where or how they ride. Some people just ride heavy, thudding over every bump and trash wheels and tires. Others just have a lighter touch and are more adept at avoiding heavy hits and have wheels and tires that last a long time.

    Assuming you are riding clean tarmac, I would suggest starting out with a high quality reliable tire with a tube in it. Start the pressure fairly high on the first few rides, and then start working your way down to lower pressures you feel comfortable with and not risk a pinch flat.
    Migen... as always I appreciate your info and knowledge. My thoughts in regards to starting tubeless are for the technical reasons of using tubeless. I could start out at lower pressures without having the "higher concerns" of getting pinch flats. While riding tubes on 32s is VERY different than my previous experience in riding tubes on 23s should be a deciding factor... I thought that my backup plan is to carry a tube in case something does go wrong to get back home.

    I want to say that Im pretty "light" on my tires because my biggest fear was pinch flats with 23s and I think I will still have that thinking on my new bike and I plan on riding only standard roads for quite awhile until I hit a certain weight... I do understand that its hard to ascertain any specific knowledge for my context. I am not sure how difficult going from tube to tubeless will be or if there is an extreme concern to go tubeless immediately other than the amount of choices out there. But taking your post into consideration... I may just start with tubes since there are a larger choice of 32c tires.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by wpod View Post

    Used 25c GP4000 II's prior to the 4Seasons, they road good as well. Though I could really feel the added volume of the 28c 4Seasons. Will definitely buy the 4Seasons in 28c again when needed. Surface tarmac was moderate to course chip seal roads in Oregon and Mexico.
    wpod... thank you for your experience. Im sure going tubes with a larger choice of tire selection in the 32c range may be the route Im going to find myself in...

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