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  1. #26
    pmf
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    Quote Originally Posted by hebecb View Post
    You guys are awesome thanks!

    Based on your thoughts (here and elsewhere), I'm going with HED Belgium + WI CLD (in blue!) with 32H front and back.
    You might not need 32f/32r. The folks who built my wheels (psimet) recommended 24f/28r and I weigh 200 lbs. I asked about 32/32 and the owner said it won't be any stronger of a wheel. I've been riding one pair for a few years now and they're perfectly true.

  2. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    Good choices Hebecb!

    Now, which spokes and nipples are you going to get?
    Well you guys scared me off the annodized alloys otherwise I probably would have gone with blue alloy nips but now i'm thinking silver (perhaps DT double butted) spokes and black brass... for some reason the silver spokes feel right for my Ti (sandblasted) frame.

  3. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by hebecb View Post
    Well you guys scared me off the annodized alloys otherwise I probably would have gone with blue alloy nips but now i'm thinking silver (perhaps DT double butted) spokes and black brass... for some reason the silver spokes feel right for my Ti (sandblasted) frame.
    Brass nips and double butted spokes - more good choices!
    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein

    "Beware of geeks bearing formulas."
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    "Education is what you get when you read the fine print. Experience is what you get when you don't. -- Pete Seeger



  4. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by pmf View Post
    You might not need 32f/32r. The folks who built my wheels (psimet) recommended 24f/28r and I weigh 200 lbs. I asked about 32/32 and the owner said it won't be any stronger of a wheel. I've been riding one pair for a few years now and they're perfectly true.
    24/28 is fine for rim brake wheels. For disc, I would advise 32/32.
    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein

    "Beware of geeks bearing formulas."
    -- Warren Buffett

    "Education is what you get when you read the fine print. Experience is what you get when you don't. -- Pete Seeger



  5. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    Brass nips and double butted spokes - more good choices!
    I've had good advice ;-)

  6. #31
    pmf
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    24/28 is fine for rim brake wheels. For disc, I would advise 32/32.
    Why is that? Just curious.

    I don't get this disc brake thing, but to each his own.

  7. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    24/28 is fine for rim brake wheels. For disc, I would advise 32/32.
    Exactly. Although I've had some folks suggest lower even for disc brakes, i'm concerned about the extra stresses of disc brakes so...

    These are gonna be all-around wheels for a while. I do a number of supported double centuries and other rides where I might be willing to try a lighter wheelset (and this way I may be able to demo some before pulling the trigger).

  8. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by pmf View Post
    Why is that? Just curious.

    I don't get this disc brake thing, but to each his own.
    According to my research, disc brakes put more stress on the spokes near the hub.

    As for why.... while I don't do much rain riding (NorCal it's compressed into a few months) I do have a lot of long twisty descents. The improved reliability of braking pressure as well as no longer having to worry about rim heat-ups is what drew me towards disc brakes.

    I'm not a "weight weenie" so that's not as much of a concern (though for the really long hilly rides it's a bummer) and I have another way to shed 2-3 pounds if I need to ;-)

  9. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by pmf View Post
    Why is that? Just curious.

    I don't get this disc brake thing, but to each his own.
    Hebecb answered this pretty well.
    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein

    "Beware of geeks bearing formulas."
    -- Warren Buffett

    "Education is what you get when you read the fine print. Experience is what you get when you don't. -- Pete Seeger



  10. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    24/28 is fine for rim brake wheels. For disc, I would advise 32/32.
    I dont disagree about more stress, but I have yet to see a wheel where someone said a spoke broke when I was grabbing the brake. Not to say it hasn't happened. I'm sure tandeems and tourings bikes could give issue. But I have yet to see a it with normal bikes with disc.

  11. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Enoch562 View Post
    I dont disagree about more stress, but I have yet to see a wheel where someone said a spoke broke when I was grabbing the brake. Not to say it hasn't happened. I'm sure tandeems and tourings bikes could give issue. But I have yet to see a it with normal bikes with disc.
    Perhaps but.... I run 32 front and back now with my rim brakes. They are strong and true. I've decided not to go lower upon moving to the new brake system

  12. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Enoch562 View Post
    I dont disagree about more stress, but I have yet to see a wheel where someone said a spoke broke when I was grabbing the brake. Not to say it hasn't happened. I'm sure tandeems and tourings bikes could give issue. But I have yet to see a it with normal bikes with disc.
    But how many disc brake wheels exist that have less than 28 spokes? Note that new Cannondale Synapse rim brake bikes used to come with 16/20 spoke wheels. Their disc brake versions come with at least 28/28 spoke wheels.
    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein

    "Beware of geeks bearing formulas."
    -- Warren Buffett

    "Education is what you get when you read the fine print. Experience is what you get when you don't. -- Pete Seeger



  13. #38
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    I'd never use what OEM wheel sets are doing as a proxy for what anyone should do. They are designed with two things in mind - to be useful on every size of bike in that model's range for every weight of rider who might ride one, and aesthetics.

    Disc brake rear wheels are somewhat stronger than rim brake wheels, spoke for spoke. Flange spacing is 5mm wider on disc wheels (assuming 135mm OLD spacing), and that 5mm makes a ton of difference.

    Disc brake front wheels are somewhat weaker than rim brake wheels, spoke for spoke. Flange spacing is narrower (still 100mm OLD, but you need to fit a rotor in there) and the wheel is dished. Front wheels are pretty freaking strong anyway.

    24/28 disc wheels can have a ton of applicability, as can other combos. I've raced two cross seasons on 24/24 without having to do anything to the wheels, except that now I have to replace a rear rim because I ride a cross bike like a bull in a china shop and the rear rim is dented like crazy.

  14. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    But how many disc brake wheels exist that have less than 28 spokes? Note that new Cannondale Synapse rim brake bikes used to come with 16/20 spoke wheels. Their disc brake versions come with at least 28/28 spoke wheels.
    24/28 seems to be the most common build I run into. I'm sure Nove Dave has a plethora of them out there. Most of the Zipps I see are 24/24. Its the whole I need more spokes for a disc road bike thing I dont agree with. I'm all for more spokes, but it just doesn't seem to be a issue.

  15. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by Enoch562 View Post
    24/28 seems to be the most common build I run into. I'm sure Nove Dave has a plethora of them out there. Most of the Zipps I see are 24/24. Its the whole I need more spokes for a disc road bike thing I dont agree with. I'm all for more spokes, but it just doesn't seem to be a issue.
    FWIW, I reached out to "November Dave" earlier in the process and he had suggested 24/28 for me (185lbs). In the end I went the conservative route (and LBS route too.... sorry Dave ) and stuck with the same spoke count I have now (guess I said that above already).

    I will, most likely, pick up an additional set of wheels at a later date and try lower spoke counts on those (and use them for local or supported rides). Hopefully I live to tell the tale of how they stack up

  16. #41
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    I'm no expert.....but. if you are a big guy (I am). Your spending a good chunk of money on a set of wheels. With hubs you are hoping to be riding for many years. At least in my case. I would tend to be conservative. Because once you make the decision, you kind of stuck, for lack of a better term. I'm looking to have a nice set of wheels built for my new bike. But everybody's priorities are different. I'm leaning towards Chris King if I can afford them on the hubs, if not, will probably go with DT.

  17. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tallboy1959 View Post
    I'm no expert.....but. if you are a big guy (I am). Your spending a good chunk of money on a set of wheels. With hubs you are hoping to be riding for many years. At least in my case. I would tend to be conservative. Because once you make the decision, you kind of stuck, for lack of a better term.
    Exactly. Or to put it another way, what are you going to gain by having 4 or either 8 fewer spokes? 30-60g less weight is not going to make you go noticeably faster.

    Quote Originally Posted by Tallboy1959 View Post
    I'm leaning towards Chris King if I can afford them on the hubs, if not, will probably go with DT.
    If I were you, I would take a serious look at White Industries hubs. Unlike Chris King, DT and just about all other boutique hubs, White Industries have a Ti freehub body rather than aluminum. If you are a strong or heavy rider, an aluminum freehub is prone to gouging by the cassette.
    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein

    "Beware of geeks bearing formulas."
    -- Warren Buffett

    "Education is what you get when you read the fine print. Experience is what you get when you don't. -- Pete Seeger



  18. #43
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    Thank you very much.....that, I didn't know.

  19. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    If I were you, I would take a serious look at White Industries hubs. Unlike Chris King, DT and just about all other boutique hubs, White Industries have a Ti freehub body rather than aluminum. If you are a strong or heavy rider, an aluminum freehub is prone to gouging by the cassette.
    This is exactly why I went with WI hubs.

  20. #45
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    When the freehub gets gouged, you/mechanic files down the grooves. At some point you replace the freehub. It's very simple. Do use a cassette with a spider freehub mount, not the cheaper cassettes with the cogs just pinned together.
    Hey everybody, ride my wheels! They ride good, real good.
    I'm a wheel builder. SRLPE Wheel Works. Send me a PM.

  21. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by 4slomo View Post
    When the freehub gets gouged, you/mechanic files down the grooves. At some point you replace the freehub. It's very simple.
    Wouldn't it be even simpler to just not use the hub that causes this problem in the first place?
    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein

    "Beware of geeks bearing formulas."
    -- Warren Buffett

    "Education is what you get when you read the fine print. Experience is what you get when you don't. -- Pete Seeger



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