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  1. #1
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    Tubeless tire opinions?

    Goathead season in full swing where I ride in NorCal central valley, already have two flats this month on Conti 4Ks. Going to try tubeless, like the idea of pulling out the thorn and having the tire seal. I've had Conti 4K sidewall blowouts, the most recent both front/back tires on a big pothole at mile 20 of my first double century. Understand the risk/mess with tubeless if that happens.

    Currently looking at:
    - Hutchinson Sector 28
    - Maxxis Padrone
    - Schwalbe Pro One

    Riding 120-150 miles a week, prefer a little more durability (Sector 28) over performance (Pro One).

    I've got a 2015 Trek Domane with Enve 5.6 wheels (28mm outer), rear chainstay can comfortably fit up to 30mm inflated tire. I've tried 28mm Conti 4Ks on the stock Bontrager wheels and at 31mm inflated thats a little tight.

    Opinions? Planning to switch back to the Contis in December.
    Last edited by 2nfinite; 08-11-2017 at 04:27 PM.

  2. #2
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    I ride Schwalbe Pro One's and they are a bit thin, but very light and roll well.

    I would say they would be a better tire overall with a bit more rubber on them to help plug holes when you get them. With that said, even with glass cuts, I've never gone completely flat ... Usually seals up around 40 psi on big cuts, allowing me to ride home.

    Then, I'll patch the tire with a tube patch ... same way you would patch a tube ... put the tire back on and I'm good to go.

    For winter, I'll be looking at something thicker overall, like the Hutchinson or IRC tires. I also recently switched to Orange Seal, which should seal bigger holes and seal smaller holes faster than regular Stan's ... so that will help a bit also.
    Bikes:
    • 2017 Giant TCR Advanced Disc
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  3. #3
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    Look into the panaracers evo A available from excel sports for an excellent price. I just got a pair. They roll very well and are quite supple. A bit on the heavy side but you need that extra rubber for sealing. The 25s run 24 mm width on 23 mm rims, so I will be sizing up whenever I get another pair.

    I have the schwalbe pro ones as well - they roll delightfully but are a bit on the fragile side. I've already seen a couple of friends flat unexpectedly. I restrict them to racing and training rides close to home.

    I have way more confidence in the panaracers and have no worries about slamming them into potholes or taking them onto the lousiest dirt roads. Not as fast or supple as the schwalbes but no slouches either. Much nicer ride than contis, IMO.

  4. #4
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    Compass is another brand of great riding tires (I believe they are made by Panaracer to Compass' specs).

    I've not used the narrower high pressure tires, but the 35mm bon jon pass, and the 38mm barlow pass are great rolling tires and are easy to set up (at least on my HED Belgium Plus and Ardennes rims).

    I did not care for the Sector 28s, but mainly just because they were much harsher riding and much more difficult to mount than the others I mentioned. I took them off after two rides and gave them to a "friend"

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wookiebiker View Post
    Then, I'll patch the tire with a tube patch ... same way you would patch a tube ... put the tire back on and I'm good to go.
    Interesting, how big of a patch?

  6. #6
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    Just a regular tube patch ... small circular patch. It works great and keeps you from having to discard a good tire. I clean and scuff the area before applying the glue, then wait for it to dry, then apply the patch ... just like you would a tube.

    If there is a small bulge or gap at the hole, a little superglue will bring it back together, as well as pull small slits in the tire back together.
    Bikes:
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  7. #7
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    As someone with ~25K miles of road tubeless experience who's tried many brands and product versions, I find Maxxis and IRC tires to be a good compromise between race day performance, durability and cost. I have run these year round with zero issues (Colorado). Note: Maxxis Padrone tires run very small for their size, so buy one size larger to get an effective width similar to most other brands.

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