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  1. #1
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    road tubeless - what to carry on bike?

    I bought a set of Ultegra 6700 tubeless wheels a few months ago and have been running Conti GP4000s with tubes. Tore a sidewall in a crash and have to replace a tire so am considering going tubeless and trying the Hutchinson Fusion 3 with caffelatex (what my LBS recommended). I live in the desert so understand I will need to clean out the 'rubber bands' every couple/few months and add new caffelatex. I may have my LBS do the initial setup while I watch.

    What do you tubeless guys carry with you on the bike? The Hutchinson Fast'air aeresol can? The Repair'air kit? A spare tube? All of the above? Honestly, this is what is keeping me from making the switch. Just not confident about getting myself home in the event of a flat that doesn't self-seal and not sure what to pack. The roads I ride are mostly smooth and have little to medium debris. With the Contis, I have only flatted 3-4 times a year (not counting the crash!).



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    Last edited by BigBadConrad; 05-27-2012 at 08:39 PM.
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  2. #2
    classiquesklassieker
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigBadConrad View Post
    I bought a set of Ultegra 6700 tubeless wheels a few months ago and have been running Conti GP4000s with tubes. Tore a sidewall in a crash and have to replace a tire so am considering going tubeless and trying the Hutchinson Fusion 3 with caffelatex (what my LBS recommended). I live in the desert so understand I will need to clean out the 'rubber bands' every couple/few months and add new caffelatex. I may have my LBS do the initial setup while I watch.

    What do you tubeless guys carry with you on the bike? The Hutchinson Fast'air aeresol can? The Repair'air kit? A spare tube and regular presta valves? All of the above? Honestly, this is what is keeping me from making the switch. Just not confident about getting myself home in the event of a flat that doesn't self-seal and not sure what to pack. The roads I ride are mostly smooth and have little to medium debris. With the Contis, I have only flatted 3-4 times a year (not counting the crash!).



    Thanks,
    BBC
    If the sealant in your tire doesn't seal the leak, then a Fast'air isn't likely to fare much better. I just carry spare tube and pump, and good tire levers. I've had to fix a flat several times, each time I just stick a tube in.

  3. #3
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    Haven't had a flat yet. Would run stan's and not caffelatex as a lot of people have had it just bubble and not seal. In my kit I have a tiny multi-tool, park levers, spare tube, lezyne co2 chuck and one co2 cartridge. I also think there might be a small patch kit incase someone else on the road needs it. I'm never far from help/shops since it's very urban area near the beach.

  4. #4
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    I use as little sealant as possible when setting up (1/2 the hutchinson recommended dose). I carry a spare tube, C02 and lever to fix flats. Nothing fancy.

    I suggest you put the tire on the wheel. It will be good for you to know the difficulty of getting that bead over the rim. Then you'll know what to expect on the side of the road. Of course it's much easier to fill the tire with an air compressor. So even if you get the tire on, the shop should air it up.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by NWS Alpine View Post
    Would run stan's and not caffelatex as a lot of people have had it just bubble and not seal.
    I switched from Stan's to Caffelatex a couple of months ago, and that has definitely not been my experience. I've already had three incidences where Caffelatex sealed effectively with minimal air loss. Additionally Caffelatex is supposed to be less corrosive than Stan's and can be injected through normal, non core removable valves. In my book, it's a winner!

    To answer the original question, I carry two tubes and a patch kit just in case things really got bad. Additionally, I've had a very positive experience with Maxxis Padrones tubeless tires.

  6. #6
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    Carry the same stuff you would for a tubed tire

    Pump, co2 cartridge, tire irons, spare tube, patch kit, and boot

    If you flat treat your tire just like it had a tube in it,

    If you have sealant in the tire, remove the tire vertically, and let it sit in the bottom of the tire

    You will also have to remove the valve from the rim

    Stan's seals small holes faster, it is essentially a bunch of little particles suspended in a solution

    Caffee latex seals holes more permanently, dries out to a rubber consistency

    I personally have mixed them

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by purdyd View Post
    Carry the same stuff you would for a tubed tire.
    ^This!

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by purdyd View Post
    You will also have to remove the valve from the rim
    How difficult is that? Do you need needlenose pliers or anything like that? By the way, does the thin rubber ring toward the center/bottom of this photo go below the rim?
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails road tubeless - what to carry on bike?-img_0068.jpg  
    Last edited by BigBadConrad; 05-27-2012 at 11:12 PM.
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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigBadConrad View Post
    How difficult is that? Do you need needlenose pliers or anything like that? By the way, does the thin rubber ring in the center of this photo go above or below the rim?
    The difficulty depends on how tight you put it on to start with. As for your 2nd question, the order is: tubeless valve --> rim --> O-ring --> tightening nut. For the rear tire it is: tubeless valve --> rim --> shim --> O-ring --> tightening nut. See here: http://techdocs.shimano.com/media/te...9830748435.pdf

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by purdyd View Post
    Carry the same stuff you would for a tubed tire
    Same for me. If the Stans doesn't seal it I chuck a tube in and patch the tyre at home.
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  11. #11
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    The valve screw only needs to hand tight, no needle nose requires

    If you use one of the latex sealants and let all of it dry out, it can be a bit difficult

    If you use sealant, get Stan's valves with the removable valve and the syringe for inserting sealant

  12. #12
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    I carried that aerosol can stuff and it didn't work well at all. I just carries a patch kit and would seal any puncture on the inside. Filled the tire and went. That's it and I never had a problem or needed more.

  13. #13
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    Is there such thing as ghetto/gorilla tape Tubeless for road bike rims like you can do with MTB rims? Just curious.

  14. #14
    pmt
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    Like others said, mostly the same stuff. Glueless patches, acetone, small cloth, tire levers, and CO2 will fix most of what the sealant won't catch.

    For a bad cut, dollar bill boot and a tube.

  15. #15
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    Carry the exact same thing you would carry with a tubed setup.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigBadConrad View Post
    How difficult is that? Do you need needlenose pliers or anything like that? By the way, does the thin rubber ring toward the center/bottom of this photo go below the rim?
    Did this get answered for you? That is the shimano presta for Front wheel. The rubber ring goes above the rim below the nut. You'll notice the Shimano Rear wheel presta has an additional canting piece that is used for rear wheel offset rim (note, rubber ring goes above this part). FWIW, I replaced the Shimano stock parts with Stans removable valve cores (easier for sealant...but as earlier mentioned...I run about 1/2 oz Caflx per wheel...just enough to help bead set up at altitude here in CO) while still using the Shimano rubber rings for F/B wheel as well as the Rear wheel canting parts. Note, those rubber rings help to prevent a "lock down" so you can remove with your fingers. Note: I ride Wh da 7900 c24 TL

    *Edit...Yes, with another look, post 9 answered you well.

  17. #17
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    I suggest doing a test. let all the air out of the tubeless tire, then see if you can pump air into it with your hand pump. If you can then all you really need is the same equipment that you would carry for a stardard tire/tube setup and you wouldn't necessarily need to carry CO2, unless you wanbt to.
    I suspect that since you bought specific tubeless rims you might be able to. If you can't then you need to carry CO2 inflater (along with all the other stuff that people have mentioned) so you can get the air into the tire fast enough to seal the bead.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by martinrjensen View Post
    I suggest doing a test. let all the air out of the tubeless tire, then see if you can pump air into it with your hand pump. If you can then all you really need is the same equipment that you would carry for a stardard tire/tube setup and you wouldn't necessarily need to carry CO2, unless you wanbt to.
    I suspect that since you bought specific tubeless rims you might be able to. If you can't then you need to carry CO2 inflater (along with all the other stuff that people have mentioned) so you can get the air into the tire fast enough to seal the bead.
    I think I must get more flats than most people, or maybe I ride more but

    My experience would be the Stan's are the easiest to seal

    The shimanos, not so much

    If you are going to do the test, try removing and remounting the tire

    Personally, I would not rely on being able to reseal a tubeless tire in the field with just a frame mount pump or co2

    Always carry a tube, a boot, patch kit, and depending on the wheel and your hand strength, plastic tire irons

    I think having co2 is a good idea, and always carry a pump of some sort

    They same thing you carry with a tubed setup

    I frequently have used my tube to help some one else out, more so than myself

  19. #19
    pmt
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    Quote Originally Posted by purdyd View Post
    Personally, I would not rely on being able to reseal a tubeless tire in the field with (snip) co2
    I've done it a bunch of times; it's easy.

  20. #20
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    put a shop air compressor & a bucket of soapy water in a burley bike trailer & hook it to your bike.

    Shop air is the only thing that would lock the bead correctly on the tubeless wheels I had.
    On the upside, think how fit you'll get hauling that up hills. You'll also be a hero to anyone you come across with a roadside flat

  21. #21
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    Get hands on with it.

    Do the install yourself or your LBS can do it but then ask to unseat the tire and seat it yourself. Some tire/rim combos will be super tight and you need to know what you have. I ride Fulcrum Racing Zeros (2-way) and with Hutchinson Intensive's and I will snap anything other than a Pedros yellow tire lever trying to get the tire seated. Knowing that, I ride with two Pedros yellow tire levers, spare tube, and pump.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by pmt View Post
    I've done it a bunch of times; it's easy.
    Ditto. I usually use CO2 even in the garage, because I'm lazy. Works great.

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