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  1. #1
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    Schwalbe One Tubeless tire rolling resistance test

    interesting test on the "gold standard" of tubeless road tire.

    Schwalbe One Tubeless Rolling Resistance Review

    rolling resistance is good, but not as good as Schwalbe claims.

    And rolling resistance decreases the higher in PSI you go (and please no more saying "lower psi offers better rolling").

  2. #2
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    That test is 3 years old. Tire has been superseded by the pro one. Can't buy ones tubeless any more.

    And yes, lower psi leads to better rolling. The ones have very stiff sidewalls and need to be run at low pressure for optimum rolling.

  3. #3
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    oh! i need to update my info. I wonder how's the pro one compare then? Pro one rolls better at lower psi? Test data?

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  5. #5
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    Ok I did some looking found that on the same site that did the test of the original One, they also did a test on the Pro One, and here's their result on Pro One:

    Schwalbe Pro One Tubeless Rolling Resistance Review

    And it looks like that rolling resistance decreases with increasing pressure. So is there another test that shows rolling resistance decreases with decreasing pressure? To be specific, I'm talking about rolling resistance (something measurable) and not "rolling comfort" (something subjective). So when people say lower psi rolls better, what exactly are they measuring as "better"?

    The new Pro One comes in at 11.0W of resistance, versus the older One at 11.8W

    Interestingly, the article mentions that the Conti 4000S II with a butyl tube has a rolling resistance of 12.2W, but with a latex tube it's reduced to 10.6W, that's a massive decrease in my view.

  6. #6
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    Every test will show rolling resistance decreasing with increasing pressure for every road tire. They're measuring the hysteresis properties of the rubber and casing.

    There's no standard test to incorporate the effects of real surfaces.

    There is evidence to show that there is a breakpoint at which resistance increases as pressure increases. There is some debate as to what pressure level this breakpoint will be found and its relationship to surface properties and wheel speed.

    Silica has some interesting observations on their blog.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by carlosflanders View Post
    Every test will show rolling resistance decreasing with increasing pressure for every road tire. They're measuring the hysteresis properties of the rubber and casing.

    There's no standard test to incorporate the effects of real surfaces.

    There is evidence to show that there is a breakpoint at which resistance increases as pressure increases. There is some debate as to what pressure level this breakpoint will be found and its relationship to surface properties and wheel speed.

    Silica has some interesting observations on their blog.
    Thank you for the info. AFAIK, all of these rolling tests use the metal drum with roughen surfaces to simulate "road condition". Whether this simulation is accurate, and to what degree, is up for debate.

    What I'm thinking now is to use a wide tire (25mm) but at around the same psi as I use on the 23mm tires (maybe 5-10 psi lower at max). Since the roads i'm riding on are almost always smooth, I don't want to lower the psi by 20+ and create a higher rolling resistance

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by aclinjury View Post
    AFAIK, all of these rolling tests use the metal drum with roughen surfaces to simulate "road condition". Whether this simulation is accurate, and to what degree, is up for debate.
    It's not clear how these "rough drum" tests translate into the actual suspension losses we experience when riding. With the wheel fixed in relation to the drum, there is no "bounce" of the wheel as it hits a rough surface, so drum tests only measure casing flex.

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