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  1. #1
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    Spoke J-bends not sharp enough????

    Iím building a set of wheels, and Iím finding that the spoke J-bends are not sharp enough! The spokes wonít sit flush. What in the blue hell is going on??????? I swear to god, looking at the J-bends, the angle appears to be less than 90-degrees on all of the spokes I ordered.

    Are there special J-bend angles too????

    These are DT Swiss aero spokes.

  2. #2
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    Spokes are malleable enough so that they will form to fit the hub when under tension.
    By the time you finish building the wheel, they should be fine. If you find otherwise, post a photo so we can see what you're seeing.

  3. #3
    A wheelist
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    This is normal. The spokes on the outside of the hub, during the building phase, need their bend adjusting so you get a more straight line to the rim. I mention this on my wheelbuilding site. When lacing the outer spoke to the rim, bend the spoke down with the thumb as it passes over the hub flange. When the spokes have a small amount of tension on them I tap the bends flatter with a rubber tipped hammer. On my site you can see a photo of the result of this. It shows the two bends of inner and outer spokes after they have been set (in a fully tensioned and properly built wheel) and removed. The is why, if you rebuild a wheel using the old spokes, the spokes should be re-used in their original orientation.
    .
    Mike T's home wheelbuilding site - dedicated to providing Newby wheelbuilders with motivation, information and resources.

  4. #4
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    Precisely this^

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike T. View Post
    This is normal. The spokes on the outside of the hub, during the building phase, need their bend adjusting so you get a more straight line to the rim. I mention this on my wheelbuilding site. When lacing the outer spoke to the rim, bend the spoke down with the thumb as it passes over the hub flange. When the spokes have a small amount of tension on them I tap the bends flatter with a rubber tipped hammer. On my site you can see a photo of the result of this. It shows the two bends of inner and outer spokes after they have been set (in a fully tensioned and properly built wheel) and removed. The is why, if you rebuild a wheel using the old spokes, the spokes should be re-used in their original orientation.
    ^This^

    This is also explained in Roger Musson's awesome e-book which you should get if you haven't already. $12 with free updates for life. Best investment you will ever make:

    https://www.wheelpro.co.uk/wheelbuilding/book.php
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    ďStatistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.Ē -- Aaron Levenstein



  6. #6
    A wheelist
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    ^This^

    This is also explained in Roger Musson's awesome e-book which you should get if you haven't already. $12 with free updates for life. Best investment you will ever make:

    https://www.wheelpro.co.uk/wheelbuilding/book.php
    ^^^ That. What I should add to my post above is this - the curvy bend of the heads-in spoke should be pushed flat or tapped flat rather than leave it to spoke tension pulling it flat. If we don't remove this curve by taking the spoke past its plastic yield point, the curve is still there in the metal's memory and it will always want to be reverting to its original state, thus fighting the wheel-build. It should be our goal to "optimize" the spoke's relationship with the wheel in every way we can, depending on the time we can spend on a wheel - which in the case of us home hobby wheelbuilders is relatively unlimited.
    .
    Mike T's home wheelbuilding site - dedicated to providing Newby wheelbuilders with motivation, information and resources.

  7. #7
    A wheelist
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    Quote Originally Posted by November Dave View Post
    Precisely this^
    Thanks for your affirmation Dave. From you, this means lots.
    .
    Mike T's home wheelbuilding site - dedicated to providing Newby wheelbuilders with motivation, information and resources.

  8. #8
    Russian Troll Farmer
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    Oh, boy....the joys of building your first wheel......
    "L'enfer, c'est les autres"

  9. #9
    Wheel Builder
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    Quote Originally Posted by Waspinator View Post
    Iím building a set of wheels, and Iím finding that the spoke J-bends are not sharp enough! The spokes wonít sit flush. What in the blue hell is going on??????? I swear to god, looking at the J-bends, the angle appears to be less than 90-degrees on all of the spokes I ordered.

    Are there special J-bend angles too????

    These are DT Swiss aero spokes.
    Is it the spokes of the hub? Some hub flanges are "too" thick, preventing most J Bend spokes from angling naturally. Or some hubs, (Dura-Ace), have spoke holes that are drilled super tight, so you really have to pull the spoke around and in line by hand, or however, while lacing the wheel, (but definitely before it's built). And in the worst case scenario, some hubs have tight hole drillings, and the holes are not chamfered.

    What hubs did you say you were using?

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