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  1. #1
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    Sram S60's making metallic noise?

    Every time I hit a corner or if I get up off my saddle , my Sram S60's make a metallic sound, as if they are hitting something. Would this be a sign thet the spokes are too loose? It only seems to come from the front wheel as well. Anybody else experience this with these kind of wheels?

  2. #2
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    If it is a pinging sound, then it is probably the spokes. Especially since this is on the front wheel. Could also be rubbing against the brake pad as you corner. So check how tight your skewer is.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by nightfend View Post
    If it is a pinging sound, then it is probably the spokes. Especially since this is on the front wheel. Could also be rubbing against the brake pad as you corner. So check how tight your skewer is.
    It is a scrapping sound. I tried to look and see if it is touching the brakes, but it seems to be a different sound to when I am hard on the brakes.

  4. #4
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    What tires? Check the dropouts for any contact, if it isn't the brakes or the wheel/tire hitting something, only thing left is bearings.

  5. #5
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    I am using Continental Grand Prix 4000 S tires ATM.

    What are dropouts? Still a noob , sorry.

    I should also mention that I am about 200lbs, sorry I didn't mention this earlier. Also it is only when I put pressure on the wheel when it is at an angle to the road, like sprinting from a traffic light to get up to speed.

  6. #6
    downhill quickly
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    First suggestion. Perhaps your brakes are not centered up properly...perhaps flexing the (f,r or both) wheels left or right upon braking...causing some spoke "singing" flex. Hold the bike upright and view each wheel movement as you apply associated break pressure. Clamping should be neutral without side bias wheel movement.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by DonDenver View Post
    First suggestion. Perhaps your brakes are not centered up properly...perhaps flexing the (f,r or both) wheels left or right upon braking...causing some spoke "singing" flex. Hold the bike upright and view each wheel movement as you apply associated break pressure. Clamping should be neutral without side bias wheel movement.
    First time I rode with them they did veer to the right, but I thought nothing of it. I will check the brakes again. Also when lightly applying brake pressure, it seems the brakes grab in a certain spot on the front wheel.

    Is "singing flex detrimental to the wheel?

    And I have searched the web to find out how to tighten these wheels spokes with no luck, how do you tighten the spokes on these. I bought them from the USA and I don't really have any pro shops around me that could service a set of Srams (No one sold them here , thats why I imported them myself)

  8. #8
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    JD

    I would not attempt to true your wheels youself unless you have good experience as the technique required takes some practice to avoid a compounded mess of other issues. The metallic "singing" noise (often heard from a rear wheel under a loaded pedal stroke or when cornering at high speed in an aggressive cant or when a brake pad strike is biased on either the left or right brake track causing the wheel to flex against it's efficient path) is not necessarily damaging or dangerous but rather damn annoying and energy draining both mechanically, physically and psychologically ;)

    NOTE...with all that said above, I would also say that none of this may have anything to do with your problem, but it would be the "setup" cues I'd first check out:

    Both f/r brake clamping to brake surface is flush, square with spot on even pressure (visual cue is the unweighted wheel does not move laterally. Sound cue is a solid thump of brake clamp on the wheel at rest. Feel cue is as though you hand at the break lever is attached to a well balanced, solid wheel).

    Both wheels properly set into dropouts with clamping pressure appropriate to wheel manufacture spec

    Spokes properly aligned and when "plucked" have equal tune

    Spoke nipples seated properly...no material wear with rim

    Brake tracks clean, brake pads have no material embedded, all brake components tightened to spec

    If rear wheel has any cross spoke pattern that presses against another spoke, slightly separate and add a touch of lube...release...then wipe off excess about the area

    Tighten carefully the cassette lock ring (requires specific tool to interface)

    I'd verify all the above checks out first before moving onward to a wheel true job whereas I would suggest going to a shop and learn (if you have not done before)

    Good luck

    Edit...just noticed your comment about no shops nearby...ouch...friends, video's and good research here at RBR and I'm sure you'll become pro at wheel tuning!

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