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  1. #1
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    SRAM XD-R (12 speed road standard) ?

    I've been running Shimano 11 speed for several years now and haven't paid much attention to anything related to SRAM.

    That is until recently when I bought a new SRAM 1x gravel bike and decided to buy a set of aftermarket wheels for it.

    The bike (Norco Search XR Force 1) came stock with a set of WTB Frequency wheels with a SRAM XD Driver and XG-1180 (10-42) rear cassette.

    The aftermarket wheels I bought were Boyd Jocassee's, and I ordered them with White Industries CLD Hubs with an "XD" driver and an additional Shimano 11 Speed driver in case I decide to convert the bike, or want to use the wheels on one of my other bikes.

    I bought a second SRAM XG-1180 cassette to install in the new wheels and when I mounted it on the bike, immediately noticed a slight wobble in the cassette. Not sure if this was a hub issue or something else, I emailed Boyd. He informed me that the White Ind CLD "XD" driver is actually an 'XD-R' (XD Road) driver, which is 1.8mm wider than the standard 11 speed XD driver, and that I needed to add a 1.8mm spacer between the cassette and the hub to properly tighten and align the cassette.

    I did this. Unfortunately, it didn't resolve my 'wobble' issue, which turned out to be a deformed inner ring on the cassette (which is being returned for warranty replacement). It did however improve the shifting/indexing (no surprise there).

    Anyway, apparently this new(?) XDR (XD Road - presumably to allow for 12 speed cassettes on road bikes ?) standard isn't totally new. I found some references to it online back in late 2016. What's strange is, despite having developed what is effectively a 12 speed road cassette driver, they have not developed a cassette for it. So far, only 3T has done that, presumably it is the basis for the 3T Strada road bike, which would likely benefit from having a 12 speed cassette, seeing as it does not support a front derailleur.

    Anyway, I just thought I'd share this. It might be common knowledge to those in the industry, but for me it was new info.

    While I appreciate not having to re-dish wheels to swap drivers (for multi-bike compatibility), I find it mildly annoying that I have to deal with the spacer issues that I thought we were done with after upgrading everything from 10 speed to 11 speed.

    More info.

    An article from Bike Rumor talking about XD-Road and the potential for 12 speeds.
    https://www.bikerumor.com/2017/09/05...road-possible/


  2. #2
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    The 3T cassette is still 11 speed. No one can make a 12 speed cassette until someone (Sram seems most likely) makes a 12 speed shifter. Actually what I would hope to see is a 13 speed road group with the large cog cantilevered over the spokes like with Eagle. Road cogs may not be big enough to do that though. At 13 speed the gaps compared to a compact double 11speed would be almost equal, probably losing only 1 unique ratio.

  3. #3
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  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by cobra_kai View Post
    The 3T cassette is still 11 speed. No one can make a 12 speed cassette until someone (Sram seems most likely) makes a 12 speed shifter. Actually what I would hope to see is a 13 speed road group with the large cog cantilevered over the spokes like with Eagle. Road cogs may not be big enough to do that though. At 13 speed the gaps compared to a compact double 11speed would be almost equal, probably losing only 1 unique ratio.

    At which point you'd all but certainly want a wider rear spacing that roadie 130mm or MTB 135 mm. Which can start causing issues with crank q-factor, depending on the frame material and the crank and if it has say a powermeter/cadence sensor on it. Since Shimano just released their 8000/9100 roadie groups...Big S won't refresh with another cog for at least another 2+ years. My groading bike has 142mm rear spacing and an XDR driver available for it so it is all set either way.


    If Boyd or November are around...anyone know if XDR is an open or licensed "standard"? That will determine right off if it is ignored by everyone other than SRAM.
    "Refreshingly Unconcerned With The Vulgar Exigencies Of Veracity "

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marc View Post
    At which point you'd all but certainly want a wider rear spacing that roadie 130mm or MTB 135 mm. Which can start causing issues with crank q-factor, depending on the frame material and the crank and if it has say a powermeter/cadence sensor on it. Since Shimano just released their 8000/9100 roadie groups...Big S won't refresh with another cog for at least another 2+ years. My groading bike has 142mm rear spacing and an XDR driver available for it so it is all set either way.


    If Boyd or November are around...anyone know if XDR is an open or licensed "standard"? That will determine right off if it is ignored by everyone other than SRAM.
    Well the 3t cassette uses it with the 9 tooth cog. I think some others are as well like ethirteen.

    Sent from my SM-G930F using Tapatalk

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marc View Post
    If Boyd or November are around...anyone know if XDR is an open or licensed "standard"? That will determine right off if it is ignored by everyone other than SRAM.
    I'm not those guys, but the answer is that other manufacturers have made XD-R cassettes (SRAM has not - you need a 1.8mm spacer to run a SRAM XG-1080 10-42).

    3T has two versions of XD-R cassettes. Both 9-32, but with different spacing between cogs.

    They are called Overdrive and Bailout.

    Some info here
    https://www.bikerumor.com/2017/08/31...roach-1x-road/

  7. #7
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    XDR is Not for 12 Speed Road

    You have the XDR thing wrong. And Bike Rumor are morons.

    The point is to have cogs less than 11 teeth, not for 12 speed.

    Like with the 3T cassettes they have a 9 tooth.

    Shimano already has a patented 13 speed system on a standard freehub body, all it requires is hanging cogs over the spokes. You can easily put 12 speeds on a standard freehub body.

    Shimano's 11-34 Ultegra cassettes run 11 speeds on 10 speed spacing.
    use a torque wrench

  8. #8
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    XDR is for 12 Speed Road

    XDR is for both 12 speed and to have cogs less than 11 teeth. SRAM's 12 speed road product is still in press 'embargo' but should drop in April.
    Last edited by Talabardio; 1 Week Ago at 11:33 AM. Reason: add title

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