Results 1 to 4 of 4
  1. #1
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: blackcat_wheels's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Posts
    18

    Straight pull hubs, spokes interlacing - yes or no?

    Hi Guys,
    I just wanted to hear your opinion regarding interlacing spokes (physically crossing) using straight pull hubs.
    I see that some people do cross spokes and some do not. Obviously were talking about 2x or 3x lacing.

    Whats your take on this? Any experience?

    Im asking as recently I was building a wheel based on powertap GS hub and I did the interlacing as per manufacturer recommendation.
    I must say that I had serious troubles to true the wheel and keep the equal spoke tension at the same time. Looking closer to the hub and the way the spokes were running I noticed that by interlacing them the spokes were significantly curved at the cross section which caused that they were not running in straight line from hub to the rim. The hub spoke wholes are widely spaced so Im scratching my head if the interlacing was really required.

    Thanks for putting your 2-cents on this one
    Tomasz
    Custom wheels handcrafted in Switzerland
    ----------------------------------------------------
    https://blackcatwheels.ch/

  2. #2
    'brifter' is a lame word.
    Reputation: cxwrench's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    13,031
    They definitely don't have to touch. On most of the wheels like this that I see they don't, and I've built a few and laced them so they didn't. I'm sure someone will post a good reason one way or the other but my experience has been that they're ok not overlapping physically.
    I work for some bike racers
    I've got some bikes, some guns,
    and a bunch of skateboards

  3. #3
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    707
    The only thing that interlacing them does is normalize the bracing angle between heads in and heads out (or leading and trailing on a straight pull hub) spokes. I've test built several j-bend spoked wheels without interlacing and it works 100% fine.

    If you are going to torture the spokes to get them to where they can interlace, then don't. But also, if you are lacing a straight pull hub where there is that much of an angle to get them to interlace, then you are dealing with a hub that has a flange design that isn't that great. I don't love straight pull hubs because this is often the case.

  4. #4
    A wheelist
    Reputation: Mike T.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    11,286
    Quote Originally Posted by November Dave View Post
    I've test built several j-bend spoked wheels without interlacing and it works 100% fine.
    I've been tempted to do a non-interlaced j-bend set of wheels for myself for years. I've never read, with an acceptable explanation, of why we interlace spokes. "Because we've done it like that for a hundred years" doesn't count.
    .
    Mike T's home wheelbuilding site - dedicated to providing Newby wheelbuilders with motivation, information and resources.

Similar Threads

  1. Straight Pull Spokes
    By duriel in forum Wheels and Tires
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 05-02-2016, 04:10 PM
  2. j-pull vs linear pull spokes
    By deviousalex in forum Wheels and Tires
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: 01-05-2012, 10:17 AM
  3. Eurus, Neutron hubs use normal straight-pull spokes?
    By mellowman in forum Campagnolo
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 07-15-2005, 09:34 PM
  4. Replacing spokes on Campy wheels with straight pull???
    By mellowman in forum Wheels and Tires
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 07-14-2005, 05:02 PM
  5. Spokes, straight pull or 90 degree bend and hub flange.
    By Von Zip in forum Components, Wrenching
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 04-25-2004, 04:28 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT ROADBIKEREVIEW

VISIT US AT

roadbikereview.com and the ConsumerReview Network are business units of Invenda Corporation

(C) Copyright 1996-2018. All Rights Reserved.