Results 1 to 11 of 11
  1. #1
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Posts
    35

    Swapping out Disc wheels - pretty straightforward or pay LBS?

    I have some new wheels coming soon and I will need to move the cassette over and make sure the disc brakes are aligned properly..etc. Is it better to just bring everything to the LBS to do it properly?

    I have a bike stand and do basic services on my bike. Most complex was probably tuning the derailleur, which I actually did quite well, but I don't know the complexity of the wheel swap.

    Thoughts? And what tools do I need if I do it myself?

  2. #2
    A wheelist
    Reputation: Mike T.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    11,305
    Go to the Park Tool site. I'm sure they will have everything you need to know.
    .
    Mike T's home wheelbuilding site - dedicated to providing Newby wheelbuilders with motivation, information and resources.

  3. #3
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: upstateSC-rider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    1,587
    It is actually pretty straight forward, you need the tools to remove/re-install the cassette and rotor, whether 6-bolt or centerlock. Chances are good you're going to have to tweak your derailleur limits and re-center your caliper a little also but it's all fairly basic.
    Enjoy your new wheels.
    In reference to the Assault on Mt Mitchell...
    Quote Originally Posted by merckx56
    The easier solution is to find a biker bar in Spartanburg the night before, go in and pick a fight. The ass-whipping you'll get will be far less painful than the one Mitchell will give you the next day!

  4. #4
    Old and in the way.
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    175
    Are you going to keep both sets of wheels? If yes, buy new disc rotors and cassette. If not, you'll need removal tools specific to the rotors; 6 bolt or center lock. If center lock it's likely the same tool can be used for both the rotors and cassette. Brakes should line up perfectly, derailleur might need a little tweaking.

  5. #5
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    709
    You should learn to do this, and have the tools required. If you are going to get a new cassette and rotors, you'll just need to install those and not remove the old ones which means one or two fewer tools.

    If your rotors are 6 bolt rotors, then you'll need either a torx tool or hex of appropriate size for the rotor bolts. Simple, you probably have these on a multi-tool already.

    You'll need a cassette lock ring tool. I prefer the dedicated ones like Park Tool FR-5H but the Park FR-5.2 plus your adjustable wrench words fine too.

    The lock ring tool will also work on many center lock rotor lock rings, but not all of them.

    If you are swapping your cassette from the old wheels to the new, you will also need a chain whip. Some lock rings require use of an external bottom bracket cup tool.

    I regard all of these tools as must-haves for anyone who wants to be able to work on his/her bike without being reliant on a bike shop for basic stuff.

    This video will explain most of what you need to know about rotors, lock rings, installing them, switching them, etc.

    Mike T's advice on checking out the Park Tool site is spot on. It's a good site. You may need to adjust brake calipers and/or derailleur very slightly. Park's site explains both.

  6. #6
    30 mpdb
    Reputation: beeristasty's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 1970
    Posts
    1,001
    If you're doing the install and not your LBS, get the tools no matter what. If you're going to install a new cassette and rotor onto the new wheelset, you're going to need the tools to do so. If you're going to be swapping those parts, you're going to need the tools to do so.

    If the centerlock hubs require a 15/20mm lockring, then you'll likely need a 44mm notched bottom bracket tool in addition to the cassette lockring tool and chanwhip.
    Last edited by beeristasty; 01-14-2018 at 09:31 AM.

  7. #7
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Posts
    35
    Quote Originally Posted by dmanthree View Post
    Are you going to keep both sets of wheels? If yes, buy new disc rotors and cassette. If not, you'll need removal tools specific to the rotors; 6 bolt or center lock. If center lock it's likely the same tool can be used for both the rotors and cassette. Brakes should line up perfectly, derailleur might need a little tweaking.
    Ok, you just made a lot of sense here on something obvious that I did not even think of.

    Yes, I figure I should keep both wheels. It is always good to have a backup I can swap in. Plus, for some reason my Giant frame is not totally all ultegra. I think my cassette is actually 105, so this would be a cool little upgrade anyway. I can also get their Ice rotors.

    So my checklist should be :

    Rotors (I have 6 bolt) - got some Shimanos

    Cassette - I have a Shimano 105 11x28 11 speed right now. I got the Ultegra R8000

    Tool - Park FR-5.2 plus my adjustable wrench.

    Bike tool - for rotors

    Grease

    Does that cover it?
    Last edited by HammerIt; 01-14-2018 at 03:21 PM.

  8. #8
    30 mpdb
    Reputation: beeristasty's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 1970
    Posts
    1,001
    I'd recommend going with centerlock hubs no matter what, as it's a much better interface imo. Quicker install/removal (not that you'd be doing it a lot), can accomodate 6 bolt rotors with an adapter, and a more robust interface (not that there is anything wrong with 6 bolt).

  9. #9
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Posts
    35
    Quote Originally Posted by beeristasty View Post
    I'd recommend going with centerlock hubs no matter what, as it's a much better interface imo. Quicker install/removal (not that you'd be doing it a lot), can accomodate 6 bolt rotors with an adapter, and a more robust interface (not that there is anything wrong with 6 bolt).
    The hubs I have coming are 6 bolt. Put the order in a few weeks back and the wheels are just shipping over now.

  10. #10
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Posts
    35
    Update - did it all myself. So far so good. I would say the trickiest part was remembering to pull the 8s/9s/10s spacer out of my cassette. Outside of that, this operation was a success.

  11. #11
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Posts
    154
    Quote Originally Posted by HammerIt View Post
    Update - did it all myself. So far so good. I would say the trickiest part was remembering to pull the 8s/9s/10s spacer out of my cassette. Outside of that, this operation was a success.

    Good!
    A good step to be independent!

Similar Threads

  1. newbie swapping out Felt F85 frame help me out..
    By Tajue17 in forum Bikes, Frames and Forks
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 12-07-2017, 11:54 AM
  2. disc - swapping wheels,trainer use and hydro upgrade
    By Donn12 in forum General Cycling Discussion
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 11-03-2012, 06:06 PM
  3. Another Saddle Geometry Question (simple but not straightforward)
    By box handler in forum Components, Wrenching
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 05-03-2012, 11:35 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT ROADBIKEREVIEW

VISIT US AT

roadbikereview.com and the ConsumerReview Network are business units of Invenda Corporation

(C) Copyright 1996-2018. All Rights Reserved.