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Thread: Tire width

  1. #1
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    Tire width

    My roubaix will fit up to 32s and I'm considering riding bigger tires than my current 28s (continental 4000s) so I can drop the psi some. Anyone know of a good chart comparison for these wider tires vs brand, etc. (listing rolling resistance, etc). Everything I find is 23/25/28 comparison, not 28+

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    Not sure I understand exactly what info you are seeking...probably just having a senility moment.

    The same model of tire properly inflated means wider tire has less rolling resistance. (You will be faster on the 32 than 28, etc.) As for whether one brand of the same style of tire is a faster tire the difference is measurable with instruments but not so much to effect rolling speed.

    Hope the above helps.

  3. #3
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    Here's the ubiquitous frank berto chart.
    Tire width-bertopresschart.jpg

    If i'm riding my road bike a bunch (i'm a **** roadie) i end up tweaking the pressures up/down about 5 psi. Your weight distribution affects handling, so it's not gospel.

    If you need more then google it and ask a more specific question. Too open ended otherwise.

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    Quote Originally Posted by GlobalGuy View Post
    Not sure I understand exactly what info you are seeking...probably just having a senility moment.

    The same model of tire properly inflated means wider tire has less rolling resistance. (You will be faster on the 32 than 28, etc.) As for whether one brand of the same style of tire is a faster tire the difference is measurable with instruments but not so much to effect rolling speed.

    Hope the above helps.
    I have heard this several times, but every time I try to verify it I can't find the information.

    Specifically, if you use the chart Bubble posted to select tire pressure for a given weight, the decreased pressure of larger tires increases their rolling resistance until they exceed that of the smaller tire.
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    Quote Originally Posted by bubble View Post
    Here's the ubiquitous frank berto chart.
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	bertopresschart.jpg 
Views:	133 
Size:	101.3 KB 
ID:	321845

    If i'm riding my road bike a bunch (i'm a **** roadie) i end up tweaking the pressures up/down about 5 psi. Your weight distribution affects handling, so it's not gospel.

    If you need more then google it and ask a more specific question. Too open ended otherwise.
    https://i2.wp.com/intheknowcycling.c...able.png?ssl=1

    im looking for something like this but for wider tires. I'd like to see how the different tires compare between brands, etc.

  6. #6
    changingleaf
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    This has lots of rolling resistance information.

    https://www.bicyclerollingresistance...d-bike-reviews

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kontact View Post
    Specifically, if you use the chart Bubble posted to select tire pressure for a given weight, the decreased pressure of larger tires increases their rolling resistance until they exceed that of the smaller tire.
    I have not found this to be true. It's pretty much a wash.

    The misconception about wider tires having less rolling resistance is that most people forget the last part of that sentence "at the same pressure". Since the correct pressure will be less in a wider tire, that makes it, as I said, a wash.
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kontact View Post
    Specifically, if you use the chart Bubble posted to select tire pressure for a given weight, the decreased pressure of larger tires increases their rolling resistance until they exceed that of the smaller tire.
    It's all useless information either way because it assumes everyone rides on whatever surface the test were conducted with and that ride weight is the same. And then there's aerodynamics and ability to handle the bike.

    A rock hard 23 will never be as fast as, say, 32 reasonably low PSI over cobbles. And of course the opposite would be true on a nice track. Between those extreme picking a tires is art not science IMO. There are too many variables in conditions of most real world riding conditions to use science for blanket statements.

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    Maybe not exactly what you're looking for but this blog post would probably be worth your time to read. It's worth reading all the responses to the blog as it is a good discussion.

    The blog is biased as Jan Heine is the Compass it is still worth a read.

    https://janheine.wordpress.com/2018/...-in-the-world/
    Too old to ride plastic

  10. #10
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    Don't overthink the miniscule differences in rolling resistance. If you want better ride and more traction (generally, w/ obvious limits) and more rim protection use the bigger tires. You'll go nuts trying to figure out rolling resistance differences given all the variables and as I said...the differences are tiny. Not worth thinking about.
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    Quote Originally Posted by cxwrench View Post
    Don't overthink the miniscule differences in rolling resistance. If you want better ride and more traction (generally, w/ obvious limits) and more rim protection use the bigger tires. You'll go nuts trying to figure out rolling resistance differences given all the variables and as I said...the differences are tiny. Not worth thinking about.
    ^This exactly!!!^

    As I have always said, if I can't tell the difference in speed/effort required, why shouldn't I go with the wider tire that has a nicer ride - plain and simple? No sense obsessing myself with geeky formulas and engineering charts. My hands and butt don't lie.
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    ^This exactly!!!^

    As I have always said, if I can't tell the difference in speed/effort required, why shouldn't I go with the wider tire that has a nicer ride - plain and simple? No sense obsessing myself with geeky formulas and engineering charts. My hands and butt don't lie.
    A more comfortable ride leads to less fatigue which leads to a fresher cyclist which leads to faster overall rides.

    A large volume, low pressure tire gives a more comfortable ride, better traction, better flat protection and less rolling resistance. That's a lot of wins for one component to give.
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    I just deleted a whole post. I did so after deciding the way things get scrambled in these forums it was not advantageous to post what I originally did.

    Instead, I will simply reiterate without explanation FWIW:

    Wider tires of the same road bike model of tire roll faster than their narrower brothers.

    Personally, I found that my times improved the most on climbs when upsizing.

    I also find higher TPI better...more comfortable and probably faster.

    That's my two-cents worth.
    Last edited by GlobalGuy; 02-12-2018 at 11:25 PM. Reason: Change of information

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    ^This exactly!!!^

    As I have always said, if I can't tell the difference in speed/effort required, why shouldn't I go with the wider tire that has a nicer ride - plain and simple? No sense obsessing myself with geeky formulas and engineering charts. My hands and butt don't lie.

    Makes sense. What brands are recommended for wider tires?

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    Quote Originally Posted by GlobalGuy View Post
    Wider tires of the same road bike model of tire roll faster than their faster than their narrower brothers.
    With the proviso that both are run at the same pressure.

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    Quote Originally Posted by gasman777 View Post
    Makes sense. What brands are recommended for wider tires?
    Everybody makes good tires. Conti, Michelin, Bontrager, Specialized. It's not just 'who makes wide tires' it's the type of tire you're looking at. Race, Training, All Weather...

    Just be careful, some of them are wider than the numbers, and width obviously depends on the rim you're mounting them on. Sounds like you're just shy of obsessing badly. Roll it back a touch.
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    Quote Originally Posted by cxwrench View Post
    Everybody makes good tires. Conti, Michelin, Bontrager, Specialized. It's not just 'who makes wide tires' it's the type of tire you're looking at. Race, Training, All Weather...

    Just be careful, some of them are wider than the numbers, and width obviously depends on the rim you're mounting them on. Sounds like you're just shy of obsessing badly. Roll it back a touch.
    Maybe so. But I'll also add that if I would've done more research the first set of tires I bought I would've saved myself some cash. I bought gator skins at first and thought they were awful. Did some research, found continentals and made the change. Theyre way better for comfort in my opinion. They run fairly wide on my wheel, maybe I'll just get another set of those even though I can only find 28s which I know will end up being closer to 30. But point taken, wouldn't be the first time I over thought something.

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    Quote Originally Posted by gasman777 View Post
    Maybe so. But I'll also add that if I would've done more research the first set of tires I bought I would've saved myself some cash. I bought gator skins at first and thought they were awful. Did some research, found continentals and made the change. Theyre way better for comfort in my opinion. They run fairly wide on my wheel, maybe I'll just get another set of those even though I can only find 28s which I know will end up being closer to 30. But point taken, wouldn't be the first time I over thought something.
    Switched to continental 4000s to be more specific. I liked those much better than the gator skins so maybe I'll just buy them again.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by gasman777 View Post
    Switched to continental 4000s to be more specific. I liked those much better than the gator skins so maybe I'll just buy them again.
    4000S is a great tire, definitely a much nicer ride than the Gator...the casing is much more supple. Hard to go wrong w/ those, durable/grippy/super consistent. Maybe try Vittoria Corsa, not as durable but a great tire.
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    Quote Originally Posted by cxwrench View Post
    Everybody makes good tires. Conti, Michelin, Bontrager, Specialized. It's not just 'who makes wide tires' it's the type of tire you're looking at. Race, Training, All Weather...
    I'll add Challenge. They make some really sweet wider tires. The problem with them as compared to bigger brands is it's difficult to pay less than retail. Whereas with Conti, Vittoria, ect. good sales are the rule not the exception.

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