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  1. #1
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    Tubeless Questions

    Riding a 2017 Specialized Roubaix with DT Swiss R470 dbs. Currently riding continental 4000iis (28s). Would I gain any comfort switching to tubeless and a little wider? If so, which tire brand and width is recommended?

    I don't want to lose speed but I'm no racer by any means. I ride for fun and exercise but I'm slow enough as it is and don't want to get worse. I assume acceleration will be a little slower.

  2. #2
    'brifter' is a lame word.
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    Quote Originally Posted by gasman777 View Post
    Riding a 2017 Specialized Roubaix with DT Swiss R470 dbs. Currently riding continental 4000iis (28s). Would I gain any comfort switching to tubeless and a little wider? If so, which tire brand and width is recommended?

    I don't want to lose speed but I'm no racer by any means. I ride for fun and exercise but I'm slow enough as it is and don't want to get worse. I assume acceleration will be a little slower.
    The only way you'd 'gain' comfort would be to run lower pressure w/ the tubless tires, and it would have to be an appreciable amount as they tend to have stiffer construction. My feeling is that on the road you shouldn't be inflating your normal tubed clinchers to a significantly higher pressure than your tubeless tires. You shouldn't inflate your tubed tires so you don't pinch flat, you should inflate them so they ride nicely and have good traction...then keep your eyes open and don't run over crap that will cause pinch flats. If you happen to pinch a tube once or twice a year, big deal. That, in my mind, is totally acceptable...I'd much rather have my tires inflated properly rather than too hard to avoid something that might happen once/twice a year.
    Now...about tubeless in general. It's magic on mtb's. I would ALWAYS use tubless on the mountain. I used it on road for 4-5 years then had a badly cut tire. What a completely messy pain in the ass. As soon as I got home that day I put tubes back in and haven't looked back. And that's coming from a pro mechanic w/ over 20 years in the business and 15 years of working for pro teams. If it's a messy PITA for me, think about how bad it could be for you.
    For road my advice is to ignore tubeless and save yourself the inevitable hassle. Yes, tubeless 'might' greatly reduce punctures, but at some point you will flat. And it will be messy and most likely a lot harder to fix than a normal tubed puncture.
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  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by cxwrench View Post
    The only way you'd 'gain' comfort would be to run lower pressure w/ the tubless tires, and it would have to be an appreciable amount as they tend to have stiffer construction. My feeling is that on the road you shouldn't be inflating your normal tubed clinchers to a significantly higher pressure than your tubeless tires. You shouldn't inflate your tubed tires so you don't pinch flat, you should inflate them so they ride nicely and have good traction...then keep your eyes open and don't run over crap that will cause pinch flats. If you happen to pinch a tube once or twice a year, big deal. That, in my mind, is totally acceptable...I'd much rather have my tires inflated properly rather than too hard to avoid something that might happen once/twice a year.
    Now...about tubeless in general. It's magic on mtb's. I would ALWAYS use tubless on the mountain. I used it on road for 4-5 years then had a badly cut tire. What a completely messy pain in the ass. As soon as I got home that day I put tubes back in and haven't looked back. And that's coming from a pro mechanic w/ over 20 years in the business and 15 years of working for pro teams. If it's a messy PITA for me, think about how bad it could be for you.
    For road my advice is to ignore tubeless and save yourself the inevitable hassle. Yes, tubeless 'might' greatly reduce punctures, but at some point you will flat. And it will be messy and most likely a lot harder to fix than a normal tubed puncture.
    Sounds like a pain, I think I'll pass. Thanks for the insight.

  4. #4
    changingleaf
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    No necessarily. Lower pressure does provide a more comfortable ride and you can lower the pressure on your tube-type tires. One of the benefit of running tubeless is that you you can run lower pressure with very little risk of pinch flatting.

    Lower pressure does not make a huge difference in rolling resistance until you drop the pressure by 25% or more. If you're not racing and looking for the absolute lowest rolling resistance then I believe it is a secondary concern to pinch flatting.

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