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  1. #1
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    Tubular tire guys best spare setup, seat bags or straps

    Looking for a good setup for my spare tubular lately I've just been carrying it in one of my jersey pockets I was thinking of either strapping it under my seat or buying the arundel tubi bag. Anyone who has the bag give any feedback likes or dislikes. Or any cool ideas to fold it flatter or strap it flatter so it's not as bulky in my jerse. I currently use a shoelace to straps it then keep it in jersey pocket.

  2. #2
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    I really like those older cinelli bags looks like a little velvet open ended bag to strap your tubular under the seat.

  3. #3
    Hanging 10 bra
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    I have seen teammates fold it up and place under the seat with velcro straps holding it in place. There are a few seat bags that accomadate them quite nicely and clean.

    http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B002WC8ZLK

  4. #4
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    I have one of the Detours Wedgie bags. I can fit a tubie, tire levers, multi-tool and a couple of Co2's in there.
    I don't know where I got it. I think I won it at cross or MTB race a few years ago. Found it in a cabinet this year....it fits well and is stable on the bike and doesn't rub my legs ( which I thought it would and why it sat on the shelf for a while...YMMV)
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Tubular tire guys best spare setup, seat bags or straps-imag0430.jpg  
    Last edited by the mayor; 11-27-2012 at 04:53 AM.

  5. #5
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    That sounds like a really good way. I love tubulars everybody dogs them that's never tried them. I use tufo tape which makes installation about as fast as installing a clincher just gotta do some hard breaking out the gate to heat them up. That sets the glue and smooths out any unevenness. It seemed with clinchers every flat I got was a tear or cut in the tire making it unusable. It left me thinking might as well have tubulars at least I'd have a good spare tire to change too. And for all those out there who have never changed a tubular with tufo tape it's simple. Deflate or if flat already start ripping of tire opposite valve. My tires usually come completely off with the tape stuck to the tire. The tape is basically very thin two sided tape kinda like golf grip tape. It will leave some sticky residue on rim. Pull out your spare which usually is an old used one so should have some sticky stuff left on it. Start at the valve stretching it away from valve on both sides till its all the way on. I can do this in about a minute flat. I would take corners a little smoother ( no 40mph rips around turns) especially in the beginning till you get it hot and the glue has a chance to stick good.

  6. #6
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    Fausto says

    "-Like this."
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Tubular tire guys best spare setup, seat bags or straps-coppi.jpg  
    They do anything just to win a salami in ridiculous races. I take my gear out of the car and put my bike together. Tourists and locals are watching from sidewalk cafes. Non-racers. The emptiness of those lives shocks me. It was the illest of times, it was the dopest of times. And we looked damn good. Actually the autobus broke down somewhere on the Mortirolo.

  7. #7
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    I like my Tubi -- clean lines, very secure. (Looks bigger in this photo than in real life due to the camera angle and wide angle lens setting.) I have a couple allen wrenches and a valve core removal tool (to put sealant in a punctured tire before swapping out for my spare) in the side pocket, and a Ritchey TorqueKey tucked in the the spare. You'll note the frame pump old-school style along the left seatstay. It's very secure there.

    Getting the spare in is a tight fit, and I have to take the bag off and open up the main zip to get enough slack to open up the side pocket. Taking the spare out is pretty easy.

    I'm also looking at this Jandd for longer self-supported solo rides where I might be so over-prepared as to carry a second spare as well as the Stan's

  8. #8
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    There are a few seat bags that are big enough to handle a spare tire plus other repair tools. Topeak has one called the Aero Wedge in a size large, their expandable; Jandd makes one called the Tubular Tire Saddle Bag II, this will hold two tubulars plus small tools, or simply carry one tub and use the rest of the space for other stuff. I think it's a bit neater to have the spare inside a bag with the rest of tools in my opinion.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xk98yvozq1g
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nvk63...eature=related
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature...&v=p92Stnnigjs
    "They don't do things that way anymore. This is the Age of Science Know-How, electronal marvels."

  9. #9
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    Call me what you want but I don't like extra items on my bike like bags, fenders, lights, .... so I do not carry a spare tubular or tube (for clinchers) but just a small bottle of sealant, RVC tool, and CO2 set. All this plus mini tool-set fits in my jersey or in the into my bottle cage container. If the tubular or tube cannot be sealed I have the cell phone. Riding on latex I've had only one flat in last 12,000 miles and it was not even a puncture - the latex 'seam' separated near the valve (and it was sealed).
    Tiremaniacs
    Continental - Schwalbe - Veloflex
    Racing and Training Cycling Tires

  10. #10
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    Yeah I've had 3 flats in 2012 two punctures that ripped tire wide open and 3rd was a little wire stuck in tire. I was smart enough to inspect tire and pull out tiny wire but c02 didn't work right and I only got 50 lbs or so in new tube and pinch flatted down the street all 3 had me calling my wife. All where using clinchers and on all I could have finished ride if I had tubulars with a spare.
    The arundel bag looks good I don't wanna have a huge bag on my seat that ones not bad.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bantamben View Post
    Yeah I've had 3 flats in 2012 two punctures that ripped tire wide open and 3rd was a little wire stuck in tire. I was smart enough to inspect tire and pull out tiny wire but c02 didn't work right and I only got 50 lbs or so in new tube and pinch flatted down the street all 3 had me calling my wife. All where using clinchers and on all I could have finished ride if I had tubulars with a spare.
    The arundel bag looks good I don't wanna have a huge bag on my seat that ones not bad.
    This is exactly why one of the reasons I don't carry CO2, you have a limited air supply. The other reasons are having to keep buying CO2's and making sure you replace the empty carts before your next ride; empty carts to deal with, unless your like most and just toss them on the side of the road when done! I find empty carts all over the paths and roads from California to Indiana and other places...not cool guys! Then when you get home you still have to put air in the tube because CO2 bleeds out through the pores of the tube way faster then regular air. So what's the point of CO2? faster? if your not racing there's no need for speed. Besides with a pump you can help stranded cyclists who ran out of CO2!!

    I use to carry two tubulars when I used them back in the day; and I also carried a tubular patch kit in case I used both spares, which happened more then once, and would spend roughly 45 minutes patching a tubular...what a pain that was on the side of the road. But that habit caused me to carry a spare ultralight racing tire tightly folded in my seat bag (along with a spare tube). I had to use that spare a couple of times. Once I gave a spare tire to a guy stranded on a lonely mountain road from a tire that split and a daunting 6 hour walk and darkness coming in about 2 hours; he had a spare tube but never thought about a tire problem, after that he started carrying a spare tire. I know that because the guy sent me a thank you card telling me that...along with two brand new tires and tubes! He asked for my address so he could return the tire but I never thought he could remember my address not alone actually send me my tire back...which he kept and sent me new tires instead.

    Carrying a spare may seem like too much but it's saved me and that other guy long walks in cycling shoes. I am also a firm believer in not calling my wife for any help, I don't treat her like she's my mommy, so I'll fix whatever happens on the bike or in the car. If all else fails I'll walk and still not call her. I've only had to call her twice in 30 plus years of marriage for emergency problems, both times I was in the hospital and thought she should know where I was. I know she'll come if I call her, but I'm just the kind of guy who won't do that to a woman. Weird aren't I?
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xk98yvozq1g
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nvk63...eature=related
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature...&v=p92Stnnigjs
    "They don't do things that way anymore. This is the Age of Science Know-How, electronal marvels."

  12. #12
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    I train on tubulars and carry a spare in Garneau's 'little race bag,' can fit a co2 and a tire lever (to take off old tubular) in it. I carry a can of pit stop in my jersey and have a small pump (Barbieri carbon one on frame). I take along a cell phone just in case but have never had to call for a ride.

  13. #13
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    Sounds like a good combo

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bantamben View Post
    Looking for a good setup for my spare tubular lately I've just been carrying it in one of my jersey pockets I was thinking of either strapping it under my seat or buying the arundel tubi bag. Anyone who has the bag give any feedback likes or dislikes. Or any cool ideas to fold it flatter or strap it flatter so it's not as bulky in my jerse. I currently use a shoelace to straps it then keep it in jersey pocket.
    I only use clinchers now, but back in the day when I used tubulars I used one that rolled up so small that it was the size of a tube. I did a good write up with pics for size comparison. If you are interested just google "best spare tubular" if it doesn't come up then add Thomas Gerlach to the search as well.


    Hope this helps,

    Cheers,

    -TG

  15. #15
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    Arundel tubi bag is suitable for below seat or in jersey pocket. It holds 1 tubular tyre + CO2 firmly in the main compartment as well as 2 side pockets for cards, a tyre lever, etc. I don't leave home without it.

    @ThomasGerlachProTri - thanks for the tip about the rolled up tufo track tyre. Will give it a try.
    Last edited by thprice; 11-28-2012 at 12:08 AM.

  16. #16
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    Thanks for all the help sounds like the arundel or janddt bag and a spare tufo 120 are the ticket maybe a spare user tire in the seat bag and for trying to get a fast strava time no seatbag with the tufo 120 in the jersey.

  17. #17
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    I can't believe no one mention wrapping an old race number around the rolled up tubular to perserve it from road grit. No need for a bag.

  18. #18
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    no disrespect but fast strava time -- meh.... Whatever floats your boat

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