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  1. #1
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    Wheel Alignment issue - off center

    Just got new wheels and tested them out. I noticed that the new wheelset is riding awfully close to the chain stay (as seen in the pictures). However, the cassette is right up against the other side of the chain stay so moving it laterally is not possible. Any ideas or is this normal?

    First picture (with my old wheel set . . . everything is normal)


    Second picture (wheel is off center)


    Third picture (the hub)
    Road: Pinarello Paris
    MTB: Mongoose Ontero

  2. #2
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    It looks like the wheel is out of dish. If that is the case, the drive side spokes need to be tightened to pull the rim over to the right.
    Valley Cyclist Wheels www.valleycyclist.com

  3. #3
    A wheelist
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    The new wheel is not dished correctly. I'll expand a bit on what Valley said. All rims should be aligned with the center line of the frame. Here is a copy & paste from my wheelbuilding site (link below) -

    "DISH definition - "centering of the rim between the hub locknuts". What you're actually doing is centering the rim on the center line of the bike - a worthy goal eh?

    Wheels must run along the same line as the centerline of the bike's frame. The middle of the axle (or really half way between the axle locknuts) is the center line of the frame. But hub flanges aren't equidistant from the locknuts due to the space need by the cassette and disc brake rotors. Take a close look at a hub and you will see what I mean. Your rim will not necessarily be centered between the hub's flanges - this will happen only on non-disc front wheels and some single speed rear wheels.
    To achieve Dish, some spokes (gear or disc side) will be more upright than the non drive side or disc side spokes. Those more upright spokes will have more tension due to their lower pulling angle. There is nothing wrong with this. It's normal on all wheels except non disc brake front wheels.
    Measure with the inside calipers from rim wall to stay or blade or flip-flop the wheel in the stand and take two measurements from one side. Slacken all the spokes on one side of the wheel 1/4 turn and tighten an equal 1/4 turn on all spokes on the other side. This will move the rim over. Repeat until centering is really close. Use 1/8 turns if necessary.
    Dish is a scary thing to many newby wheelbuilders. Why, I have no idea. All rims on all wheels have to be centered between the hub locknuts and that's all you're doing when you 'dish' a wheel".


    You can re-dish using your eye as a gauge. "Close" is good enough and in your first pic you can tell that the dish is right.

    If you attempt this yourself you will need just a spoke wrench. You will need to relieve stresses and spoke wind-up but all the info for that is on my site. Maybe this weekend I'll insert a new paragraph on my site specifically about re-dishing wheels.
    .
    Mike The Bike's home wheelbuilding info - dedicated to providing Newby wheelbuilder information and motivation.

    I'm not cranky; I just have a violent reaction to stupid people.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike T. View Post
    The new wheel is not dished correctly. I'll expand a bit on what Valley said. All rims should be aligned with the center line of the frame. Here is a copy & paste from my wheelbuilding site (link below) -

    "DISH definition - "centering of the rim between the hub locknuts". What you're actually doing is centering the rim on the center line of the bike - a worthy goal eh?

    Wheels must run along the same line as the centerline of the bike's frame. The middle of the axle (or really half way between the axle locknuts) is the center line of the frame. But hub flanges aren't equidistant from the locknuts due to the space need by the cassette and disc brake rotors. Take a close look at a hub and you will see what I mean. Your rim will not necessarily be centered between the hub's flanges - this will happen only on non-disc front wheels and some single speed rear wheels.
    To achieve Dish, some spokes (gear or disc side) will be more upright than the non drive side or disc side spokes. Those more upright spokes will have more tension due to their lower pulling angle. There is nothing wrong with this. It's normal on all wheels except non disc brake front wheels.
    Measure with the inside calipers from rim wall to stay or blade or flip-flop the wheel in the stand and take two measurements from one side. Slacken all the spokes on one side of the wheel 1/4 turn and tighten an equal 1/4 turn on all spokes on the other side. This will move the rim over. Repeat until centering is really close. Use 1/8 turns if necessary.
    Dish is a scary thing to many newby wheelbuilders. Why, I have no idea. All rims on all wheels have to be centered between the hub locknuts and that's all you're doing when you 'dish' a wheel".


    You can re-dish using your eye as a gauge. "Close" is good enough and in your first pic you can tell that the dish is right.

    If you attempt this yourself you will need just a spoke wrench. You will need to relieve stresses and spoke wind-up but all the info for that is on my site. Maybe this weekend I'll insert a new paragraph on my site specifically about re-dishing wheels.
    Thanks for this! Do you think its safe to ride temporarily if its not rubbing against my frame?
    Road: Pinarello Paris
    MTB: Mongoose Ontero

  5. #5
    A wheelist
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    Quote Originally Posted by martinrm View Post
    Do you think its safe to ride temporarily if its not rubbing against my frame?
    Absolutely! Just don't pull any gut-busting out-of-saddle sprints up 30% grades that's all.
    .
    Mike The Bike's home wheelbuilding info - dedicated to providing Newby wheelbuilder information and motivation.

    I'm not cranky; I just have a violent reaction to stupid people.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike T. View Post
    Absolutely! Just don't pull any gut-busting out-of-saddle sprints up 30% grades that's all.
    Well i do get to go up a 18% grade tomorrow hah. Repped btw, not that it means much.
    Road: Pinarello Paris
    MTB: Mongoose Ontero

  7. #7
    A wheelist
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    Quote Originally Posted by martinrm View Post
    Well i do get to go up a 18% grade tomorrow hah.
    Pffft, no problem.

    Repped btw, not that it means much.
    Thanks. I don't know what it means either. It sounds a bit face-bookie to me. It's not as though RBR pays us a bonus at xmas or anything.
    .
    Mike The Bike's home wheelbuilding info - dedicated to providing Newby wheelbuilder information and motivation.

    I'm not cranky; I just have a violent reaction to stupid people.

  8. #8
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    I wouldn't ride it. A little wheel deflection while riding will have it rubbing. If it isn't dished correctly to start with, who knows how much deflection you'll get while riding.

  9. #9
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    flip the wheel around (ie: cassette on non-drive side). if the wheel is the problem, it will be off center again, but in the opposite direction.

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