Results 1 to 21 of 21
  1. #1
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Posts
    32

    Wheel/Tire Upgrade Time?

    I need new tires and everyone I ride with keeps telling me, “save up your money and get some nice wheels/tires, you’ll never regret it”...easy for them to say as most of them have more money than they know what to do with……

    Little background: I'm not a racer, I ride for exercise and fun. These days I ride probably 75-100 miles per week on average. I weigh 180 lbs and my current setup is a specialized roubaix SL4 with fulcrum racing s four wheels with specialized turbo pro 25s tires (usually ride between 90-100 psi). I’ve only been biking a few years so I have no idea if the ride was good or bad on these wheels/tires. I can say the bike as a whole is a much better ride than my old crappy bike I started on to see whether I liked road biking or not….but that’s definitely an apples to oranges comparison. Bike has 105s 11 speed and axis 1.0 brakes (not great….) and roads are mostly flat asphalt with an occasional flat chip/seal for shorter stretches.


    Now the questions: considering I don’t race and I’m happy cruising somewhere between 15-17 mph on flat roads (depending on wind, mood, distance, etc), will I actually see a benefit with a wheel/tire upgrade? I don’t mind spending $300-500 / wheel if I will have a noticeably “better” ride. Would this price range not do this but maybe $750-1,000/wheel would? If so, I’d probably be ok with that as I’d simply save up a little longer and make the purchase later…..but spending double would really have to imply a “much better” ride. Thoughts on price range vs benefit? Say to heck with it, buy some new tires since I need them and be done with it? Or is upgrading a good idea? If so, which budget is a better bang for the buck?

    Side note, I’ve done some reading that a good combination for my use might be a 25C tire on a 19C or wider wheel? Would you agree or should I consider going to a 28 with a little less PSI for added comfort?


  2. #2
    tlg
    tlg is offline
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: tlg's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    10,221
    Quote Originally Posted by gasman777 View Post
    [COLOR=#222222][FONT="Verdana"]I need new tires and everyone I ride with keeps telling me, “save up your money and get some nice wheels/tires, you’ll never regret it”...easy for them to say as most of them have more money than they know what to do with……
    Lots of people regret spending lots of money for new wheels/tires and realize afterwards they're not significantly (if at all) faster/better.

    Little background: I'm not a racer, I ride for exercise and fun. These days I ride probably 75-100 miles per week on average. I weigh 180 lbs and my current setup is a specialized roubaix SL4 with fulcrum racing s four wheels with specialized turbo pro 25s tires (usually ride between 90-100 psi).
    I don't know anything about the specialized turbo pro but they seem to be rated ok.
    Can you go to 28's?


    Now the questions: considering I don’t race and I’m happy cruising somewhere between 15-17 mph on flat roads (depending on wind, mood, distance, etc), will I actually see a benefit with a wheel/tire upgrade?
    At 15-17mph you won't really see a benefit from areo wheels. Lighter wheels won't make you faster on flat roads either.
    Do you ride a lot of hills? Lighter wheels feel nicer on hills. And if you do a lot of sprinting.



    I don’t mind spending $300-500 / wheel if I will have a noticeably “better” ride.
    You won't have a noticeably better ride in that price range.

    Would this price range not do this but maybe $750-1,000/wheel would?
    Marginally "better".


    Say to heck with it, buy some new tires since I need them and be done with it?
    Try some new tires. 28's if you can.


    I suggest before buying new wheels, ask one of your buddies to borrow their "nice wheels" for a few rides. See how "better" you think they are and if worth the money to you.
    Some bike shops rent wheels too. You could try that route.
    Custom Di2 & Garmin/GoPro mounts 2013 SuperSix EVO Hi-MOD Team * 2004 Klein Aura V

  3. #3
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: Lombard's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    5,141
    Quote Originally Posted by tlg View Post
    Lots of people regret spending lots of money for new wheels/tires and realize afterwards they're not significantly (if at all) faster/better.

    I don't know anything about the specialized turbo pro but they seem to be rated ok.
    Can you go to 28's?


    At 15-17mph you won't really see a benefit from areo wheels. Lighter wheels won't make you faster on flat roads either.
    Do you ride a lot of hills? Lighter wheels feel nicer on hills. And if you do a lot of sprinting.



    You won't have a noticeably better ride in that price range.

    Marginally "better".


    Try some new tires. 28's if you can.


    I suggest before buying new wheels, ask one of your buddies to borrow their "nice wheels" for a few rides. See how "better" you think they are and if worth the money to you.
    Some bike shops rent wheels too. You could try that route.
    All good advice here from TLG. You probably won't notice a difference in performance. Definitely try changing tires to 28c if they will fit in your frame which you can run less pressure in. You will get a smoother ride.
    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein

    "Beware of geeks bearing formulas."
    -- Warren Buffett

    "Education is what you get when you read the fine print. Experience is what you get when you don't. -- Pete Seeger



  4. #4
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    7,733
    Tire size doesn't dictate ride quality alone. So don't just go out and buy any old 28mm tire to get an improvement. If you decide to get 28mm tires make sure they are at least as supple as what you currently use. A general guideline is the higher the TPI the more supple. Generally speaking as tires get more supple they get less flat resistant so you need to consider that.
    Last edited by Jay Strongbow; 03-27-2017 at 07:33 AM.

  5. #5
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Posts
    32
    good advice, I can't borrow their bike for long rides as I'm shorter than most of them are but you confirmed my suspicions on being worth it or not. I'll see if I can rent some.

    If the tires fit, any suggestions on 28s? I've read good things on continental 4000s.

  6. #6
    tlg
    tlg is offline
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: tlg's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    10,221
    Quote Originally Posted by gasman777 View Post
    good advice, I can't borrow their bike for long rides as I'm shorter than most of them are but you confirmed my suspicions on being worth it or not. I'll see if I can rent some.
    You're shorter? You mean your rides are shorter?
    Borrow them on a day when they're not riding. Ride a 10mi loop on their wheels. Then ride the same loop on your wheels.

    If the tires fit, any suggestions on 28s? I've read good things on continental 4000s.
    You can't go wrong with the GP4000's. Best bang for the buck. Not many tires have better rolling resistance, and none for the same price. Pretty much the only tire I run.
    FYI, they run a little oversize. Usually about 1mm. So if 28's are tight on your frame, the GP4000's could rub.
    Custom Di2 & Garmin/GoPro mounts 2013 SuperSix EVO Hi-MOD Team * 2004 Klein Aura V

  7. #7
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: Lombard's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    5,141
    Quote Originally Posted by Jay Strongbow View Post
    Tire size doesn't dictate ride quality alone. So don't just go out and buy any old 28mm tire to get an improvement. If you decide to get 28mm tires make sure they are at least as supple as what you currently use. A general guideline is the higher the TPI the more supple. Generally speaking as tires get more supple they get less flat resistant so you need to consider that.
    Really? If this is the case, why are puncture resistant tires the ones with lower thread counts? Lower counts = thicker threads. My Maxxis Refuse tires are only 60 TPI and they are the most bombproof road tires I've ever owned.
    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein

    "Beware of geeks bearing formulas."
    -- Warren Buffett

    "Education is what you get when you read the fine print. Experience is what you get when you don't. -- Pete Seeger



  8. #8
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    7,733
    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    Really? If this is the case, why are puncture resistant tires the ones with lower thread counts? Lower counts = thicker threads. My Maxxis Refuse tires are only 60 TPI and they are the most bombproof road tires I've ever owned.
    Read it again. And/or realize that higher TPI means more supple.

  9. #9
    A wheelist
    Reputation: Mike T.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    11,173
    Lots of good advice here and it boils down to "any wheels won't make you faster or will they ride "better". Yes get 28s if they will fit in the frame but at 180, 25s are ok aired around 80-100. Buy only he finest quality tires (4000s have decent rep).
    .
    Mike T's home wheelbuilding site - dedicated to providing Newby wheelbuilder's with motivation, information and resources.

    Everything above, up to that blue line, is IMO IMO.

  10. #10
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: Lombard's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    5,141
    Quote Originally Posted by Jay Strongbow View Post
    Read it again. And/or realize that higher TPI means more supple.

    I am not disagreeing with you that higher TPI = more supple. This is true. I am disagreeing with you that more supple = more puncture resistant. Not true.
    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein

    "Beware of geeks bearing formulas."
    -- Warren Buffett

    "Education is what you get when you read the fine print. Experience is what you get when you don't. -- Pete Seeger



  11. #11
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    7,733
    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    I am not disagreeing with you that higher TPI = more supple. This is true. I am disagreeing with you that more supple = more puncture resistant. Not true.
    Again, read it again.

  12. #12
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: Lombard's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    5,141
    Quote Originally Posted by Jay Strongbow View Post
    Again, read it again.
    Quote Originally Posted by Jay Strongbow View Post
    Generally speaking as tires get more supple they get less flat resistant so you need to consider that.
    Whoops! OK, my bad. Hey, it's a Monday.
    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein

    "Beware of geeks bearing formulas."
    -- Warren Buffett

    "Education is what you get when you read the fine print. Experience is what you get when you don't. -- Pete Seeger



  13. #13
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    7,733
    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    Whoops! OK, my bad. Hey, it's a Monday.
    That's okay. Monday mornings are rough.....I can definitely relate to that.

  14. #14
    Forever a Student
    Reputation: MMsRepBike's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Posts
    4,661
    Quote Originally Posted by gasman777 View Post
    good advice, I can't borrow their bike for long rides as I'm shorter than most of them are but you confirmed my suspicions on being worth it or not. I'll see if I can rent some.
    It doesn't matter how tall or short you are or they are.

    Everyone uses the same size wheels.

    You were told to borrow wheels, not bikes.

    Go borrow some wheels.
    use a torque wrench

  15. #15
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: Lombard's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    5,141
    Quote Originally Posted by MMsRepBike View Post
    You were told to borrow wheels, not bikes.

    Go borrow some wheels.
    This. That is, the next time someone tells you how great higher end wheels are and that you should buy some, ask if you can borrow their high end wheels for a ride.
    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein

    "Beware of geeks bearing formulas."
    -- Warren Buffett

    "Education is what you get when you read the fine print. Experience is what you get when you don't. -- Pete Seeger



  16. #16
    Wandering
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    170
    +1 on borrowing 'better' wheels.

    +1 on good tires ('good' meaning supple & with a low Crr from some of the testing articles).

    Another cheap thing to try is latex tubes. I went the expensive custom wheel route & chopped over a pound off weight & couldn't notice a difference (YMMV). However, I noticed the difference with latex tubes very quickly. If it was placebo, I would have felt a lot better if things were reversed ...
    --
    All the best,
    Ron
    Central-Western NJ, USA

    There's nothing in the middle of the road but yellow stripes and dead armadillos.
    --- James Allen Hightower

  17. #17
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    7,733
    Quote Originally Posted by RL7836 View Post
    Another cheap thing to try is latex tubes. I went the expensive custom wheel route & chopped over a pound off weight & couldn't notice a difference (YMMV). However, I noticed the difference with latex tubes very quickly. If it was placebo, I would have felt a lot better if things were reversed ...
    They are good for a 2 watts per wheel. I'm not sure if that's enough so if someone switched my tubes to latex without telling me I would noticed, but either way the watts savings is there so placebo or not there is definitely some 'real' benefit.

    I went on my first real ride with latex tubes yesterday. Tough to say if they help or if I was just having a good day but I certainly felt a little faster than usual.

  18. #18
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Posts
    11
    From my “limited” experience on a road bike in the last 3 years, my biggest gains in performance have been on the motor side. There’s no substitute for time in the saddle and cranking out the watts like it was your last ride ever.

  19. #19
    Neophyte
    Reputation: jetdog9's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    1,337
    I've ridden mostly Turbo Pro tires for a long time and like them a lot. Their rate of wear seems pretty good, too. That said, it could be good to try something else. Most people I know are either on some form of Conti GP 4000's or Michelin.

    As for the wheels, for a lot of us rec riders it's probably more of a placebo affect than anything else, but bling is fun if you can afford it. I have DA 9000-C24's that I am happy with, but I think I would have been happier if I'd shelled out the $$$ for C35's the last time they had a good sale on them.

  20. #20
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Posts
    39
    There definitely is a difference in feeling between a 14mm rim and a 20mm rim like Belgium+.

  21. #21
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: Lombard's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    5,141
    Quote Originally Posted by MudSnow View Post
    There definitely is a difference in feeling between a 14mm rim and a 20mm rim like Belgium+.

    Oh yes, absolutely. My point before was that you won't feel the difference between a 17mm and an 18mm rim. At least I didn't.
    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein

    "Beware of geeks bearing formulas."
    -- Warren Buffett

    "Education is what you get when you read the fine print. Experience is what you get when you don't. -- Pete Seeger



Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 3
    Last Post: 10-06-2015, 01:02 PM
  2. Value Wheel/Tire Upgrade
    By amlemus in forum Wheels and Tires
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 08-21-2014, 09:00 AM
  3. Tire/Wheel Upgrade
    By seanlove22 in forum Wheels and Tires
    Replies: 23
    Last Post: 11-27-2011, 10:25 PM
  4. Tarmac Comp wheel/tire upgrade
    By adauphin in forum Wheels and Tires
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 08-02-2009, 08:24 PM
  5. wheel upgrade time - how much speed?
    By bigwaves in forum Wheels and Tires
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: 11-01-2005, 08:11 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •