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  1. #1
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    Wheelset for travel bike

    I bought a Ritchey Break-Away frame a month ago and built it up with an old 105 group from 10 years ago. I*love* the bike. It has already been to Tuscany and O'ahu with me and took me on some epic rides that I will not forget.

    The 105 group is performing fine but the wheelset is a 10 year old Ritchey Pro that should be repurposed to trainer duties. The rear hub had gritty bearings. I rebuilt it as best as I could but it does not inspire the confidence needed to carry me on a ride in the middle of nowhere. Or any ride for that matter.

    I would like to build a reliable wheelset of reasonable weight. Budget was $500 but can be stretched. My weight is 165 lb.
    Ideally, components should be fixable at any bike shop around the world.
    The wheel needs to be compatible with Shimano 11-spd as this is what is on my other ride and I want to be able to swap wheels between bike: this new wheelset may be used as a "winter" set (quotes because we are talking California winter).

    With this long winded intro, I would like to hear your thoughts on the following build:

    Front:
    Dura Ace 9000 hub, Sapim Race spokes, Brass Nipples, DT RR440 rim
    24 spokes radial lacing *this is to help with packing: left crank arm has to fit through spokes*
    Weight= 726 g.

    Rear:
    Dura Ace 9000, Sapim Race spokes, Brass Nipples, DT RR440 Asymmetric rim
    28 spokes 3x lacing
    Weight= 886 g

    Total cost of components should be $650. This seems like a lot when I paid just $30 more for some blingy Fulcrum Race Zero. But I don't want to consider packing those fancy bladed Al spoked wheels into a travel case.

  2. #2
    Online Wheel Builder
    Reputation: Zen Cyclery's Avatar
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    It would be doable to go with a build that is lighter than the one you mentioned while still staying within your price range. White Industries T11 hubs laced to Archetypes would be significantly lighter, while still being super easy to service.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zen Cyclery View Post
    It would be doable to go with a build that is lighter than the one you mentioned while still staying within your price range. White Industries T11 hubs laced to Archetypes would be significantly lighter, while still being super easy to service.
    Been there, done that. The dimensions of the T11 are just poor. I have posted my experience with a set of T11/C2 wheels before. Others with more experience than me have posted to the same effect. I would not lace the T11 to a non-offset rim and certainly not for a travel wheel (have you ever seen how tight things are in a break-away bike case?).

  4. #4
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    My usual suggestion in response to threads like this is to consider the new Neuvation R28SWCX wheels. 22mm wide welded rim, Sapim cx ray spokes, 1470gm, $495. I believe these are Shimano 11 speed compatible.
    ... 'cuz that's how I roll.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by looigi View Post
    I believe these are Shimano 11 speed compatible.
    Everything I find on their website says shimano 10 speed.
    I recall a few threads about folks commenting on the poor durability of those wheels. Any idea about how fixable those hubs are?

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by FuelForThought View Post
    Everything I find on their website says shimano 10 speed.
    I recall a few threads about folks commenting on the poor durability of those wheels. Any idea about how fixable those hubs are?
    Yep. Looks like they're Campy 11 speed but not Shimano/SRAM.

    On any production wheels, if there's enough of them in circulation, there will be threads about problems. In my case, I've had no issues with a set but many with a newer set of HED Ardennes that cost over twice as much. There are many sets in use around here with no problems I'm aware of (including by an LBS owner, who of course sells just about everything but). The hubs use replaceable cartridge bearings and customer support is excellent.
    ... 'cuz that's how I roll.

  7. #7
    Matnlely Dregaend
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    I can't speak to 11 speed compatibility, but I have owned a Breakaway since 2008. The wheels get DESTROYED during travel, as does the case. Spending big $ on the wheels is idiocy IMHO. I personally use Neuvation M28 aero wheels I got on close-out for $149. They're solid, not crazy heavy, and easy to true, which is something you'll be doing a lot of.
    Last edited by DrSmile; 05-18-2013 at 10:23 AM.
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  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by DrSmile View Post
    I can't speak to 11 speed compatibility, but I have owned a Breakaway since 2008. The wheels get DESTROYED during travel, as does the case. Spending big $ on the wheels is idiocy IMHO. I personally use Neuvation M28 aero wheels I got on close-out for $149. They're solid, not crazy heavy, and easy to true, which is something you'll be doing a lot of.
    This makes sense to me. You will also probably meet bad roads in unknown cities that will be hard on the wheels too. I do like your original wheels though. DA hubs and DT rims are very good and stout. I would do 28F and 32R for increased durability on them though.
    Embrace the fact that everyone on these forums has their own unique desires, needs, experiences and environment so what works for you may not work for others.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by DrSmile View Post
    I can't speak to 11 speed compatibility, but I have owned a Breakaway since 2008. The wheels get DESTROYED during travel, as does the case. Spending big $ on the wheels is idiocy IMHO. I personally use Neuvation M28 aero wheels I got on close-out for $149. They're solid, not crazy heavy, and easy to true, which is something you'll be doing a lot of.
    Great advice. Only 2 trips on the BAB and I already bent the rear derailleur hanger. Things do get crunched up in this case.

    I decided to go cheap and get stronger rims. BHS C472w/Novatec hubs, 20f, 28r. $333 total. Kept spoke count low to ease packing and will keep two of each spoke taped up inside the case. For those of you who have not packed up one of these travel bikes, you need to fit the bar into the rear wheel spokes and the left crankarm into the front wheel spokes. Does not help that I ride a 58 cm.

  10. #10
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    Changing the subject slightly (although there was the remark about wheels getting destroyed) - I looked into getting a breakaway, including looking at the case dimensions. They exceed the standard of what is allowed on the airlines I looked at. (I cannot remember the numbers now but it was by several inches). And Ritchey Dave agreed. So, spending all that money would not guarantee no excess charges anyway, especially if you take another case as well. With my hard shell bike case I'm taking a bike to the UK tomorrow for a $30 excess charge. Seems reasonable to me.
    There's sometimes a buggy.
    How many drivers does a buggy have?

    One.

    So let's just say I'm drivin' this buggy...
    and if you fix your attitude you can ride along with me.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GekiIMh4ZkM

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by bikerjulio View Post
    Changing the subject slightly (although there was the remark about wheels getting destroyed) - I looked into getting a breakaway, including looking at the case dimensions. They exceed the standard of what is allowed on the airlines I looked at. (I cannot remember the numbers now but it was by several inches). And Ritchey Dave agreed. So, spending all that money would not guarantee no excess charges anyway, especially if you take another case as well. With my hard shell bike case I'm taking a bike to the UK tomorrow for a $30 excess charge. Seems reasonable to me.
    $30 is very cheap. Which airline? United charges $150 each way. 4 return trips and the BAB pays for itself.

    BAB case is 62 in L +D + W which is considered the max size for "regular" luggage. Ritchey has a standard disclaimer that you *may* get hit with surcharges but from what I gather, this is a non-issue.

  12. #12
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    I'm in Toronto In fact until the last couple of years it was free on Transat. Now it's $30.

    But I agree, the decision is obviously about the economics of it.
    There's sometimes a buggy.
    How many drivers does a buggy have?

    One.

    So let's just say I'm drivin' this buggy...
    and if you fix your attitude you can ride along with me.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GekiIMh4ZkM

  13. #13
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    I have made 30 trips by now (including several international) with my Ritchey breakaway and was never charged a fee. So the fear of excess charges is way overblown.

    I am surprised you can fly to UK with regular frame for $30. What airline is that? Air France? United charges $200 for one-way flight international and $100 for domestic, and most US airlines will charge $50-$100 for one way travel domestically.

  14. #14
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    sorry should have read your reply first. I am surprised Transat charges only $30 for full bike.
    In my travel I saved $2,300 in airline fees alone on my Ritchey - in about 1.5 years. Of course it makes less sense for someone who travels once a year.

    However, Ritchey also is very helpful in travel to/from airports (especially when renting cars or using taxies, which tend to be on the small size in Europe and Asia) - smaller suitcase size helps a lot.
    Also, it's actually a top notch steel frame that I use a lot when I am not traveling, doubles as my CX bike and I take it to club rides once in a while. It's a great purchase.

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