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  1. #1
    n00bsauce
    Reputation: Mel Erickson's Avatar
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    Would you ride this wheel?

    6 yr. old Bontrager Race Lite rear wheel with a hairline crack at a spoke hole extending about 1/8" down the side of the rim. The wheel will be replaced but would you ride it for the week or two it takes?
    "Those who can make you believe absurdities can make you commit atrocities." Voltaire

    There are your fog people & your sun people, he said. I said I wasn't sure which kind I was. He nodded. Fog'll do that to you, he said.

    "We are all ignorant about most things."
    Mel Erickson

  2. #2
    A wheelist
    Reputation: Mike T.'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mel Erickson View Post
    6 yr. old Bontrager Race Lite rear wheel with a hairline crack at a spoke hole extending about 1/8" down the side of the rim. The wheel will be replaced but would you ride it for the week or two it takes?
    You don't have another wheel kicking around that you could switch? I'm sure I could lay my hand to about 5 rear wheels. You're into cycling enough to do 13,000+ posts and you only have one rear wheel?
    .
    Mike The Bike's home wheelbuilding info - dedicated to providing Newby wheelbuilder information and motivation.

    I'm not cranky; I just have a violent reaction to stupid people.

  3. #3
    For Rent
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    I ride too much to post more than I have. I can't imagine having time to post over 7,000 times.
    You mean you can't use a road bike on a downhill course?

  4. #4
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    To answer your question, no, I wouldn't.

  5. #5
    A wheelist
    Reputation: Mike T.'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Davoosie View Post
    I ride too much to post more than I have. I can't imagine having time to post over 7,000 times.
    I'm -

    • A member here since this site opened ('97?) no matter what "2004" says (year they changed to the new BB)
    • Retired (would love to ride 7 days week/4hrs day but can't recover from it).
    • Consumed by my sport/lifestyle/hobby. I'm into it 18 hrs/day.
    .
    Mike The Bike's home wheelbuilding info - dedicated to providing Newby wheelbuilder information and motivation.

    I'm not cranky; I just have a violent reaction to stupid people.

  6. #6
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mel Erickson View Post
    6 yr. old Bontrager Race Lite rear wheel with a hairline crack at a spoke hole extending about 1/8" down the side of the rim. The wheel will be replaced but would you ride it for the week or two it takes?
    The crack may have started yesterday or it may have been there for weeks. The only way you can tell is to ride the wheel and see how fast the crack grows. There's no way to reliably predict failure of a crack in an aluminum rim. I've ridden cracked rims for a few weeks and not seen the cracks grow. I've had spokes pull through in a very short time.

  7. #7
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    Yeah. I've ridden wheels with cracks around spoke holes for many miles. There's certainly some risk, but the rim is in compression and the cracks are due to the spoke nipple pulling through. It'll likely just pull through a little more loosening the spoke and causing the wheel to go out of true.
    ... 'cuz that's how I roll.

  8. #8
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    While the rim may fail by a nipple pulling through. It should act like a broken spoke.

    This might sound a bit odd but cracks continue in part due to the stress riser created at the end of the crack (there is in effect a very small radius at the end of the crack that collects all the stress). One can reduce the stress riser by drilling a small hole at the very end of the crack. The hole will have a larger radius than the end of the crack and thus will help distribute the stress around the hole. Since the rim is junk, drilling a hole might stop the crack from progressing. if you look at the slot in the frame at the top of your seat tube you might see a round hole at the bottom. That hole is to reduce the stress riser. Drilling a hole at the end of the crack would serve the same purpose. I cannot say I know the ideal size of hole, but I would think 1/16" might work.

    I would ride that on smooth roads and no crazy descents, perferably within walking distance of the house.

  9. #9
    n00bsauce
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    Thank you Kerry, loogi and Blue. These thoughts are helpful. I have a new set of wheels on the way but I think I'll ride these until they get here but take it easy.
    "Those who can make you believe absurdities can make you commit atrocities." Voltaire

    There are your fog people & your sun people, he said. I said I wasn't sure which kind I was. He nodded. Fog'll do that to you, he said.

    "We are all ignorant about most things."
    Mel Erickson

  10. #10
    Get me to In&Out
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    HTFU and ride it. It is just skin.
    Cyclists really need to learn a little Rule #5.

  11. #11
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    I wouldn't recommend it on a paired spoke wheel. Since there are so few spoke under such high tension it will likely taco the wheel when it gives out. Sorry but that's why they suck. You could get away with it on a higher spoke count traditionally laced hoop

  12. #12
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by spookyload View Post
    HTFU and ride it. It is just skin.
    Pretty unlikely a failure will incur skin loss. Most likely, the spoke will get loose but won't be free so it won't be able to jam anything as a broken spoke might. The wheel may go out of true enough to rub the brakes and even the stays in which case it may be possible to loosen opposing spoke(s) to true the wheel enough to make it home, or you make a call and catch a ride back.
    ... 'cuz that's how I roll.

  13. #13
    n00bsauce
    Reputation: Mel Erickson's Avatar
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    Good thought.
    "Those who can make you believe absurdities can make you commit atrocities." Voltaire

    There are your fog people & your sun people, he said. I said I wasn't sure which kind I was. He nodded. Fog'll do that to you, he said.

    "We are all ignorant about most things."
    Mel Erickson

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