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Thread: Yoeleo

  1. #1
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    Yoeleo

    Morning I am new to this forum and this is my first post, I am considering buying 50mm carbon wheels from yeoleo for my ribble r872.
    can I ask you're experiences and help with this seller.

    regards.

    scott.

    Custom Bike Wheels - Best Custom Carbon Bike Wheels Yoeleo

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    Heaps about them in the 'Ebay and Chinese Direct Carbon Wheel Thread 2.0' above. I prefer Farsport myself as they use Sapim CX Ray spokes. But I read you can get tubeless from Yoeleo. Might take a bit of reading but all the details there. I'd start from the last entry of the thread and go back though so you get the most up to date info.

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    Thanks for the quick reply and advise I will start reading.


    cheers.

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    Yoeleo

    I have three sets of there wheels. They are very strong wheels never had a problem with the carbon rims. Great buy. Very nice to deal with. Two weeks delivery once it leaves and arrives in California

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    Quote Originally Posted by horvatht View Post
    I have three sets of there wheels. They are very strong wheels never had a problem with the carbon rims. Great buy. Very nice to deal with. Two weeks delivery once it leaves and arrives in California
    Excellent I think that's persuaded me to buy these. They emailed me suggesting these wheels. Which hub did you go for ?.

    Carbon Wheels 25mm - Chinese Carbon Racing Wheels 25mm Width Yoeleo

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    Yoeleo

    One set of wheels have the ceramic bearings. And the others didn't
    I didn't notice any difference they both rolled great. The last set was the super light weight climbing wheels. These things are like 980 grams super light weight. I was a light afraid going down hill. So far I pushed these wheels to 38mph. No problem and hubs roll great. PS the 60 mm w ceramic bearings I pushed to 48 down hill. Super scary but the wheels feel great. Tell Katrina Tom says hi. She is super in customer service.

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    Tom thanks for the info, down hill I possibly equal that speed now on shimano r501s obviously with the carbon I will take it easy at first to get used. I'm dealing with a lady called Zoe, very plesent and helpful.

    scott.

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    I've purchased rims from them in the past, they have a nice selection of tubular rims.
    No issues, decent product and easy to deal with.

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    I purchased a set of the 25mm wide u-shape wheels in 50mm depth rims. Only have about 300+ miles on them but so far they are good.

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    Quality thanks for the all your replays I have taken the plunge and purchased today and Zoe gave me a little discount to :-)

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    Quote Originally Posted by 6161661 View Post
    Hey man, can you share Zoe's email, I am trying to get a discount too.


    yoeleoservice@gmail.com and address it to Zoe, mention Scott Bennett as I am in regular contact regarding other products.

    im contemplating purchasing carbon seat @95gram & seat post.

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    I also want to buy one set 50mm clincher wheels,but i need ceramic bearing with hubs,they offer this or not?

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    You will have to enquire with them or visit there web site
    Last edited by skott80; 01-07-2014 at 10:22 PM.

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    I recently received a set of 25 x 60mm SAT clinchers from them. Aside from a issue with one of the brake tracks having a ridge in it, the wheels seem to be pretty good. I am working with Leo to see if we can resolve the brake track issue.
    Yoeleo-wheels-1641_1.jpg
    I really want to know if anyone here has run their SAT rims tubeless and if so did they tape them first to decrease the amount of space between the rim hook and bed? I now tape is not needed but the large amount of space make me nervous.

    My wheels came in at 1641 grams, a bit over the 1583+/-10g/set quoted on the website.

    Cheers~

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    Quote Originally Posted by cyclist001 View Post
    but i need ceramic bearing with hubs
    Why?`

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    Quote Originally Posted by MLC1 View Post
    I purchased a set of the 25mm wide u-shape wheels in 50mm depth rims. Only have about 300+ miles on them but so far they are good.
    Curious, did the wheelset weight match what was on their website?

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    I would not ride Chinese carbon wheels downhill. No freakin way. Their resin is not anywhere close to dealing with heat like wheels made in Europe and the US. On the flat, ok. Downhill, no.

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    Quote Originally Posted by aclinjury View Post
    I would not ride Chinese carbon wheels downhill. No freakin way. Their resin is not anywhere close to dealing with heat like wheels made in Europe and the US. On the flat, ok. Downhill, no.
    I could probably count on one hand how many carbon wheels are made in Europe and the US. I'm glad the Chinese got a hold of some of that good ole US resin when they built my wheels. Mine are holding up fine and they see a lot of descending. As with any carbon brake track wheel, you have to know how to modulate your brakes while descending (not just reserved for Chinese wheels).
    If you try to fail, and succeed, which have you done?

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    I'm not really here to persuade anyone that they shouldn't buy a Chinese carbon wheels under any circumstance. However, it is a fact that most if not all cheap Chinese carbon wheelsets have a lower glass transition temp those made in the US, Europe, or even Taiwan. This is a fact, and you can research this up yourself.

    Zipp, Enve are two US made brands that have a much higher glass transition temp than any no-name Chinese wheelset. I believe Zipp has a peak of at least 232C glass transition temp (could be higher, but I don't recall exactly here).

    Velocite wheelset is a Taiwanese brand but they claim that their wheelset have met the EU safety, and has a 192C peak glass transition temp

    FastForward is a Netherlands brand have to meet minumum EU safety, and part of that is to meet the mininum glass transition temp.

    A lot of the cheap Chinese carbon rim have their peak temps in the 150C range. I don't recall the exact number, but I do recall it's a lot lower than the 192C number of Velocite.

    Firecrest Revolution - YouTube

    Velocite RT50 Testing Video - Full Carbon Road Tubeless Wheels. - YouTube

    Considering that a carbon rim failure due to excess heat is a real possibility, I would not be so quick to discount this glass transition temp criteria if one plans to use the wheelset to descend much. And the whole idea behind a safety margin, or a safety standard, is that you know what you're dealing with, and that the margin is there for you in case you ever need it.

    The question is not whether a reputable US/EU/Twainese brand has superior quality compared to a cheap Chinese wheelset, but whether you want to pay for this safety in case you ever need it.

    And I would be most curious to see video a temperature testing of a cheap Chinese brand. Let's see some numbers. No numbers, then it's just guessing.
    Last edited by aclinjury; 01-09-2014 at 08:43 PM.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by aclinjury View Post
    I'm not really here to persuade anyone that they shouldn't buy a Chinese carbon wheels under any circumstance. However, it is a fact that most if not all cheap Chinese carbon wheelsets have a lower glass transition temp those made in the US, Europe, or even Taiwan. This is a fact, and you can research this up yourself.

    Zipp, Enve are two US made brands that have a much higher glass transition temp than any no-name Chinese wheelset. I believe Zipp has a peak of at least 232C glass transition temp (could be higher, but I don't recall exactly here).

    Velocite wheelset is a Taiwanese brand but they claim that their wheelset have met the EU safety, and has a 192C peak glass transition temp

    FastForward is a Netherlands brand have to meet minumum EU safety, and part of that is to meet the mininum glass transition temp.

    A lot of the cheap Chinese carbon rim have their peak temps in the 150C range. I don't recall the exact number, but I do recall it's a lot lower than the 192C number of Velocite.

    Firecrest Revolution - YouTube

    Velocite RT50 Testing Video - Full Carbon Road Tubeless Wheels. - YouTube

    Considering that a carbon rim failure due to excess heat is a real possibility, I would not be so quick to discount this glass transition temp criteria if one plans to use the wheelset to descend much. And the whole idea behind a safety margin, or a safety standard, is that you know what you're dealing with, and that the margin is there for you in case you ever need it.

    The question is not whether a reputable US/EU/Twainese brand has superior quality compared to a cheap Chinese wheelset, but whether you want to pay for this safety in case you ever need it.

    And I would be most curious to see video a temperature testing of a cheap Chinese brand. Let's see some numbers. No numbers, then it's just guessing.
    There is a short and steep section that I ride once in a while. Only about a third of a mile long but max. grade is 22% and average is 13%. At the bottom is a tee intersection which means you are on your brakes hard while descending.

    One day I decided to feel my brake track as soon as I got to the bottom. I was using 25mm deep aluminum wheels. The brake track was so hot to the touch that you couldn't hold your hand against it. I did the same run with my 50mm deep carbon wheels with the basalt braking track and the brake track was only warm to the touch. This section is so steep that you aren't able to modulate between front and rear brakes. You are hard on both brakes.

    Maybe they have a lower peak temperature (I really don't know) but at least with my set, it would take quite the descent to get them to the melting point.
    If you try to fail, and succeed, which have you done?

  21. #21
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    Attach a $20 Infrared Thermometer

    Name:  09570-01_i_ma.jpg
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    pointing to the wheel's brake track, positioned right behind the brake pad, to sense the temperature.

    Connect that to the I2C input port of your bike computer or to a standalone display. If you use the right standalone display, it'll be somewhat like the inverse of the engine rev indicator LED strip at the top of an F1 steering wheel (or on the dash of a Honda S2000 car). To make it light weight, use flexible OLED taped to your handlebar for the display.

    From the web page, the specs are:

    The MLX90614 is factory calibrated in wide temperature ranges: -40 to 85C for the ambient temperature and -70 to 382.2C for the object temperature. The measured value is the average temperature of all objects in the Field Of View of the sensor. The MLX90614 offers a standard accuracy of 0.5C around room temperatures.

    If temperature gets too high, you're still in trouble, but at least you'll know ahead of time.

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    Quote Originally Posted by redondoaveb View Post
    the basalt braking track and the brake track was only warm to the touch
    I have found the same thing with my Farsports wheels. I don't know whether it's because the heat dissipates more evenly throughout the wheel due to the basalt surface, or the heat goes onto the brake pad more than onto the wheel. Aluminum is a poor heat conductor, so localized heating on it is to be expected.

  23. #23
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    The day as arrived and my wheels will be delivered this afternoon. Mine are also of a basalt breaking surface but for the first few rides I will be taking it easy down hill as the uk weather is quite wet and windy at the moment.
    you have to accept in life that products can and will fail at some point, you only have to drive along a road and you will see brand new cars 60k broken down at the side of the road.
    There are very good reviews with these wheels and the service is 1st class with this I hope there product matches.

    I will report back tomorrow after if my new cassette is also delivered today as I have a little 30mile hill session planned tomorrow morning.

    Scott.
    (if I don't report back don't buy ;-))

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by redondoaveb View Post
    There is a short and steep section that I ride once in a while. Only about a third of a mile long but max. grade is 22% and average is 13%. At the bottom is a tee intersection which means you are on your brakes hard while descending.

    One day I decided to feel my brake track as soon as I got to the bottom. I was using 25mm deep aluminum wheels. The brake track was so hot to the touch that you couldn't hold your hand against it. I did the same run with my 50mm deep carbon wheels with the basalt braking track and the brake track was only warm to the touch. This section is so steep that you aren't able to modulate between front and rear brakes. You are hard on both brakes.

    Maybe they have a lower peak temperature (I really don't know) but at least with my set, it would take quite the descent to get them to the melting point.
    The reason why the aluminum feels so much hotter is because aluminum conducts heat better than carbon.

    Heat and temperature are related concept but they have subtle differences. I'll use this example that is used in all physics 101 class. You touch a metal pole at room temperature and your hand feels like it's touching a "cold" object, right. Now, if you touch a wooden pole also at room temperature but your hand doesn't feel like it's as cold compared to touching the metal pole. But the metal pole and wooden pole have the exact content of heat energy in them (because both are at room temperature), then why should the metal pole feels colder to the touch? Reason is because metals conduct heat much better than woods.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by aclinjury View Post
    The reason why the aluminum feels so much hotter is because aluminum conducts heat better than carbon.

    Heat and temperature are related concept but they have subtle differences. I'll use this example that is used in all physics 101 class. You touch a metal pole at room temperature and your hand feels like it's touching a "cold" object, right. Now, if you touch a wooden pole also at room temperature but your hand doesn't feel like it's as cold compared to touching the metal pole. But the metal pole and wooden pole have the exact content of heat energy in them (because both are at room temperature), then why should the metal pole feels colder to the touch? Reason is because metals conduct heat much better than woods.
    Bottom line for me anyway is that I'm not sure if my wheels will ever fail but for them to fail due to heat build up is not on my list of concerns.
    If you try to fail, and succeed, which have you done?

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