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Thread: chain cleaning

  1. #26
    bas
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    I've used it to clean my chain - it is not exactly effective. The chain cleaners
    that are sold are much better.


    http://consumer.simplegreen.com/cons_faqs.php

    Aluminum - Is it safe to use Simple Green on aluminum?
    Simple Green products have been successfully and safely used on aircraft, automotive, industrial and consumer aluminum items for over 20 years. However, caution and common sense must be used: Aluminum is a soft metal that easily corrodes with unprotected exposure to water. The aqueous-base and alkalinity of Simple Green or Crystal Simple Green can accelerate the corrosion process. Therefore, contact times of All-Purpose Simple Green and Crystal Simple Green with unprotected or unpainted aluminum surfaces should be kept as brief as the job will allow - never for more than 10 minutes. Large cleaning jobs should be conducted in smaller-area stages to achieve lower contact time. Rinsing after cleaning should always be extremely thorough - paying special attention to flush out cracks and crevices to remove all Simple Green/Crystal Simple Green residues. Unfinished, uncoated or unpainted aluminum cleaned with Simple Green products should receive some sort of protectant after cleaning to prevent oxidation.

  2. #27
    GIMME MY BIKE!
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    Quote Originally Posted by carreraRC
    Therefore, the best way is with a few cheap and still brushes. Ideally, you should have a workstand. If not just lean the bike against the wall. Spray a good amoung of degresser. The best I have found is called "Big Orange" Let this soak for a minute. Then hold the brush against the rear cassette and move the chain backwards (so the bike doesn't take off) As you do this, you can move the brush around. After a minuate, spray with a light nozzle hose. Repeat until you can touch the chain without getting any black stuff on your fingers. Then re-lube and your good to go. BTW, campys lubrication is the best stuff made, period. Good luck.
    Unfortunately, Big Orange has been declared environmentally unsound... they no longer make it. Clean Streak is a good (if not better) alternative.

  3. #28
    Any ride...
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    White Lightning

    I've used White Lightning for thousands of road miles; I wipe the chain, and apply every ride or two (usually every 40-50 miles). I've not noticed that the chain appears unprotected after a century, let alone after a mere 15 miles. My chains go 5000-6000 miles before they measure out to warrant replacement (either by the ruler method, or the park tool that my favorite bike shop uses). I also don't get any notable build up, but I tend to be meticulous about application.
    Last edited by BOppy; 07-27-2005 at 12:16 PM.

  4. #29
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    second that..

    Quote Originally Posted by Kerry Irons
    Assuming we're talking road riding, use the following technique for successful ProLink or homebrew lube (1 part motor oil to 3-4 parts odorless mineral spirits) application and use:

    1 - wipe the chain, cogs, pulleys, and chainrings clean with a rag.
    2 - drip on lube while pedaling (forward is better) so that the chain just starts to drip lube. Aim the lube between the side plates and between the bushings and the side plates.
    3 - run through all the gears several times, front and back.
    4 - wipe the chain, cogs, pulleys, and chainrings clean with a rag.
    5 - repeat steps 2-4 if the chain was really dirty

    If you do this every 300 miles or so (or when you get caught in the rain), you will not get any significant gunky buildup, and you won't have to clean the chain.

    No lube is "perfect." A brite shiny chain that is clean to the touch but is well lubed and gives long mileage is still not possible. IMO, ProLink is the best compromise.

    the motor oil and mineral spirit mix works well for both cleaning and lubing a chain...
    the only problem is the black residue that forms very quickly (often after every ride) and the thin oil does seem to get quite a few places...if you don't mind cleaning and polishing often, then go for it. I don't mind as its a good way to notice other problems/concerns if you're that intimate with your bike so often...found a frame crack that way last year..saved my a&* probably...

  5. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by bigbill
    I use a old plastic gatorade powder container with automotive degreaser and shake it up and let it sit while I am cleaning the rest of the bike.
    I use the same container but with mineral spirits. I modified mine. I taped a battery powered "source of vibration" to mine. Clip in some rechargeable AA's and let run overnight. No scrubbing.

  6. #31

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    After Chain Cleaning - Another Q

    Hey All,

    I'm a noob to bicycling and not mechanically inclined to boot. After reading this thread and the other one, I decided to get the Park Tools cleaner (LBS also recommended it for me). After a half an hour and a large mess afterwards, I think I got the chain clean. The chain fell off the front chainring a couple of times in the process. I put the chain back on (properly I hope). It still shifts properly ... I think I got that right. Wiped the frame and rear cassette with shop towel.

    For lube, I used the stuff the LBS gave me, Tri-Flow Superior Lubricant with Teflon. Pricey stuff and it smells really oily. After lubing the chain, I left the bike overnight and this morning, wiped the chain down with a shop towel.

    While the chain looks cleaner, when I pedal, the rear cassette makes a gurgle sort of noise (almost as if thick fluid is sloshing around inside).

    So, I guess this means that I did something wrong. Any ideas on how to fix this noise? Is it serious?

    Thanks.

    Wes

  7. #32

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    Quote Originally Posted by QLqBNSDS
    Hey All,

    I'm a noob to bicycling and not mechanically inclined to boot. After reading this thread and the other one, I decided to get the Park Tools cleaner (LBS also recommended it for me). After a half an hour and a large mess afterwards, I think I got the chain clean. The chain fell off the front chainring a couple of times in the process. I put the chain back on (properly I hope). It still shifts properly ... I think I got that right. Wiped the frame and rear cassette with shop towel.

    For lube, I used the stuff the LBS gave me, Tri-Flow Superior Lubricant with Teflon. Pricey stuff and it smells really oily. After lubing the chain, I left the bike overnight and this morning, wiped the chain down with a shop towel.

    While the chain looks cleaner, when I pedal, the rear cassette makes a gurgle sort of noise (almost as if thick fluid is sloshing around inside).

    So, I guess this means that I did something wrong. Any ideas on how to fix this noise? Is it serious?

    Thanks.

    Wes
    Tri-Flow isn't good for chains. It's far too thin and generally leaves an oily mess. Chain-specific lubes usually use a solvent ("mineral spirits" or some other type of petroleum distillate) that thins out the oil it is mixed with to allow it to penetrate to the rollers of the chain (the only real place lube is needed). The solvent evaporates and leaves the thicker oil behind. Tri-flow basically flows out of the rollers as easily as it flows in and just leaves things messy. It's good for things like cable housing, brake/derailleur pivots, etc. where mechanical wear isn't as much of a concern. Try cleaning off the exterior of the chain with a rag and then apply a chain lube. The chain lube should flush out the teflon, there is no need to use any degreaser. I usually recommend Pro-Link or Finish Line Wet formula. Both seem to work well IME for varied weather conditions.

  8. #33
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    Not completely true

    Quote Originally Posted by Anti-gravity
    Tri-Flow isn't good for chains. It's far too thin and generally leaves an oily mess. Chain-specific lubes usually use a solvent ("mineral spirits" or some other type of petroleum distillate) that thins out the oil it is mixed with to allow it to penetrate to the rollers of the chain (the only real place lube is needed). The solvent evaporates and leaves the thicker oil behind. Tri-flow basically flows out of the rollers as easily as it flows in and just leaves things messy. It's good for things like cable housing, brake/derailleur pivots, etc. where mechanical wear isn't as much of a concern. Try cleaning off the exterior of the chain with a rag and then apply a chain lube. The chain lube should flush out the teflon, there is no need to use any degreaser. I usually recommend Pro-Link or Finish Line Wet formula. Both seem to work well IME for varied weather conditions.
    Actually, if you could ride in a vacuum, TriFlow is an excellent lube. In very rough weather, it is one of the most durable lubes available. Anti-gravity is right though, that it leaves an oily mess and so attracts a lot of dirt. Great lubricating properties, but the dirt attraction problem cancels that advantage. I'm a ProLink fan, as it gives the best balance of lubrication (nearly as good as TriFlow) without nearly as much of a dirt attraction problem. The ProLink concept (high performance lube in a solvent) appears to be the best balance available today.

  9. #34

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    Hmmmm

    Quote Originally Posted by Kerry Irons
    Actually, if you could ride in a vacuum, TriFlow is an excellent lube. In very rough weather, it is one of the most durable lubes available. Anti-gravity is right though, that it leaves an oily mess and so attracts a lot of dirt. Great lubricating properties, but the dirt attraction problem cancels that advantage. I'm a ProLink fan, as it gives the best balance of lubrication (nearly as good as TriFlow) without nearly as much of a dirt attraction problem. The ProLink concept (high performance lube in a solvent) appears to be the best balance available today.
    I'm not really convinced Tri-Flow is good on chains even in your hypothetical scenario. I've put it on a chain once, and have also worked on multiple customer's bikes who have Tri-Flowed their chains. When I lubed it myself, I waited for ~10 minutes for it to soak in then wiped off the excess. It seemed like practically all of it came off on the wrag. I ran through the gears to work it in some more, wiped the chain again and more lube came off with the rag. I've done the same with customer bikes where I wipe the chain clean, run through the gears, and more lube seems to come out. Just seems too thin to me. But whatever, just my experience, not really an important argument. Maybe you have some lab data or something. Atleast we agree that it isn't good for chains in real life .

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