Cycle-Ops Flywheel Weight and Cycle-Ops vs Giant Trainer
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  1. #1
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    Cycle-Ops Flywheel Weight and Cycle-Ops vs Giant Trainer

    I was wondering if anyone here knows how much the flywheel on the CycleOps Mag+ Trainer weighs?

    I'm going back and forth between the Giant Mag Trainer and the CycleOps Mag+ Trainer and have a hard time deciding.

    They are both within $10 of one another, and both have the remote adjuster switch.

    Thanks
    Brad.

  2. #2
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    Just curious why you're concerned about flywheel weight.

    Assuming you're thinking heavier will better simulate road riding, that's probably true (to a point). But IME, once you notch up the resistance level, that resistance overcomes the momentum of the flywheel, rendering its weight moot.

  3. #3
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    Its more of trying to decide between the trainers. I was told that a heavier flywheel will give me a more realistic road feel.

    The CycleOps is $9 more than the Giant and I really just don't know which one to get. I'm just using it to get exercise over the winter, when the weather improves I'll likely be out on the bike most days.

    I'm probably going to pick it up on Friday / Saturday from my LBS. My only requirement is to have it quiet enough to hold a conversation or watch TV and hold up to being used a few times a week to stay in shape. Based on what I've been told this won't be a problem with either trainer.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by bradr View Post
    Its more of trying to decide between the trainers. I was told that a heavier flywheel will give me a more realistic road feel.

    The CycleOps is $9 more than the Giant and I really just don't know which one to get. I'm just using it to get exercise over the winter, when the weather improves I'll likely be out on the bike most days.

    I'm probably going to pick it up on Friday / Saturday from my LBS. My only requirement is to have it quiet enough to hold a conversation or watch TV and hold up to being used a few times a week to stay in shape. Based on what I've been told this won't be a problem with either trainer.
    As I mentioned previously, IME at low resistance a heavier flywheel would better simulate road riding, but if you plan on using the trainer for cardio fitness (which will require higher resistance), I don't think flywheel weight is worth fretting over because the resistance overcomes the momentum.

    Re: the noise level, I've never used those particular models, but generally speaking fluid trainers are quieter than mag's.

    Lastly, I think the remote for resistance control is a big plus, but as you say, both models have that feature. You might want to consider a HRM. IMO they're useful tools to gauge ride intensity, which can be regulated with the resistance control. Start out with a warmup, then gradually raise resistance/ intensity, then towards the end, gradually drop resistance for the cool down.

    EDIT: As an afterthought, some here would say that if simulating road riding is your goal, rollers would be a better choice. They do help riders hone their bike handling skills, but IMO most trainers have an edge on building cardio fitness, so maybe choose accordingly.
    Last edited by PJ352; 12-06-2011 at 10:00 PM. Reason: Addition..

  5. #5
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    As a follow-up to my previous posts, you might want to search for reviews on both trainers. I've included links to two, and while I generally take them with a grain of salt, they can give some insight into whether a product will suite your needs.

    Reviews:
    CYCLEOPS Mag+ (with Adjuster) Review Cycleops - TURBO TRAINER - Expert Advice on Turbo Trainers - Reviews

    Giant Cyclotron Mag II Trainer Review - BikeRadar

    One thing I don't care for on the Giant is the polyurethane roller, which (I think) will wear faster than alu rollers.

    Also, at this price point, lack of adequate resistance is a fairly common complaint, so depending on your intended use, you may want to consider a slightly higher priced model. Performance and Nashbar have decent selections, reasonable return policies and (generally) useful product reviews.

  6. #6
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    Regardless of fly wheel weight, no trainer is going to feel like the road.

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    Thanks for all the replies, I'll be heading into my LBS tomorrow to give it a go and hopefully pick one up.

    They'll let me actually try one out in the store with my bike on it before I buy it.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by bradr View Post
    Thanks for all the replies, I'll be heading into my LBS tomorrow to give it a go and hopefully pick one up.

    They'll let me actually try one out in the store with my bike on it before I buy it.
    ... and that's as it should be. Good luck!!

  9. #9
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    Well I've done it, I bought a trainer.

    I ended up going with the Giant Cyclotron which is a magnetic trainer with a remote resistance adjustment.

    The big reasons for going with it were price (saved about $30 over the Cycleops) and got an additional skewer for a second bike for the trainer. On top of all that, apparently the Giant may be compatible with my wife's bike (the CycleOps was not, we tried.) So in the end it was an easy decision.

    The shop set everything up, showed me how to hook everything up and got me running on a new trainer in the shop. On top of all that after un-boxing a new trainer and setting it up, they asked me to take a new one in the box to ensure that no parts go missing and to make sure that I'm not missing anything.

    I was excited and couldn't wait to try out my new toy so I un-boxed it at home, and went for a spin.

    Overall, I'm very happy with it. At a lower speeds (cadence around 70 rpm) in a high gear with high resistance the noise is pretty low. With a higher cadence (around 110) in a high gear the trainer does give off a pretty loud rumble. Not loud enough not to talk to my wife without yelling or hear the TV but definitely loud.

    To be honest, for my fitness level running the trainer at that speed is not maintainable for an extended period of time (read more than a minute or so), and for my current fitness there is enough resistance myself and the volume is quiet enough.

    We also have hardwood throughout, so I might try to put something under the trainer to see how it dampens the sound.

    All in all, I am happy with the trainer right now. It matches my current fitness level well and does the job it needs to (keep me fit over the winter.)

    Thanks again to everyone who posted, it helped me make my mind (and lighten my wallet.)

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by bradr View Post
    Well I've done it, I bought a trainer.
    Glad it worked out for you. Sounds like an above average bike shop.

    I'm not trying to further lighten your wallet, but two things you might want to consider are a fan (or two) and a mat or rug. The fans will help dissipate sweat (and improve comfort, IME) and the mat/ rug (or similar) will protect your floors from sweat. It'll also quell the trainer noise to some degree.

    Some members have posted a preference for watching TV/ cycling vids during their trainer rides. I prefer music, so YMMV.

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    I've already got a HRM (my bike computer has one.) I don't have any of that gel but after about 10 mins on the trainer I generate enough sweat that is starts to work.

    We also have fans already so that takes care of that. We have some low fans and some tall fans. I'll have to see what I prefer. You definitely sweat more though on a trainer, probably due to the fact that there is no air circulation or wind to assist.

    We have no carpet at all. I was thinking of just throwing down an old towel under the rear of the bike and one under the part that I ride on. Probably not as good as some spare carpet for sound deadening but should be good enough to pick up any dirt from the bike, sweat and what have you.

    I'm not sure about the fact that it makes the surface on the bottom of the trainer essentially more slick though, or if this would be a problem.

    For my first run I watched some TV and that seems to work. I thought about maybe trying out a video game, but found the bike not as comfortable to ride with no hands so just TV for me (at least for now.)

    Who would have thought that by riding a bike I might be able to watch some TV

    Tomorrow I will probably try to hook my wifes bike up to the trainer and see how it goes and how she likes it.

  12. #12
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    Using a HRM is (IMO/E) a big plus on a trainer. Together with your remote resistance control it'll help regulate intensity/ time in zones. Gel isn't needed. As you say, it doesn't take long for sweat to make a connection and that being a warmup phase, the readout isn't necessary.

    Towels should work ok. As for sweating, depending on the intensity of your workout, you may find that two fans beat one. I use a spare bedroom and (even at near zero temps) open a window and have a fan directed at me.

    Also, depending on the trainers proximity to walls, you may want to place cardboard between the rear tire and wall. Where I have my setup, I've had to clean dirt/ grit/ lube off the wall, so lesson learned.

  13. #13
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    Good to know that stuff gets thrown past the back of the bike as well. I don't have a wall directly behind me, but I don't want lube and stuff getting on our hardwood so I'll have to set some sort of blocker up there. Dirts not a big deal (it vacuums easily) but lube would be a pain.

    Thanks again!

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