Cycling shoes to get carbon soles or not?
Results 1 to 16 of 16
  1. #1
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    106

    Cycling shoes to get carbon soles or not?

    Just curious on the consensus of the shoes... should a beginner get carbon soles or just go for the cheaper shoes? For my specific case, I dont remember the modes but it was a specialized shoe and one had carbon soles and the other one didnt.. for a $50 upcharge... is it worth it?

  2. #2
    Cycling induced anoesis
    Reputation: PJ352's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    13,003
    Quote Originally Posted by AythanNyah09 View Post
    Just curious on the consensus of the shoes... should a beginner get carbon soles or just go for the cheaper shoes? For my specific case, I dont remember the modes but it was a specialized shoe and one had carbon soles and the other one didnt.. for a $50 upcharge... is it worth it?
    I don't know what models of Specialized shoes you were looking at, but in their road shoe lineup they don't even offer a partial CF sole until the Expert model. The Pro (and up) have full CF outsoles.

    That aside, whether new or experienced cyclist, shoes are one area I don't recommend skimping on. A well fitting, well designed shoe with stiff soles will help you get the most out of your pedal system in relative comfort - especially on longer rides.

  3. #3
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    106
    I remember the guy asking me if I want to go to "Pro" or for $50 less... go to Expert. So, the recommendation is always get the "better" shoe?

  4. #4
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: RJP Diver's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    2,508
    Quote Originally Posted by AythanNyah09 View Post
    So, the recommendation is always get the "better" shoe?
    No, the recommendation is "don't skimp on shoes" which is somewhat different than "always get the better shoe."

    Specialized Expert and Pro shoes are both fine. Plenty stiff for the average rider. I would say whichever closure system fits you better/more comfortably is the one to choose.

    If you "always got the better shoe" you'd be spending $300-$400 or more, since there's always "a better shoe" somewhere.
    "It ain't a teacup that the Queen gave you - it's a bike. Ride it!"

  5. #5
    Cycling induced anoesis
    Reputation: PJ352's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    13,003
    Quote Originally Posted by RJP Diver View Post
    No, the recommendation is "don't skimp on shoes" which is somewhat different than "always get the better shoe."

    Specialized Expert and Pro shoes are both fine. Plenty stiff for the average rider. I would say whichever closure system fits you better/more comfortably is the one to choose.

    If you "always got the better shoe" you'd be spending $300-$400 or more, since there's always "a better shoe" somewhere.
    Yup. And more expensive doesn't necessarily translate into a better fitting, well designed shoe with stiff soles.

    OP: FWIW I log ~6k miles annually and have a pair of 5 year old Elites where only the cleat mount area is CF (but the soles are stiff). IME they've been an excellent shoe.As long as Spec shoes fit you well, I think the Expert is more than adequate.

  6. #6
    have droids, will party
    Reputation: Guod's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    582
    Get the stiffest, best fitting shoe with a reliable closure system. I recently switched to an all velcro setup due to crappy ratchets. The previous shoes fit great, but the ratchets were always stripping out. I figure velcro will last a little longer before it no longer holds. If you can afford really nice shoes with all carbon this and that, then go for it. I'd say in the area of things that you actually strap to your body, get the best you can afford. It'll go a long way for comfort. As previous posters have pointed out though, actual cost does not always mean best. You might find a better fit with a different brand. Shop around.

  7. #7
    Cycling induced anoesis
    Reputation: PJ352's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    13,003
    Quote Originally Posted by Guod View Post
    Get the stiffest, best fitting shoe with a reliable closure system. I recently switched to an all velcro setup due to crappy ratchets.
    Velcro isn't the best solution because (with time) it does lose its grip, but IMO/E it's a decent compromise.

    My issue with ratchets is that I can't fine tune fit enough to avoid them from either adjusting too loose or pinching the tops of my feet. Given their popularity, I'm sure not everyone experiences this, but good point re: considering the closure system used.

  8. #8
    have droids, will party
    Reputation: Guod's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    582
    Quote Originally Posted by PJ352 View Post
    Velcro isn't the best solution because (with time) it does lose its grip, but IMO/E it's a decent compromise.

    My issue with ratchets is that I can't fine tune fit enough to avoid them from either adjusting too loose or pinching the tops of my feet. Given their popularity, I'm sure not everyone experiences this, but good point re: considering the closure system used.
    Yeah, I know it'll eventually wear out. The ratchets I had though, were wearing out very rapidly (few thousand miles of use). Velcro is really easy to adjust on the fly too.

    FWIW the all velcro shoe I went with is the Giro prolight. Really comfy and very light (as it should be).

  9. #9
    old school drop out
    Reputation: laffeaux's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Posts
    1,578
    Go with the more comfortable shoe. Specialized shoes fit me well and they're what I ride (road and mountain versions). However, the different levels of shoe (Expert, Pro, S-Works) fit differently and vary in comfort level. Try on the various different levels and buy the pair that fits your foot best.
    Last edited by laffeaux; 07-30-2012 at 09:54 AM.

  10. #10
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    2,597
    I never felt the difference with the carbon sole. I replaced them with cheaper shoes that fit me better.

    Get the shoe that fits best.
    With people like Peter P. around, I am done posting on this website. Mean people have driven me off after 9 plus years. Good luck newbies beware.

  11. #11
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    106
    I was curious because I did see the price difference on the specialiazed "comp/elite" and "pro" and also seeing that deal (in the hot deals forum) on the Sidi shoes. But either way... Im hearing... try everything out and make sure it fits well! Since i have an percentage off of the LBS (since I bought the bike from them) I can purchase the appropriate shoes there and then and maybe someday... look into Sidi. Otherwise, I think Im hearing that the full carbon soles is worth it... as long as they fit and feel good!

  12. #12
    Cycling induced anoesis
    Reputation: PJ352's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    13,003
    Quote Originally Posted by AythanNyah09 View Post
    ... I think Im hearing that the full carbon soles is worth it... as long as they fit and feel good!
    I think it's a 'package deal', so I'm gonna reiterate what I stated earlier...
    A well fitting, well designed shoe with stiff soles will help you get the most out of your pedal system in relative comfort - especially on longer rides.

    I think you need to differentiate 'comfort' trying shoes on in a store as opposed to 'comfort' while cycling. If you find a shoe with a comfortable fit that has a flexy sole, odds are you aren't going to remain comfortable for long while pedaling. The material make-up of the sole is secondary, but it has to be rigid.

  13. #13
    Resident Curmudgeon
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    11,974
    If all else is equal, I say get the carbon soles if you can afford it.
    Before you criticize someone walk a mile in their shoes. That way when you criticize them you'll be a mile away & you'll have their shoes.

  14. #14
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    20
    Quote Originally Posted by PJ352 View Post
    I think it's a 'package deal', so I'm gonna reiterate what I stated earlier...
    A well fitting, well designed shoe with stiff soles will help you get the most out of your pedal system in relative comfort - especially on longer rides.

    I think you need to differentiate 'comfort' trying shoes on in a store as opposed to 'comfort' while cycling. If you find a shoe with a comfortable fit that has a flexy sole, odds are you aren't going to remain comfortable for long while pedaling. The material make-up of the sole is secondary, but it has to be rigid.
    quote! importante!

  15. #15
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    133
    You don't need carbon soles. IMHO you get the most bang for your buck in the $125 - 150 range. For $100 more, there is a slight improvement in performance (which you may not notice).

  16. #16
    Fat and slow but trying
    Reputation: Nubster's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    963
    I got carbon soled shoes last week. Been riding with my Specialized non-carbon soled mountain bike shoes. I can say I tell a pretty big difference, for the better. I got my shoes (Lake) off Amazon for like $125 shipped with the BOA system, which I like very much so far.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT ROADBIKEREVIEW

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2019 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.