Diamondback bikes? - Page 2
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  1. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by JeffReigns View Post
    I did actually make some calls to a few shops that are a little farther from me...

    A few of them have Raleigh bikes, any info on these? I tried looking on RBR for reviews as well as elsewhere and I couldn't find much, which makes me a little weary about considering them. Anyway, just from chatting on the phone the one fellow was willing to give me a pretty good deal on some of them(Ravenio 1/2).
    Like I said in your other thread, I have a Raleigh Revenio 2. It hasn't disappointed me. In fact, after this morning's ride, I think I'm in love with this bike.

  2. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by TwntyOneTwlv View Post
    Like I said in your other thread, I have a Raleigh Revenio 2. It hasn't disappointed me. In fact, after this morning's ride, I think I'm in love with this bike.
    I'm glad to hear that! I wasn't originally going to make the trip to see this guy until after we got back from Baltimore, but I'm considering making it today just to check it out.

  3. #28
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    So, I went up to this guys shop today. Unfortunately I didn't get to try out the Ravenio 2 because the only size he had it in was 56cm. However I did get to ride the 1, and to be completely honest(and this is probably my inexperience talking) I didn't see how the 2300 wasn't 'smooth'.

    You have to understand, what I had in mind was my old(when I was like 8 years old) walmart mountain bike shifting. This is what I thought of when I was thinking of the 2300(not how it was done, obviously this bike has STI, but the unreliability of it).

    While I'm in Baltimore I'm gonna try to ride some stuff with Tiagra/105 on it just so I have something to compare it to... If I went with a Raleigh though, I'd definitely go for the 2.0 not only because of the Sora components, but also the carbon fork.

  4. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by JeffReigns View Post
    So, I went up to this guys shop today. Unfortunately I didn't get to try out the Ravenio 2 because the only size he had it in was 56cm. However I did get to ride the 1, and to be completely honest(and this is probably my inexperience talking) I didn't see how the 2300 wasn't 'smooth'.

    You have to understand, what I had in mind was my old(when I was like 8 years old) walmart mountain bike shifting. This is what I thought of when I was thinking of the 2300(not how it was done, obviously this bike has STI, but the unreliability of it).

    While I'm in Baltimore I'm gonna try to ride some stuff with Tiagra/105 on it just so I have something to compare it to... If I went with a Raleigh though, I'd definitely go for the 2.0 not only because of the Sora components, but also the carbon fork.
    IMO/E there's no question that our cycling background/ experiences color our attitudes re: current offerings, so I'm not surprised that you were happy with the 2300's performance.

    FWIW, the geometry on the Revenio 2.0 is the same as the 1.0, so fit and handling will be the same, but given the differences in specs, I agree that (budget allowing) it's worth a look.

  5. #30
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    The guy is giving me a stellar deal on either one, however I'm almost certain I'll go with the 2.0 not only because of the Sora, but mainly because of the carbon fork. He even gave me a good price on the 3.0 which has 105, but its still a good ways outside my budget.

  6. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by JeffReigns View Post
    The guy is giving me a stellar deal on either one, however I'm almost certain I'll go with the 2.0 not only because of the Sora, but mainly because of the carbon fork. He even gave me a good price on the 3.0 which has 105, but its still a good ways outside my budget.
    IMO, as long as it fits well and you like the ride/ handling, I think the 2.0 is a good compromise for you and see no reason to stray from your budget. Use this bike to build fitness, give yourself some time to sort out your likes/ dislikes with an eye towards the future and that 'next bike'.

    And don't let anyone tell you different. Stick with this and there will be a 'next' bike.

    EDIT: Just as a FYI, if you're considering upgrading to the 2.0 primarily because of the fork, you may want to know that both models use a chromoly (steel) steerer tube, but the 2.0 upgrades to CF blades. The result might be slightly lower weight, but you may never feel the difference out on the road.
    Last edited by PJ352; 04-04-2012 at 07:40 PM. Reason: addition..

  7. #32
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    My first bike even with Tiagra shifted superbly as long as I kept it in tune. The only difference I notice with the Ultegra I have now is that is shifts crisper under power, which is something you only need if your racing(or have plenty of money).

    I just recently got a professional fitting for the first time in 4 years of riding and at $100 it was money that couldn't have been spent better anywhere on my bike. Anyone who tells you it won't make a difference is sadly mistaken, I wasn't much faster afterwards but I sure as hell felt good doing it. It also keeps you from buying 4 different stems to see which one you like better...
    "If you cant fix it with a hammer, you got yourself an electrical problem"

  8. #33
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    Just my opinion but I never cared for my Sora shifting. Ironically now that it is a winter/rain bike it has started working ok. Still would prefer anything Sram but not a deal breaker.

  9. #34
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    Yeah I wouldn't mind having something higher end but unless I catch someone asleep I doubt its gonna happen. I'm in the Baltimore area now so hopefully I can check out some of these shops in the next few days

  10. #35
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    Thumbs up I bought this bike, I love it

    Quote Originally Posted by PlatyPius View Post
    Yes you can.



    And both of those bikes are lower-end than the Podium 2.




    Maybe you don't mean to, but you do. This is some of the most judgmental, elitist crap I've read on the board in a long time.
    I totally agree, I actually just bought this exact bike for the same price. I'm a newbie rider, and new to the forum, so not sure how much weight my opinion carries. But I absolutlely love this bike. Bought it through fatwallet, so got another 4% off too. I am pretty mechanical, so I was not worried about setting it up, or tuning and fitting it. I couldn't buy a bike of this caliber with full tiagra for much less than $1000 around here. So I say buy the bike, and use the extra cash for a better seat, shoes, pedals, shorts, or whatever. That's what I did, and I don't regret a thing.

    I've owned the bike since March 15, and have put almost 200 miles on it already, had one flat, but otherwise it has worked flawless.

  11. #36
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    Im still slightly considering the diamondback however im really enjoying riding different bikes. I got to take a fuji robeaux 3 out for a mile today. Mental note: just beacuse i ran before doesnt mean im in cycling shape.

  12. #37
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    I'm going to likely buying the Podium 2 from Jamis, LBS in Corona for $599.00 If you look at the bike, regardless of price it's a nice enthusiast bike! He'll, my brother rode a $350.00 bike across country 20 years ago with what was at the time an entry level road bike! The Podium 2 stacks up against bikes in the $900.00 to $1,200 price range. My opinion is this is a $1,000 bike for $599.00 bucks! Really you can't go wrong with this bike, as if one hates it they can sell it, and take less of a bath than if one were to buy a 2012 carbon bike! Many people are happy with this kind of bike, and it can deliver years of enjoyment. If a bike is reliable and relatively comfortable it's a good choice. One can always upgrade if needed! A good wine is a wine you enjoy regardless of price! A good bike is falls into the same realm if you ask me. I'm a great tennis player, and I can enjoy the game with an old wood tennis racket! I think I made my point!

  13. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hottody View Post
    I'm going to likely buying the Podium 2 from Jamis, LBS in Corona for $599.00 If you look at the bike, regardless of price it's a nice enthusiast bike! He'll, my brother rode a $350.00 bike across country 20 years ago with what was at the time an entry level road bike! The Podium 2 stacks up against bikes in the $900.00 to $1,200 price range. My opinion is this is a $1,000 bike for $599.00 bucks! Really you can't go wrong with this bike, as if one hates it they can sell it, and take less of a bath than if one were to buy a 2012 carbon bike! Many people are happy with this kind of bike, and it can deliver years of enjoyment. If a bike is reliable and relatively comfortable it's a good choice. One can always upgrade if needed! A good wine is a wine you enjoy regardless of price! A good bike is falls into the same realm if you ask me. I'm a great tennis player, and I can enjoy the game with an old wood tennis racket! I think I made my point!
    I agree 100%, the only thing I didn't like about the bike was the seat. I replaced mine with a Fizik, and have never looked back. Buy it, you won't be disappointed. And if you want to upgrade in a couple years, you'll be able to sell it for almost as much as you have invested.

  14. #39
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    My first bike was a 2010 Podium One. It was nothing to write home about, but it was equally a perfectly usable bike. I never had any problems with the shifting. It was "heavy" by today's standards, but it was that much over 22lbs, which is not bad at the price.

  15. #40
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    SouthPaw57 I'm wondering why you chose Fizik? Did you hear good reviews? Google search, comfortable seats? Just curious?
    Also which model fzik did you choose?
    fi'zi:k | Kurve | A Dynamic Interface | Road Saddle

  16. #41
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    Hey Hottody, I did a lot of research, and was recommended the fizik arione by JensonUSA, and another shop, but I weigh a little more than average at 195the lbs, so I found a good deal on the alliante, and figured id give it a try. I thinkcan its geareda towards bigger riders. I may have gotten lucky, but the seat fits me well, and is a huge improvement over the stock seat. I can ride 30 miles and barely think about it. The Fizik actually flexes like a saddle should, not stiff as a board like the stock one.

  17. #42
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    Thank you Southpaw57! I should be getting my Diamondback Podium 2 this weekend from Jenson! Thank you for the great tip, I two am about 6'2 230 lbs. Nice to know about the seat. Thank you!!!!

  18. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by PlatyPius View Post
    Yes you can.



    And both of those bikes are lower-end than the Podium 2.




    Maybe you don't mean to, but you do. This is some of the most judgmental, elitist crap I've read on the board in a long time.
    Platy nailed it. Self important folks who don't think you can ride on a budget are generally out of touch. Whether Sora or Tiagra, it's all over the road with many happy pedalers, can be bombproof with even basic care, and can get those first 2-3 seasons under your belt while still retaining some resale value. The reminders on fit are good.
    JESUS IS COMING

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  19. #44
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    JayTee...I must say that you make a really valid argument. I'm looking at getting into road biking, but the last year has been difficult from a finical standpoint. That being said, I pride myself on making educated / informed decisions. I drive a 2003 Saab, but it looks good and it's paid for! my wife drives a 2002, reliable, clean, functional car, but it's paid for. I'm 46 years old and have downsized my home from a 3,800 sq foot home in a gated community to a smaller much less expensive home! On the surface, it does not look so good, but my new smaller home in a perfectly good neiborhood was paid for cash!

    Now, I have been researching road bikes and feel that I have a good understanding of my dream bike and more practical solutions. The Diamondback Podium with Tiagra at $599.00 is a great bargain and a bike that should work just fine! My point is really that one can enjoy nice things without spending top dallar to have the best! Now, that being said, if I really felt I wanted, needed a higher end bike and was within my budget, I would have no hesitation buying it! But truth be told, I feel the Diamondback Podium 2 will be a very nice, capable first road bike that works for my conservative budget. Also...the bike will be paid for, and I will not be financing another toy that sometimes merely adds unessarry debt and stress to ones life.

  20. #45
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    Just thought I'd chime-in here, as I'm also a noob who is a "budget cyclist"!

    Bought my bike online (after using a good online fitment calculator)....it fits like a glove....wasn't crazy about the Sora shifters at first- but I was new to STI- now that I'm used to them, and give a little attention to keeping the front derailleur in good adjustment, -they're fine. I'm now riding 50 miles a week on very hilly terrain...and have less than $600 invested in the bike and all accessories!

    .....and I'm having a ball- zero complaints! I look forward to getting out there on the road 4 or 5 times a week!

    And I don't mean to discount what some other very experienced forum members say...but ya have to remember that most LBS's/salesmen's primary objective is to make money/move what they already have in stock, etc. Unless you know otherwise, you can't trust them for good advice.....(Many won't even give you a competent fitting!).....so coming here is the best source of advice- even when there are conflicting opinions, you can ferret-out what will work best for you.

    That Diamondback sounds like a good deal in my book!

  21. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by SolitaryRider View Post
    Just thought I'd chime-in here, as I'm also a noob who is a "budget cyclist"!

    Bought my bike online (after using a good online fitment calculator)....it fits like a glove....wasn't crazy about the Sora shifters at first- but I was new to STI- now that I'm used to them, and give a little attention to keeping the front derailleur in good adjustment, -they're fine. I'm now riding 50 miles a week on very hilly terrain...and have less than $600 invested in the bike and all accessories!

    .....and I'm having a ball- zero complaints! I look forward to getting out there on the road 4 or 5 times a week!

    And I don't mean to discount what some other very experienced forum members say...but ya have to remember that most LBS's/salesmen's primary objective is to make money/move what they already have in stock, etc. Unless you know otherwise, you can't trust them for good advice.....(Many won't even give you a competent fitting!).....so coming here is the best source of advice- even when there are conflicting opinions, you can ferret-out what will work best for you.

    That Diamondback sounds like a good deal in my book!
    For balance, I'll offer my thoughts/ experiences on the bold statements.

    Re: 'good' online fit calculators, IMO that's an oxymoron. The best they'll do is provide the user with a range of fit parameters based only on values inputted. No allowance for a riders fitness level, flexibility, anatomical issues, cycling experiences (among other relevant factors). IME, a knowledgeable fitter can do better working one on one with a rider for ~20 minutes, because they'll see the rider on the bike, in both static and dynamic positions.

    Re: the fits like a glove comment, I'd ask what you're using as a baseline for comparison. What similar bikes have you ridden in your adult life. If none, and the bike fits and feels good to ride, that's fine, but at least qualify your remarks to avoid misleading anyone. Also, others experiences may not mirror yours, and they'll need to tap their LBS for support (at an added cost), which offsets the online 'savings'.

    Re: shops motive to make money and move stock, that's a given. But that doesn't mean that most don't do right by their customers. IME, most do, because they can sell 'that other bike' to another customer who's better suited to it. So yes, most can be trusted to provide good advice.

    Re: a shops ability to size/ fit riders, for certain, that varies. But as you say, this (and similar) forums can help guide a noob to the better shops. And FWIW, most are far better than the assistance you'll get from online retailers, who (coincidentally) also want to make money and move stock.

  22. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by PJ352 View Post

    Re: 'good' online fit calculators, IMO that's an oxymoron. The best they'll do is provide the user with a range of fit parameters based only on values inputted. No allowance for a riders fitness level, flexibility, anatomical issues, cycling experiences (among other relevant factors). IME, a knowledgeable fitter can do better working one on one with a rider for ~20 minutes, because they'll see the rider on the bike, in both static and dynamic positions. .
    Good point. But that assumes that the shop one is dealing with is quite competent. I've been in shops where they determine one's bike size by inseam/standover height.... [Didn't know any better at the time, myself...but for some reason that always stuck in my memory].

    Quote Originally Posted by PJ352 View Post
    Re: the fits like a glove comment, I'd ask what you're using as a baseline for comparison. What similar bikes have you ridden in your adult life. If none, and the bike fits and feels good to ride, that's fine, but at least qualify your remarks to avoid misleading anyone. Also, others experiences may not mirror yours, and they'll need to tap their LBS for support (at an added cost), which offsets the online 'savings'..
    Also a good point. I'm just going by the fract that a)I'm very comfortable; and b)I have no pain or other issues. The reach on my bike is a bit more than optimal, IMO- but it doesn't seem to be detrimental in any way....and had I gotten the next smallest size (4cm's smaller) the bike would be too small; If I go with a significantly shorter stem....it would likely severely affect the handling of the bike. My point being: You can't always have "perfection" anyways...nor do most non-pro riders need perfection. I believe if you get a bike that's "in the ballpark", fit-wise, you can make any necessary tweaks and adjustments that are needed, and be just fine. Maybe not if you're doing the Tour De France....but for the Tour De Neighborhood.....

    Quote Originally Posted by PJ352 View Post
    Re: shops motive to make money and move stock, that's a given. But that doesn't mean that most don't do right by their customers. IME, most do, because they can sell 'that other bike' to another customer who's better suited to it. So yes, most can be trusted to provide good advice..
    It depends. Some are incompetent (I'd imagine the pool of experienced, knowledgeable potential employees is quite small in that field...and that many shops just have to hire non-bike people off the street...); Some just don't care; some just want to make a sale...any sale...and then of course, there are good ones- but a noob really has no way of knowing who's who.

    Quote Originally Posted by PJ352 View Post
    Re: a shops ability to size/ fit riders, for certain, that varies. But as you say, this (and similar) forums can help guide a noob to the better shops. And FWIW, most are far better than the assistance you'll get from online retailers, who (coincidentally) also want to make money and move stock.
    What assistance from online retailers? I think it's pretty much a given, that online is a do-it-yourself propasition. Make people aware of the option- some will naturally want the service that an LBS offers...while some of us are do-it-yourselfers by nature, or don't even have an LBS within a reasonable distance (I fall into both of those categories).

    I think we can both agree that online purchases can work successfully for a good percentage of people...and that some would do better with the assistance of a good LBS.

    Sure...if we buy online, we can't test-ride....but that is mitigated by the fact that if we are a noob, we will likely be happy with anything that isn't too radical, and will pretty much acclimate to whatever we get and be happy with it...and if an experienced cyclist, then we will likely knoiw what to expect from certain geometry/frame material/components, eh?

    I'm not trying to discount what you say- as I'm the one who comes to you for advice, and have learned a LOT from your posts....it's just that there are options that do work for a lot of people- so the way I see it, I'd like to present people with the facts, and then let them choose the course of action that they are comfortable with.

    The things you say are certainly valid- but you also have consider some of us would never have gotten into cycling if we were forced to go the LBS route- I mean, if I had had to do that, I wouldn't have been able to get a decent bike and accessories for much under $1000- and I wasn't willing to spend that much, not knowing if I'd like riding as an adult, or if it was even viable on the roads where I live.

    And when it's time to upgrade, I want as much bike as I can get for the money. I could go to an LBS and still be stuck in the entry-level category...or I could buy online and get the twice the bike for the same money.

  23. #48
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    Sorry to hijack, but why does everyone say you need all this gear as NJ said? Helmet, shorts, gloves, preferably a jersey or two. Saddlebag, spare tube, CO2 inflator, bike tool?

    Im not new to bikes,(tho new to road bike) ive been in BMX since about 2000, and since then have put a probably an unhealthy amount of miles on a bike with basicly no seat wile rideing from spot to spot but I have never had any of that gear on a ride. I understand that a road bike has a lot less tire and punctures may happen more, but why do you NEED a Helmet, shorts, gloves, jersey or two. saddlebag and so forth?

  24. #49
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    Xj bmx, I suppose you do not "need" all the gear, although a helmet is required by law here in California, and I believe makes good sense! As far as shorts, a good pair with padding makes for a much for comfortable ride! The Spare tube and inflator / pump is not required, but highly recommended, because one will eventually get a flat, ( it's only a matter of time) and it's simply a smart thing to have! The Jersey of course it not needed but something that might just help put one into the cycling mood! My advise is buy what you can afford and accessorize as desired!

  25. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hottody View Post
    Xj bmx, I suppose you do not "need" all the gear, although a helmet is required by law here in California, and I believe makes good sense! As far as shorts, a good pair with padding makes for a much for comfortable ride! The Spare tube and inflator / pump is not required, but highly recommended, because one will eventually get a flat, ( it's only a matter of time) and it's simply a smart thing to have! The Jersey of course it not needed but something that might just help put one into the cycling mood! My advise is buy what you can afford and accessorize as desired!
    That sounds alot better than, the way Ive been reading it around here. Like I said, I understand a pump and tire patch kit since the distance from your house/car is alot further than it is on my bmx, and I sure know it happens, Ive blow many tires, (tho usually from landing short from a stair set gap, or not hopping high enough juping on top of somthing) but the rest that Ive been reading seems not so nessary as alot of people make it seem around here.

    The padded shorts sounds like a good deal tho haha.

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