Entry level rider.
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    Entry level rider.

    Hey all. I'm new to the forum. My plan is to get into riding. Nothing too serious, mainly for cardio reasons, but would like to build for some longer rides occasionally. I'm looking at a used Cannondale Ironman 56cm 800 CAAD 5 Men's Triathlon bike with Cateye computer. Like new condition. Recently tuned up with new brakes and tires. Guy wants $550 for it. Is it worth that? Thanks in advance

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    Is 56cm the right size for you?

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    Yes. I was measured on Friday. I've been reading and found that I may need a road bike more so than a Tri bike since I will be riding in hilly areas. Also found a Trek 1.2 for $550 with some Shamano upgraded components and Fsa rd200 wheels.

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    Quote Originally Posted by JBeezy View Post
    Yes. I was measured on Friday. I've been reading and found that I may need a road bike more so than a Tri bike since I will be riding in hilly areas. Also found a Trek 1.2 for $550 with some Shamano upgraded components and Fsa rd200 wheels.
    That's not a bad deal if it fits you well..

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    Quote Originally Posted by JBeezy View Post
    Yes. I was measured on Friday. I've been reading and found that I may need a road bike more so than a Tri bike since I will be riding in hilly areas. Also found a Trek 1.2 for $550 with some Shamano upgraded components and Fsa rd200 wheels.
    Hilly areas or not, Tri/ TT bikes are only good choices for those partaking in those events. Your OP doesn't indicate an interest in either, so a road bike is the clear choice.

    Be careful of being "measured". If you mean someone put you on a 56CM and told you it was your size, they're missing the fundamental that there are no standards for determining frame size, so brand A's 56 may be brand B's 54, or 58. Better to determine your reach and drop requirements and find a bike close to those numbers.

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    I went to my local bike shop and he measured me and talk size in comparison to me purchasing a Trek. He said between a 56-58 I'd be good. I'm approx 5'11" with a 32" inseam, 228 lbs. I'm leaning more towards the trek I mentioned above.

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    Quote Originally Posted by JBeezy View Post
    I went to my local bike shop and he measured me and talk size in comparison to me purchasing a Trek. He said between a 56-58 I'd be good. I'm approx 5'11" with a 32" inseam, 228 lbs. I'm leaning more towards the trek I mentioned above.
    Gotcha. Trek models can vary in sizing as well, but as long as you stay with the same geo, that's a good baseline to use.

    I suggest asking the seller to bring the bike to that LBS and have it assessed mechanically and for sizing. Since used bike prices vary by region, they may be able to ballpark street value as well.

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    Quote Originally Posted by PJ352 View Post
    Gotcha. Trek models can vary in sizing as well, but as long as you stay with the same geo, that's a good baseline to use.

    I suggest asking the seller to bring the bike to that LBS and have it assessed mechanically and for sizing. Since used bike prices vary by region, they may be able to ballpark street value as well.
    He is getting new wheels installed This coming weekend and I plan on meeting him. The seller says the bike has been tuned up and ready to roll. What are some of things I need to look for? I'm guessing I need to ride it and shift thru the gears

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    Quote Originally Posted by JBeezy View Post
    He is getting new wheels installed This coming weekend and I plan on meeting him. The seller says the bike has been tuned up and ready to roll. What are some of things I need to look for? I'm guessing I need to ride it and shift thru the gears.
    Things to check for are:

    - headset (the bars can be turned left/ right with no binding or play)
    - crankset (rotates with no binding/ play or noise)
    - wheel hubs (rotate smoothly w/ no binding/ play)
    - rims - spin to check that they're relatively true
    - tires - cracks evident? (if they're original, I'd count on replacing them, along w/ tubes and rim strips).

    During your test ride, check for fit (are you comfortable, stretched out, cramped?). Check for functional braking/ shifting, steering and note any noises.

    Problems in one or more of these areas aren't necessarily deal breakers, but do indicate that some service will be required - meaning more financial outlay for you, post-purchase. Consider that when making an offer.

    If you think the bike fits and you're interested in it, I would recommend asking the seller to bring it to a reputable LBS to be assessed for mechanical condition as well as fit. While there, you could also ask them for a ballpark estimate of the bikes value.

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    Chain should be measured and teeth on the chainrings and cassette cogs as well as the chain itself assessed for economic life. I got a Madone 4.5 really cheap for my wife knowing it needed chainrings, cassette, chain, saddle, re-tape and all new cables. This all done at the LBS could make a bike a non starter value wise.

    I am glad someone unknowing of how to assess the state of usable serviceability did not pay his asking price is all I can say.
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    Everything you read that I post is just '1' guy's opinion, try to sort it all out best you can. ;) I will try to add value in my posts, if I miss the mark please let me know using a little decorum.

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    Thanks guys for your replys. I will keep all of these things in mind. I'm very excited about getting in the sport.

    Does shoes and pedals have to be expensive? What's the best bang for the buck? How about padded shorts or seats? He said he's keeping the pedals because they match his shoes.

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    Quote Originally Posted by JBeezy View Post
    Thanks guys for your replys. I will keep all of these things in mind. I'm very excited about getting in the sport.

    Does shoes and pedals have to be expensive? What's the best bang for the buck? How about padded shorts or seats? He said he's keeping the pedals because they match his shoes.
    Don't feel compelled to go clipless from the get-go. Eventually, once you get acclimated to the bike and road riding, then yes, but clips and straps or even platforms will be ok for awhile.

    To answer your question, 'expensive' is a relative term. What you want to look for is a shoe/ pedal combo that suites your purposes and style of riding.

    Any amount of walking would (IMO) dictate a shoe with a recessed cleat, but no matter what type you choose, you want a well designed footbed and stiff sole, so don't cheap out on shoes. Pedals are relatively inexpensive.

    Talk to your LBS about some options, and buy your shoes there, not online. You want to try before you buy.

    You'll want padded shorts, but not a padded seat. Keep the one that comes with the bike for a bit, and keep in mind that your position on a bike dictates comfort, so opt for a standard fitting - maybe ~$50.

    I'll reiterate that you should bring any bike under consideration to your LBS for sizing/ mechanical assessment. There may be a nominal charge for this, but it'll be cheaper than making a mistake buying a trouble-prone or ill fitting bike.

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    What I may do is go to Atlanta Saturday where is he having the wheels put on and have the guy check it out there. If all is good, then I'll really consider buying. Thanks again

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    Quote Originally Posted by JBeezy View Post
    What I may do is go to Atlanta Saturday where is he having the wheels put on and have the guy check it out there. If all is good, then I'll really consider buying. Thanks again
    Sounds like a (good) plan. Let us know how it goes...

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    Quote Originally Posted by JBeezy View Post
    What I may do is go to Atlanta Saturday where is he having the wheels put on and have the guy check it out there. If all is good, then I'll really consider buying. Thanks again
    Why new wheels? That doesn't make sense? You know, you can get a new 1.2 for not much more than that. And maybe get a discount on bibs, shoes, and your accessories... It might come out close to the same and you have a new bike. That option would let you shop around.... I have a Cannondale CAAD 8 that's similar to that Trek and I love that bike. It sounds like you got a decent vibe from the LBS that measured you? Talk to them about a bike?
    To date, philosophers have merely interpreted the world in various ways. The point however is to change it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by JBeezy View Post
    Does shoes and pedals have to be expensive? What's the best bang for the buck? How about padded shorts or seats?
    The best bang for your buck if you're starting out, and I hate to say it because it shuts out LBS purchases, is very good condition slightly used stuff on ebay OR discount store like backcountry.com. The ebay way is you buy it you keep it, but with backcountry you can ship back the stuff on sale that doesn't fit out of the box.

    I started with Shimano R087 shoes (now R088?), the model number isn't really important, but a shoe in that price range ($90-110) has served me well for a year or two and then I got upgrade fever. PJ is right, you can't walk in these things for any appreciable distance it's like wearing wooden clogs.

    Soft, padded, sofa like soggy seats end up putting pressure on your soft tissue. This is something people often get wrong at the expense of comfort: Attachment 308392

    I'm similar to your proportions at 6' and just under that weight and I've had luck with Hincapie bibs which I find cut generously (aka american sizing). Keep in mind bibs that are too loose will chafe under the motion of 1,000's of pedal strokes so make sure your clothing is tight. You won't be penalized for a loose shirt up top if you're not comfortable going full sausage just yet.

    One nod toward buying from an LBS: free maintenance. If you need gears adjusted....that's $30 in my NYC area... and probably $20 in yours. Anything on the bike will cost money to adjust, fix, move, touch, look at. This can add up quickly! Consider that you may spend $100+ in maintenance.

    If the spread is $200 or so, I would definitely go with a new bike from the LBS. Newer shifters, newer components, free support/advice, etc..

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    Quote Originally Posted by PBL450 View Post
    Why new wheels? That doesn't make sense?
    Oftentimes, sellers prep used bikes by building them with spare parts (called 'upgrades'). Doesn't necessarily mean they're bad deals, but points up the need for LBS's to assess them.

    Quote Originally Posted by 9W9W
    If the spread is $200 or so, I would definitely go with a new bike from the LBS. Newer shifters, newer components, free support/advice, etc..
    Absolutely....

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    I started on a Trek 1.2. A 2009 model I purchased in 2010. Paid $700 for it. Still have it for my backup bike. The sizes do vary a lot. I am 6'-0" and was sized out by one guy on a 56 which they did not have in stock. He sent me to another one of their stores across town and the guy there sized me on a 58. Which I bought. It had 175mm cranks and 44 cm handle bars. I rode it for three years. I had to tinker with it a lot to get comfortable, but I was a beginner and just assumed that was part of the deal. 2 years ago, I upgraded to a Bianchi Infinito. When I was sized for that one I ended up on a 55 with 172.5mm cranks and 42 mm bars. Different dealer in another town. It fits me a whole lot better and is a lot more comfortable to ride for long distances. When you put the two bikes side by side the Bianchi is definitely slightly smaller. As for shoes, I rode almost a whole year with platform pedals before I decided to switch to clipless pedals. They take a little time to get used to. I recommend platforms for beginners until they get used to riding.

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    Well he said he bent a wheel this weekend after we talked and worked out a deal at his local store on a new set. He's selling to buy a Tri bike.

    I talked with my LBS and they quoted me a 1.2 for $998 out the door. Then I thought it would be better to buy a good used bike for 1/2 the cost.

    Not looking forward to wearing the tight bottoms, but I could put a set of shorts over them I suppose.

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    Quote Originally Posted by PJ352 View Post
    Oftentimes, sellers prep used bikes by building them with spare parts (called 'upgrades'). Doesn't necessarily mean they're bad deals, but points up the need for LBS's to assess them.


    Absolutely....
    Oh! Thanks PJ, it's a reseller kind of thing, not buying someone's bike... I bought bikes off CL from some dude that wasn't using them... I see folks doing this, the reseller thing, on CL all the time. And ABSOLUTELY raises greater need to have it LBS checked out! Great point!
    To date, philosophers have merely interpreted the world in various ways. The point however is to change it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by JBeezy View Post
    Well he said he bent a wheel this weekend after we talked and worked out a deal at his local store on a new set. He's selling to buy a Tri bike.

    I talked with my LBS and they quoted me a 1.2 for $998 out the door. Then I thought it would be better to buy a good used bike for 1/2 the cost.

    Not looking forward to wearing the tight bottoms, but I could put a set of shorts over them I suppose.
    I'm sorry to say this... But he bent a wheel? For 1K you get a perfect bike you can ride and ride until you get the bug. I'm no expert, but a bent wheel is a crash most likely? This is worrisome.

    I started riding a year and a half ago and went clipless from the get. It's a learning curve, nothing wrong with platforms, but you get it pretty quick. You just have to pay attention to it. Start-up cost is pretty frightening in cycling, I know, but it doesn't stay that way.
    To date, philosophers have merely interpreted the world in various ways. The point however is to change it.

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    What are platform shoes that I keep seeing mentioned?

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    Quote Originally Posted by PBL450 View Post
    I'm sorry to say this... But he bent a wheel? For 1K you get a perfect bike you can ride and ride until you get the bug. I'm no expert, but a bent wheel is a crash most likely? This is worrisome.
    I agree.

    OP, ask questions about how the wheel got damaged... and is there any other requisite damage (frame? fork?).

    Definitely have this bike checked over before committing to the purchase.

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    Quote Originally Posted by JBeezy View Post
    What are platform shoes that I keep seeing mentioned?
    Platform pedals, not shoes. They're just flat pedals. You can wear sneakers or (preferably) most any footwear with a semi-rigid sole.

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    Quote Originally Posted by PJ352 View Post
    I agree.

    OP, ask questions about how the wheel got damaged... and is there any other requisite damage (frame? fork?).

    Definitely have this bike checked over before committing to the purchase.
    Wheels are pretty tough OP. I can think of ways that it could be bent without other damage... But the number of scenarios is dwarfed by the number of scenarios with additional damage. Bent wheel and selling the bike? No way. And stay away from a tri bike if you want to road bike. The handling is very different. Shop around some, it will be fun. But buying close to home will make having a relationship with your LBS convenient over time.
    To date, philosophers have merely interpreted the world in various ways. The point however is to change it.

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