Help getting pedals off
Results 1 to 18 of 18
  1. #1
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    4

    Help getting pedals off

    Just bought a set of Crank Bros. Candy pedals to replace my old cage pedals. However , the old pedals don't want to come off and I'm not sure which direction I should be turning the allen wrench (6 mm). Any suggestions for making this easier? Please help a Noob!

  2. #2
    Adorable Furry Hombre
    Reputation: Marc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    28,584
    Quote Originally Posted by SirBubb
    Just bought a set of Crank Bros. Candy pedals to replace my old cage pedals. However , the old pedals don't want to come off and I'm not sure which direction I should be turning the allen wrench (6 mm). Any suggestions for making this easier? Please help a Noob!
    HINT (yea my sarcasm is a bit high tonight)--right tool for the job...;)

    get a pedal wrench-it'll make the job far easier, and alot less hassle: your 6mm allen doesn't have enough lever arm for the job-you could get by with a cheater bar-but it's easier just to get the right tool.

    IIRC-driveside is normal threading, nondrive is reverse

    HTH-YMMV &etc.
    "Refreshingly Unconcerned With The Vulgar Exigencies Of Veracity "

  3. #3
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: coldplay's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    82
    If you don't have a pedal wrench you can use a boxed end or adjustable crescent wrench. The right pedal has "regular" threads (righty tighty, lefty loosey), so turn it counter clockwise (left) to loosen. The left pedal has "reversed" threads so you must turn it to the RIGHT to loosen it.
    Hope this helps.

  4. #4
    Arrogant roadie.....
    Reputation: Dave_Stohler's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    4,232
    Warning about crescent wrenches-many have heads wider than the flats on the spindle. Use the right size or buy the correct tool!

    BTW, I once used 3 cone wrenches stacked together to remove pedals. It worked OK. You'll never get them out using a 6mm allen key....
    We are the 801
    We are the central shaft

  5. #5
    Adorable Furry Hombre
    Reputation: Marc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    28,584
    Quote Originally Posted by Dave_Stohler
    Warning about crescent wrenches-many have heads wider than the flats on the spindle. Use the right size or buy the correct tool!
    [email protected] you dave-I was just thinking the same thing ;)
    "Refreshingly Unconcerned With The Vulgar Exigencies Of Veracity "

  6. #6

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    773
    take it to your lbs.


    next time, grease your threads if you want things to come unbolted in the future.

  7. #7
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: coldplay's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    82
    Good point about the crescent wrench... and after looking at my post again I meant Open end wrench, not Boxed end. Scary that I used to be a Jet Engine Mechanic Huh! Could you see some poor guy trying to fit a 9/16 boxed end wrench over one of the pedals???

  8. #8
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    2,009
    Quote Originally Posted by wzq622
    take it to your lbs.


    next time, grease your threads if you want things to come unbolted in the future.

    I don't use grease, lots of problems, get's old, dries out, attracts dirt, breaks down, hardens as it ages, heat melts it, cold makes it thicken up to feel like sludge, gets contaiminated too easily, and other problems. You can't depend upon it.

    I use a graphite compound you can find in plumbing supply stores called Never Seize. It's some what thick or pasty, you put it on with a flux brush. You don't need much at all. I've been using it for 30 years for my car, lawn equipment, lots of stuff.

  9. #9

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    773
    Quote Originally Posted by lawrence
    I don't use grease, lots of problems, get's old, dries out, attracts dirt, breaks down, hardens as it ages, heat melts it, cold makes it thicken up to feel like sludge, gets contaiminated too easily, and other problems. You can't depend upon it.

    I use a graphite compound you can find in plumbing supply stores called Never Seize. It's some what thick or pasty, you put it on with a flux brush. You don't need much at all. I've been using it for 30 years for my car, lawn equipment, lots of stuff.


    whatever works...

    ...but i'd go to your lbs and ask the mechs what they use and why.

  10. #10
    Arrogant roadie.....
    Reputation: Dave_Stohler's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    4,232
    OK, just to clear up some inaccurate info given by these 'newbie-savants', you will need most likely a 15mm wrench, not a 9/16". Also, the stuff is called "anti-sieze" compound, made by permatex.

    Ain't the internet great? Ask a technical question and all sorts of people will give you bad, dumb, or incomplete answers!!
    We are the 801
    We are the central shaft

  11. #11
    wim
    wim is offline
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    11,460

    Amusing.

    OK, just to clear up some inaccurate info given by these 'newbie-savants', you will need most likely a 15mm wrench, not a 9/16". Also, the stuff is called "anti-sieze" compound, made by permatex.

    Ain't the internet great? Ask a technical question and all sorts of people will give you bad, dumb, or incomplete answers!!
    "The stuff" I (and probably lawrence) use is in fact called "Anti-Seez" and is not made by Permatex. Works pretty well.

    Ain't the internet great? You get people clearing up inaccuracies who can't spell "seize."

  12. #12
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: bikejr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    360
    Quote Originally Posted by wim
    "The stuff" I (and probably lawrence) use is in fact called "Anti-Seez" and is not made by Permatex. Works pretty well.

    Ain't the internet great? You get people clearing up inaccuracies who can't spell "seize."
    I was always told it was the guy with the higher post count that was right hehe...

  13. #13
    Fini les ecrase-"manets"!
    Reputation: bikeboy389's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    9,416
    Quote Originally Posted by SirBubb
    Just bought a set of Crank Bros. Candy pedals to replace my old cage pedals. However , the old pedals don't want to come off and I'm not sure which direction I should be turning the allen wrench (6 mm). Any suggestions for making this easier? Please help a Noob!
    I'll try to go around the p*ssing match here.

    You CAN take your pedals off with an allen wrench--but only if they weren't overtightened to begin with (that's right, they don't need to be arm-breaking tight-and I fall into the "use grease" camp, though I use only a tiny bit).

    If you use a pedal wrench to put them on, and really crank on it, you'll definitely have trouble getting them loose with a shorter wrench.

    I don't know about the Candy pedals, but the CB Quattros don't even have wrench flats--you HAVE to use an allen wrench.

    If you can't use a pedal wrench, and can't get the leverage you need to loosen things with your standard hex keys, I suggest that you look into getting a set of allen wrench sockets to go on a socket wrench. You can get any length of wrench you need (including a torque wrench), and they'll work great. Even cheaper ones from places like Harbor Freight are good enough for most work.

    By the way, I find I can generate a large amount of force for loosening by lining up a regular ol' allen wrench so it's nearly parallel to the crank, but not quite, so that I can squeeze the crank and wrench together as though trying to line them up (I'm probably not describing this very well). It's gotten my pedals off lots of times when I was frustrated by a pedal wrench (which can be hard to use, in my experience).

    As to turning direction, here's an easy-to-remember rule of thumb. With the handle of your tool pointing up, push the handle toward the rear of the bike to loosen (on the drive side, this is counter-clockwise). This works on either side of the bike, with the cranks in any position.

  14. #14
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: coldplay's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    82
    "OK, just to clear up some inaccurate info given by these 'newbie-savants', you will need most likely a 15mm wrench, not a 9/16". Also, the stuff is called "anti-sieze" compound, made by permatex. Ain't the internet great? Ask a technical question and all sorts of people will give you bad, dumb, or incomplete answers!!"



    Well, well, well... it's a good thing you're here Dave, otherwise there would be no one here to insult others! So I stand corrected on the open end wrench size... this is however a tool that works just fine.
    And since we are being critical here, you might want to know that there are actually of ton of different manufacturers that produce "anti-seize", "Anti-SEEZE", and Never-Sieze! I happen to have Anti-Seize by VersaChem Type 13 Hi-Temp Copper Formula, that resists temperatures up to +2000 Deg. F. But that's only because I use in on my tractor mower deck and other high temp bolts... it also works wonders on pedals.
    Last edited by coldplay; 08-22-2005 at 01:42 PM.

  15. #15
    Adorable Furry Hombre
    Reputation: Marc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    28,584
    Oh Moderator??

    Could this thread get locked B4it starts getting ugly...I think the OP has been enlightened to the best extent possible.
    "Refreshingly Unconcerned With The Vulgar Exigencies Of Veracity "

  16. #16
    Arrogant roadie.....
    Reputation: Dave_Stohler's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    4,232
    Quote Originally Posted by wim
    "The stuff" I (and probably lawrence) use is in fact called "Anti-Seez" and is not made by Permatex. Works pretty well.


    OK, you can now remove your foot from your mouth......
    We are the 801
    We are the central shaft

  17. #17
    Fini les ecrase-"manets"!
    Reputation: bikeboy389's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    9,416
    Quote Originally Posted by Dave_Stohler


    OK, you can now remove your foot from your mouth......
    Dave,

    You should read what you quoted a little more carefully before you go talking about feet in mouths.

    The quote says what they use is NOT made by Permatex, and is spelled "anti-seez." That's NOT made by Permatex.

    Since they weren't talking about Permatex products, posting a picture of them is supposed to prove...what?

  18. #18
    Adorable Furry Hombre
    Reputation: Marc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    28,584
    BB389-if you want to get @ Stohler, you should start lecturing him on what he should be having to drink....;)

    Quote Originally Posted by bikeboy389
    Dave,

    You should read what you quoted a little more carefully before you go talking about feet in mouths.

    The quote says what they use is NOT made by Permatex, and is spelled "anti-seez." That's NOT made by Permatex.

    Since they weren't talking about Permatex products, posting a picture of them is supposed to prove...what?
    "Refreshingly Unconcerned With The Vulgar Exigencies Of Veracity "

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 16
    Last Post: 04-27-2005, 07:22 PM
  2. new pedals, finally.
    By rufus in forum General Cycling Discussion
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 04-05-2005, 01:21 PM
  3. Nashbar pedals
    By HANK in forum Components, Wrenching
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 02-09-2005, 06:51 AM
  4. A stuoid/silly question from me regarding Road Clpless pedals
    By chanhoward in forum Components, Wrenching
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 06-19-2004, 03:55 AM
  5. New bike..new pedals..but what ??
    By yellowspox in forum General Cycling Discussion
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 02-24-2004, 10:05 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT ROADBIKEREVIEW

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2020 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.