Mountain Pedals on Road Bike
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  1. #1
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    Mountain Pedals on Road Bike

    I went to the bike shop to buy my first set of clipless tonight after explaining my needs and riding style to the sales dude, he talked me into putting some Crank Brothers Candy mountain pedals on my road bike.

    I told him I wanted something easy to get in and out of; something that has a reasonable amount of play; and something I could walk around in since Wifey and I often ride for a destination and not just for riding sake.

    He convinced me that this is a pretty popular thing to do and that I wouldn't lose and real performance with this set up. I believe him and feel as if I made the right choice. I just wanted to get RBR's feeling on putting mountain pedals on a road bike. Thanks for any input!

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mufasa View Post
    I went to the bike shop to buy my first set of clipless tonight after explaining my needs and riding style to the sales dude, he talked me into putting some Crank Brothers Candy mountain pedals on my road bike.

    I told him I wanted something easy to get in and out of; something that has a reasonable amount of play; and something I could walk around in since Wifey and I often ride for a destination and not just for riding sake.

    He convinced me that this is a pretty popular thing to do and that I wouldn't lose and real performance with this set up. I believe him and feel as if I made the right choice. I just wanted to get RBR's feeling on putting mountain pedals on a road bike. Thanks for any input!
    Nothing wrong with mtn pedals on road bikes. I have set Crank Brothers Egg Beaters one of my road bike just for when need walkability.

  3. #3
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    No problem using mtn (spd) pedals on a road bike. Not sure what difference there is in performance; maybe about 15% less efficient than road style pedals.

  4. #4
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    the candys do have a platform, though the contact is either the front wing or rear wing, not both.
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  5. #5
    Formosan Cyclocross
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    I use eggbeaters on my road bike and candy pedals on my CX/commute/tourer bike. It makes for easy transitions. I just use one pair of Sidi shoes between the two.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by tbsurf View Post
    + 1
    No problem using mtn (spd) pedals on a road bike. Not sure what difference there is in performance; maybe about 15% less efficient than road style pedals.
    Where did you come up with that number?

  7. #7
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    i tried 105 pedals but had been using mountain bike SPDs (m540)
    I went back to the MTB cleats and pedals on the road bike because I prefered double sided pedals...
    nothing wrong at all and and I find it easier to unclip and clip in when stopping while on SPDs in comparison to 105s

  8. #8
    DEK
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    I use Eggbeaters on my road bike and love them. The 4-sided entry makes them so freakin easy to clip in. I never have to look down to figure out if the pedal is the right side up because every side is the right side.

  9. #9
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    MTB pedals

    I use Speedplay Frogs on all my bikes, including road and tandem.

    Sometimes folks look at them funny, but that's it. And when you're on the bike its hard to tell the difference. I'd question that 15% loss.

    Sure makes walking around easier and if you have several bikes you can run one pedal system...

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  10. #10
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    +1 for mountain bike pedals on my road bike. I do have an easier time walking around at break points.

  11. #11
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    If you want to be able to walk in your shoes then you can't beat MTB pedals. Shimano's road pedals are supposed to be very "walkable" but I can speak from experience and say it's still annoying to do anything more than walk into and out of a coffee shop.

    I don't do a lot of stopping and/or walking before, during, or after my rides so I'm fine with road pedals. If I were touring I'd probably consider candies (I have eggbeaters on my CX bike and they are nice but lack a large platform).

  12. #12
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    I don't believe there's any intrinsic performance loss with MTB pedals vs. road pedals.

    You do have to pay a little more attention to the shoe with a mountain system, though. A lot of racing-oriented MTB shoes are just that brand's road shoe with a lugged sole glued on. It adds a tiny bit of weight and generates a tiny bit of turbulence. No big deal, IMHO. You can worry about it when your sponsors are giving you shoes and pressuring you to put them on a podium.

    However, there are also some pretty crappy mountain bike shoes out there. Stuff targeted at commuters and cycle tourists. They really mean casual cyclists, though. There's just no positive way to advertise that. Anyway, if you got shoes in this category, you have them now and in reality the difference between these shoes and higher-performance ones isn't likely to make itself felt until your rides get longer or you start cranking out more watts. In which case I still say you're fine if you get some racing shoes.

    For the sake of disclosure, my nicer road bike has a road system. I have a flaky knee that it's nice to. I wish I could standardize all my bikes on a MTB system, though.

  13. #13
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    No problem with mtb pedals on road bike. My LBS talked me into them, and I'm glad I went that route.

    Good luck!
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  14. #14
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    I run the same SPD pedals on my MTB and road bike. Double sided pedal, walkable shoes, and same pair of shoes works on all my bikes. What's not to like?

  15. #15
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    I think the LBS dude listened to your needs and intended riding style and made a perfect recommendation! The Candy have float, easy entry/release but with good retention, a small platform for pedaling until you clip in, and a walkable cleat.

    I ride Candy's on my cross bike, including medium-long (50-60 mile) dirt and paved road rides in the offseason. I have a friend that won a 200-mile race with Candy's on his Cervelo P4. If it's good enough for him its good enough for most of us. If you are locked in there will not be any efficiency loss from the pedal system.

    You didn't mention what kind of shoes your are using, other than walkable. If you push the distance for longer rides over 2 hours, you might notice some foot fatigue if the shoes are highly flexible. For riding to the coffee shop or movies or whatever I'm sure your shoes are fine.
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  16. #16
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    I run SPD pedals on my Orbea Onix because I frequently have to walk a bit on my routes. Love them and have no desire to change to another system.

  17. #17
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    Thanks for all of the responses! I'm glad everyone feels as if I got into the proper setup.

    I purchased a set of Shimano shoes but I don't know the model off the top of my head.

    Any additional input is appreciated!

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mufasa View Post
    Thanks for all of the responses! I'm glad everyone feels as if I got into the proper setup.

    I purchased a set of Shimano shoes but I don't know the model off the top of my head.

    Any additional input is appreciated!
    As has already been said, your shop hooked you up with exactly what they thought you needed based on what you said. Personally, I'd say this is a sign of a solid LBS worth patronizing in the future. Enjoy the bike!
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  19. #19
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    If you do experience hot-spots with the smaller cleats (I did initially), I highly recommend a carbon fiber soled shoe. I have a pair of the Specialized Expert MTB shoes and love them!!!!

  20. #20
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    I wear Scott MTB shoes with Shimano M 520 pedals. Works for me.

  21. #21
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    I tried both road pedals and mtb pedals. For rides with a lot of stop-and-go, I prefer SPD. I find them easier to clip in and out of without looking down. I had a few close calls and I had no problem unclipping in time while using the multi-directional cleats.

    On longer uninterrupted rides, I use SPD-SL because they feel more comfortable to me after 30+ miles. I always have to look down while clipping into them, which is why I don't use them for stop-and-go traffic. I also find them a little more difficult to get out of in panic situations, even with the tension turned down all the way (I use the yellow cleats but perhaps the red cleats would improve the ease of release).

    For what it's worth, I've fallen over 3 times while using SPD-SL while I haven't fallen once with SPD.
    Last edited by teflondog; 02-16-2012 at 09:19 AM.
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  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by teflondog View Post
    I use SPD-SL...
    ...I use the yellow cleats but perhaps the red cleats would improve the ease of release.
    Just a FYI, the only tension adjustment is at the rear of Shimano SPD-SL pedals. The difference between the red and yellow cleats is that reds are fixed, yellows allow for some (6-7 degrees) of float. No difference in tension levels using either cleat.

  23. #23
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    New Wellgo MTB pedals

    I just installed a pair of Wellgo M138 MTB pedals. They were a bit "tight" to spin on their shafts, so I decided to disassemble & lube them. These are labeled "sealed bearings" on the package. When taken apart I found a sealed bearing on the outboard end of each pedal. But the inboard end is just a plastic bushing that rides on the steel shaft. I lubed the pedals with a light grease & reassembled them - they spin more freely now.
    Question: Should quality pedals have a real bearing on both inboard & outboard ends? I'm not concerned whether the bearings are sealed or "loose ball", but is a bushing an acceptable thing to find on a decent pedal?

  24. #24
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    Debatable. The old Speedplay X/3s had bushings; I believe the model that has replaced them is supposed to have a bearing. IIRC, some Time ATACs have, or had bushings.

    It's up to you to decide what's acceptable to you. I probably wouldn't have disassembled the pedals in the first place. But if it effects anything, it's just going to be wear life. MKS is pretty well-regarded as a more permanent choice if you don't want to do clipless.

    It seems like a strange pedal to buy. Are yours the quick release ones? (What is that even for?)

  25. #25
    Cycling induced anoesis
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    Quote Originally Posted by hazilim View Post
    I just installed a pair of Wellgo M138 MTB pedals. They were a bit "tight" to spin on their shafts, so I decided to disassemble & lube them. These are labeled "sealed bearings" on the package. When taken apart I found a sealed bearing on the outboard end of each pedal. But the inboard end is just a plastic bushing that rides on the steel shaft. I lubed the pedals with a light grease & reassembled them - they spin more freely now.
    Question: Should quality pedals have a real bearing on both inboard & outboard ends? I'm not concerned whether the bearings are sealed or "loose ball", but is a bushing an acceptable thing to find on a decent pedal?
    That 'drag' that you experienced is common with some bike components, and is due to both product design and manufacturing tolerances. Current generation Shimano cranksets/ BB's (as one example) are known to have this 'drag', until they essentially break in, which can take hundreds of miles. Same applies to their RD upper (guide) pulleys. And no, this added resistance doesn't affect performance.

    There are a variety of bushing designs and applications, but as they relate to bike components, a bearing assembly is generally higher in cost and regarded as higher quality and more durable. If I searched on the right model, at your price point the use of bushings with bearings is fairly common. That's not to say your pedals won't last for thousands of miles, and as you describe it, I'd venture to guess that the plastic (or maybe nylon) sleeve will be the first to go (and should be replaceable), but time will tell.

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