My new road bike. What to add? - Page 3
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  1. #51
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    Guessing your going to keep the bike so at least get a fit. Not sure what's in the saddle bag but you will want a flat kit and a spare tube. I think for piece of mind I would take the bike to a different shop and at least get the frame looked over. See if they find anything questionable, no need to pay full price if it's damaged and if it is return it. Other than that ride the wheels off it.
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  2. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by mantrain View Post
    Yes, I have to take all the tape off to figure out the handlebars. I have checked e-bay. The prices are quite varied.
    As you've been told numerous times, you can't go by what people are "asking" for on ebay. You need to look at what things sold for. And even then, people (as you know) pay more than what they should.

    Quote Originally Posted by mantrain View Post
    Attachment 315060

    a close up of the handlebars.
    So the guy who sold you the bike isn't a fraud, but he convinced you they were $400 handlebars, yet couldn't even tell what brand they were.


    Quote Originally Posted by mantrain View Post
    OMG thanks I wasn't sure what I got myself into here. If I over spent $300 trust me in the course of my life it won't be a big deal I am more intereted in enjoying my time. I trialed this bike and fell in love with it. All sorts of posters here have basically said 'you asked our opinion it is to your peril if you do not take it.'

    Worse case scenario is the bike sits there. If I over paid $300, life will tolerate that somehow -- that is not cancer or hepatitis.
    Well... you probably paid more than $300 over. But that's not really the issue. You're emotionally in love with a bike, yet you could've gotten a better bike for the money and loved it even more.

    Worst case scenario is.... you've got a 12yro bike in unknown condition. The reason the fork and wheels were replaced is because it was crashed. The carbon frame is internally damaged (which you can't see) and it's going to fail on you.
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  3. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by Migen21 View Post
    Here is my feeling about this.

    The bike is worth whatever the OP is willing to pay for it. If he's happy with the bike and plans to ride the crap out of it for many years, it's probably a great deal in the long run. I'm guessing resale value is not a consideration here.

    I think what most of us are concerned about is that the OP might be making a decision based on emotion, and not common sense. He really wants a carbon bike, and this one presented itself to him.

    He could go around to every bike shop within driving distance and may not find another bike he likes as much for the money.

    In the end, it's only money, and while $800 or whatever is a lot of money in some contexts, over the course of a lifetime, it's a drop in the bucket.

    To the OP, my suggestion would be, if you decide to keep that bike, to just smile and be happy about it. Stop trying to resolve all of these details in this thread. It's really all just a bunch of minutiae. You know if you are prone to emotional purchase mistakes. If you have made that kind of mistake in the past, then hopefully learned from it, and can apply those lessons here. If you are really in love with the bike, and are willing to pay what the guy is asking, then by all means buy it, and ride the crap out of it. Just understand that you have to live with the decision down the road.

    You and only you (and your family) have to deal with this. If you buy the bike and after a month or two decide you don't enjoy riding it, or can't stand the look of it, then you've blown your money and are stuck with it. If your $800 means a lot to you, then I'd step back and reconsider for a week or three. If after that time you still want the bike, go buy it and ride the crap out of it.

    I know from experience having a bike you don't love is just a waste of space and money. It will just sit in your garage and not get ridden.
    An extremely insighful post. Yes buying consumer items is essentially emotional. Few of us make a living on biking. I really love the feel of this bike and if you look back at the reviews of this model/year it has been very positive for those who have ridden and reviewd. my experience is MTBng but I can feel good bike. For $800 the feel is great Very smooth, very responsive, very light. I am sure it does not compare to current technology but I am not going to spend more than $800.

    Mtbk remains my number one passion so far as biking goes. I love being in the nature more than in the road. So, I do not even want to invest the time to find a bike like this that is a few bucks cheaper. There will always be a better deal. And I have no doubt there are better deals out there and the posters indicate. But so long as this bike is what it is, and there are no hidden issues, than I will be fine.
    I have many other interests in life so again I am not going to invest that much time into finding a good carbon fiber bike that I can afford. Thanks for great comments.

  4. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by tlg View Post
    As you've been told numerous times, you can't go by what people are "asking" for on ebay. You need to look at what things sold for. And even then, people (as you know) pay more than what they should.

    So the guy who sold you the bike isn't a fraud, but he convinced you they were $400 handlebars, yet couldn't even tell what brand they were.


    Well... you probably paid more than $300 over. But that's not really the issue. You're emotionally in love with a bike, yet you could've gotten a better bike for the money and loved it even more.

    Worst case scenario is.... you've got a 12yro bike in unknown condition. The reason the fork and wheels were replaced is because it was crashed. The carbon frame is internally damaged (which you can't see) and it's going to fail on you.

    wait a second, the frame is internally cracked? You know this how? That is quite an accusation. I know that in the world of MNTBG we change compeonents all the time.

    Just the same I have a bill of sale that indicates the bike is sold in "good condition." If the frame is cracked -- I will get my money back or crucify the LBS owner, and I mean crucify -- if that means all my friends getting on Yelp or picketing on the weekend in front of his store.

    I do not care about the $800. I love the bike right now. If I over paid (and these most commonly are being sold on the internet for what I paid) than no big deal!
    $800 is not a lot of money for me. I spent an amount of money that I could afford to spend without any second thought. But it is a big deal if there is a material defect.

  5. #55
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    Wait a second, the frame is internally cracked? You know this how? That is quite an accusation. I know that in the world of MNTBG we change components all the time.

    Just the same I have a bill of sale that indicates the bike is sold in "good condition." If the frame is cracked -- I will get my money back or crucify the LBS owner, and I mean crucify -- if that means all my friends getting on Yelp or picketing on the weekend in front of his store.

    I do not care about the $800. I love the bike right now. If I over paid (and these most commonly are being sold on the internet for what I paid) than no big deal!
    $800 is not a lot of money for me. I spent an amount of money that I could afford to spend without any second thought. But it is a big deal if there is a material defect.


    Edit -- this is a brand new shop. the man who owns it is a retiree engineer from Solar Turbines -- a very large employer in San Diego. I can read people and in his mind he provided a fair exchange. HE honestly believes that this is a good bike for the money and that the bike is "sweet" "clean" etc. "The best bike in this store."
    I believe he believes this. I believe he is not trying to swindle me and that he is trying hard to develop his customer base. He spent a ton of time with me but I Can tell you he is not an expert on bikes -- I would rate him as an advanced amateur if there is such a thing. Still, if there is a defect he might try and blame me, saying that I must have crashed it. I will not let him get away with that. I will have a ton of fun discouraging new customers by picketing the front of the store.

    Okay, I just want to make sure the carbon fiber frame is all good. Last post freaked me out.

  6. #56
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    Mantrain,

    I can't speak for others, but the fact that the fork and wheels are not original is worrisome. The fork especially. Those don't normally wear out, or get replaced as a component upgrade. They get replaced when they are damaged.

    That isn't to say you shouldn't buy the bike, but this is the kind of thing you can leverage for a better deal. It's a 12 year old carbon fiber bike that does not have the original fork, and no one knows why. Tell him you are concerned about the possibility that it's been crashed and may be been damaged, and that you'd either like a discount, or you'd like some kind of a return warranty if it turns out that there is a problem.

    Damage to carbon fiber is not always obvious (it doesn't fail in the same way metals do). You really can't be certain it's not damaged without having an inspection done by a qualified person with the proper equipment (i'm not talking your typical hack bike shop mechanic here).

    The fact is, buying used CF bikes is a sketchy proposition under any circumstances. Buying a 12 year old CF bike that doesn't have it's original fork raises some flags for me.

  7. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by Migen21 View Post
    Mantrain,

    I can't speak for others, but the fact that the fork and wheels are not original is worrisome. The fork especially. Those don't normally wear out, or get replaced as a component upgrade. They get replaced when they are damaged.

    That isn't to say you shouldn't buy the bike, but this is the kind of thing you can leverage for a better deal. It's a 12 year old carbon fiber bike that does not have the original fork, and no one knows why. Tell him you are concerned about the possibility that it's been crashed and may be been damaged, and that you'd either like a discount, or you'd like some kind of a return warranty if it turns out that there is a problem.

    Damage to carbon fiber is not always obvious (it doesn't fail in the same way metals do). You really can't be certain it's not damaged without having an inspection done by a qualified person with the proper equipment (i'm not talking your typical hack bike shop mechanic here).

    The fact is, buying used CF bikes is a sketchy proposition under any circumstances. Buying a 12 year old CF bike that doesn't have it's original fork raises some flags for me.
    When dealing with used bikes there are usually more questions than answers, but based on the track record of the OE wheelset (Bonty paired spoked wheels) it's not surprising they were replaced along the way.

    They had a rep for cracking around the spoke holes, and since Trek has a lifetime warranty, were replacing them regularly. If you'll notice, their current wheelset offerings are of a more conventional design.

    To the remainder of your post, I think you're spot-on. Buying used CF is a gamble, and IMO in this price range newer alu or steel are better bets - and easily found in the used bike market.

    OP, I do have one (rhetorical) question for you. If the amount paid is no big deal for you, why did you mention the bike being over your budget in an earlier post. So much so, that you made a deal with the LBS to pay 1/2 upon receipt, the other half in (I believe) a week. Seems a bit of a contradiction.

  8. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by PJ352 View Post
    When dealing with used bikes there are usually more questions than answers, but based on the track record of the OE wheelset (Bonty paired spoked wheels) it's not surprising they were replaced along the way.

    They had a rep for cracking around the spoke holes, and since Trek has a lifetime warranty, were replacing them regularly. If you'll notice, their current wheelset offerings are of a more conventional design.

    To the remainder of your post, I think you're spot-on. Buying used CF is a gamble, and IMO in this price range newer alu or steel are better bets - and easily found in the used bike market.

    OP, I do have one (rhetorical) question for you. If the amount paid is no big deal for you, why did you mention the bike being over your budget in an earlier post. So much so, that you made a deal with the LBS to pay 1/2 upon receipt, the other half in (I believe) a week. Seems a bit of a contradiction.
    I am going to Hawaii on Sat so I don't want any cash issues. Money is always an issue but in the longer scheme if I am happy with this bike -- that is to say, if it does not fail, then the money is not an issue.

  9. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by mantrain View Post
    I am going to Hawaii on Sat so I don't want any cash issues. Money is always an issue but in the longer scheme if I am happy with this bike -- that is to say, if it does not fail, then the money is not an issue.
    I understand. This is your money and most likely going to be your bike, so we don't have to agree with your decision.

    Whatever it is, I hope it works well for you. It's a great sport, just ride safe.

  10. #60
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    If you enjoy riding the bike why change things? Change what you don't like, not change for changes sake. The wheels were already swapped which is huge. On my Trek I swapped the wheels and handlebars. Original wheels while bullet proof were very out of date and not stiff or light, just solid. The handlebars didn't fit my hands well so swapped them for an Aluminum 3T with a shallower bend. I'd say you have a good bike on your hands.

    Saddle is usually the first thing people replace. I had two saddles on my Trek before getting it right. Same thing occurred on my Colnago. Avoided the issue on my Firefly as I just told the bike shop to purchase the same saddle I used on my C-59.
    Last edited by Trek_5200; 07-13-2016 at 02:01 AM.

  11. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by mantrain View Post
    I am just trying to gather the facts because I see varied prices on the internet and I am not sure how I would otherwise afford carbon fiber. I have ridden it 20 miles and no issues in terms of back aches or anything afterward. it seemed seamless but I have not yet decided. I called the LBS and they told me they would refund the $, but I need to be sure first because I really to love the feel of the bike.
    Hey, excuse me for breaking in, but isn't this frame the one Lance Armstrong was winning TDF's on and wanted to keep riding when Trek switched the team over to a different design? That's a great bike, and it rides like one too, right? Keep it and enjoy!

    Bend the brake levers down a little so you can get in the drops and lay on the hoods.

    And level that saddle.

    If dealer is willing to take it back, he'd probably take a cut on the balance, right? Offer him another $150 and see where it goes.

    Really, that bike may be a diamond in the rough. If Lance liked it, you will too!

  12. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fredrico View Post
    Hey, excuse me for breaking in, but isn't this frame the one Lance Armstrong was winning TDF's on and wanted to keep riding when Trek switched the team over to a different design? That's a great bike, and it rides like one too, right? Keep it and enjoy!

    Bend the brake levers down a little so you can get in the drops and lay on the hoods.

    And level that saddle.

    If dealer is willing to take it back, he'd probably take a cut on the balance, right? Offer him another $150 and see where it goes.

    Really, that bike may be a diamond in the rough. If Lance liked it, you will too!
    I still ride my 5200 on occasion. It's a 2001 model. It's a good frame. Some of the criticisms of the ride are really about the wheels in my opinion. Provides a nice ride. Geometry isn't as good for me as my Colnago is but for a 2001 bike , its very good. And like Fredrico wrote, it was good enough for Lance.

  13. #63
    tlg
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    Quote Originally Posted by mantrain View Post
    wait a second, the frame is internally cracked? You know this how? That is quite an accusation. I know that in the world of MNTBG we change compeonents all the time.
    Are you even reading what people write?

    I said that was worst case scenario. I don't know. But the key point is neither do you.
    Sure, people change components all the time. But not typically a fork (with one that doesn't match), and not by "a dentist that never used the bike much".

    Just the same I have a bill of sale that indicates the bike is sold in "good condition." If the frame is cracked -- I will get my money back or crucify the LBS owner
    It was an as is sale. You have no warranty. Just as in buying a used car, it's the buyers responsibility to do their due diligence before purchase. You'd have to prove the LBS knew it wasn't in "good condition" and lied to you. Which you'd never do. He doesn't even know what he sold you and you claim he "believed it's a good bike".

    This is why people were telling you you'd be better off buying a new bike for the same money. New bikes come with warranties.

    Still, if there is a defect he might try and blame me, saying that I must have crashed it. I will not let him get away with that. I will have a ton of fun discouraging new customers by picketing the front of the store.
    Of course he will. You own it now and he has no control over what you do to it.
    I don't think you need to worry about picketing in front of the store. Sounds like he won't be in business long.
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  14. #64
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    tlg, you've made your opinion on it pretty clear and a lot of regulars here are probably in agreement with you at least to some degree. If you keep hammering your point in I don't think you're going to change mantrain's mind at this point, but you could drive away a new user who could add valuable conversation to our forum...

    mantrain, on the flip side you have to understand the users hear have a TON of experience and their collective advice should be taken into account. Nothing drives some of the people here (or other forum communities) more nuts than when a newbie asks a question, gets the same answer from multiple people, and then appears to toss the advice aside. Whether or not that's what's happening here is of course subjective, just something to think about.

    Bike rides great and you like it? Awesome. YOU don't feel like you overpaid for it? Awesome. Enjoy it. BUT people who are telling you it's an extremely old bike, has had some changes made to it that cause questions, and that in general the price you paid for it is too high... are all correct.

    And with regard to the shop... if they are "unable" or unwilling to answer questions about the bike and couldn't tell you things like what year it was, it really is a questionable shop because they are either not knowledgeable enough to be in the business they are in, or they are scammers.

  15. #65
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    Honest opinion here, but that bike is absolute dud for what you paid for it.

    My first road bike was the bargin brand novara, aluminum frame carbon fork 105 groupset, completely new for 900 dollars and with rei points 10% was a steal.

    Aluminum is the best for beginner road bike because it will be banged up and slightly abused.

    I would go back to the shop you got that trek and see if you can get your money back.

  16. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by pittcanna View Post
    Honest opinion here, but that bike is absolute dud for what you paid for it.

    My first road bike was the bargin brand novara, aluminum frame carbon fork 105 groupset, completely new for 900 dollars and with rei points 10% was a steal.

    Aluminum is the best for beginner road bike because it will be banged up and slightly abused.

    I would go back to the shop you got that trek and see if you can get your money back.

    I want carbon fiber.

  17. #67
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    Quote Originally Posted by mantrain View Post
    I want carbon fiber.
    You want carbon fiber, But you need aluminum.

    The first year i rode aluminum no issues, you are still on flat pedals for godsake.

  18. #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by mantrain View Post
    I want carbon fiber.
    Nothing wrong with "wanting" carbon fiber. We all do. But carbon fiber & aluminum have come a long way in the last 12 years. A modern aluminum bike with modern components is every bit as good (and probably better) than a bike from 12yrs ago.


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  19. #69
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    if I was to go aluminum I would just stay with MTbing. The heart wants what the heart wants. plus I want to avoid buying something made in China. At least I have something made in the Good ole

    Damn Chinese.

  20. #70
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    Quote Originally Posted by mantrain View Post
    if I was to go aluminum I would just stay with MTbing. The heart wants what the heart wants. plus I want to avoid buying something made in China. At least I have something made in the Good ole

    Damn Chinese.
    Dude you know aluminum is still a competitive material look at crit racing and cyclocross. Used carbon fiber is worse than new aluminum especially since they installed a new fork and wheels. Because it has been crashed.

  21. #71
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    Quote Originally Posted by mantrain View Post
    OMG thanks I wasn't sure what I got myself into here. If I over spent $300 trust me in the course of my life it won't be a big deal I am more intereted in enjoying my time. I trialed this bike and fell in love with it. All sorts of posters here have basically said 'you asked our opinion it is to your peril if you do not take it.'

    Worse case scenario is the bike sits there. If I over paid $300, life will tolerate that somehow -- that is not cancer or hepatitis.
    Sorry I'm late to the party. A few thoughts:

    1) What something is worth to YOU may not be what is "market rate". Market rate is an average price a buyer and seller agree on. If you love the bike, it may be worth more. If you hate it, it's worth nothing.

    2) It's obvious the wheels were changed. As stated before, the paired spoke Bontrager wheels of that vintage were notorious for spoke hole cracks. Just about every one of these had this problem. Be glad you didn't get the original wheels!!!!!

    3) The fork looks like it may have been changed - maybe. It is entirely possible Trek changed the fork design mid-model year. I found these two pics of the same bike in the same color. Each has a different fork design:

    https://www.gcbicycling.com/2004_520...right_side.jpg

    2004 Trek 5200 Oclv Carbon Road Bicycle | eBay

    And if the fork was indeed changed, it is no guarantee that the reason was because it was crashed. Probable, but not 100% certain. Maybe a ham fisted mechanic cracked the steerer tube while clamping down the new handlebars?

    That being said, bikes do get crashed. I would take ANY used carbon bike to a reputable bike shop that has been in business for awhile and have them go over the frame with a fine tooth comb to look for cracks.

    And definitely get a proper fit. A proper fit is one where they put you and your bike on a trainer, watch you pedal and make adjustments to dial in your fit just right. Any bike shop worth their weight should do this when they sell a bike. If you take it some place where you didn't buy the bike, it will cost you around $100-200, but it is money well spent and will improve your enjoyment of the bike.
    Last edited by Lombard; 07-13-2016 at 10:25 AM.
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  22. #72
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    Quote Originally Posted by pittcanna View Post
    Used carbon fiber is worse than new aluminum especially since they installed a new fork and wheels. Because it has been crashed.
    New fork and wheels is suspicious, but not proof it's been crashed.
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  23. #73
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    Quote Originally Posted by mantrain View Post
    I want carbon fiber.
    And you're getting top of the line carbon fiber approved by the Motorola cycling team which won races on that very bike. Go for it. Don't let people compare it to a cheap ass sub thousand dollar aluminum bike. The 5200 is a way superior ride and you will appreciate that the more you ride it. It may ride stiffer than today's carbon frames. Lance preferred it over I believe the Madone which followed the 5200 as the team bike.

    Carbon absorbs shocks better than aluminum. That will save you from being "beat up" by the stiff and responsive handling the 5200 provides. Go for it.
    Last edited by Fredrico; 07-13-2016 at 10:06 AM.

  24. #74
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    Quote Originally Posted by pittcanna View Post
    Aluminum is the best for beginner road bike because it will be banged up and slightly abused.
    based on your extensive personal research no doubt...

  25. #75
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    Quote Originally Posted by mantrain View Post
    if I was to go aluminum I would just stay with MTbing. The heart wants what the heart wants. plus I want to avoid buying something made in China. At least I have something made in the Good ole.......

    The last USA made bike by Trek or Cannondale was 2010, except for a select few $6,000+ bikes. Giant and Specialized moved production to Asia way before that.
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