My new road bike. What to add? - Page 4
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  1. #76
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    Quote Originally Posted by Oxtox View Post
    based on your extensive personal research no doubt...
    Especially when i started using the clipless pedals.

    I am not going to lie i fell quite a few times.

  2. #77
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    He's not a newbie. He's been mountain biking and knows how to not fall off (I'm assuming here).

    Aluminum is what it is. It's NOT for me. My first 'modern' bike was aluminium. It felt fine riding it around the bike shop parking lot, but I could not stand riding it for more than 30 min max. After sitting in my garage for 4 years not being ridden, I dusted off the cobwebs and sold it and went with a modern carbon bike, which worked MUCH better for me.

    Also, as someone pointed out, comparing a team bike from 2004 to a recent model entry level REI aluminum bike is not a good comparison. Sure, the stuff is older, but if the bike is in safe condition, the Trek is hands down a better bike.

  3. #78
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    mantrain, I say go ahead and buy the bike. You like it, and you want to try riding a road bike. I have no opinion on price/value, carbon vs. aluminum (all my bikes are steel), or most of the rest of this. If you want to try negotiating the price down a bit, you probably can succeed at that, but if you don't feel like doing that, whatever.

    You did, however, begin this thread asking about what else you should buy. Based on your concerns about cars on the road in the other thread, I strongly advise giving mirrors a try. Not everyone likes them or learns to use them well, and some roadies reject them for aesthetic or other reasons that I don't think are very well considered, but that's their choice. I do think that a new road rider should at least give them a serious try before deciding.

    Here are the ones I like, but there are other designs.
    maxresdefault.jpg
    Sprintech Dropbar Mirror > Accessories > Commuting & Touring > Mirrors | Jenson USA
    Many people say the ones attached to the helmet or eyeglass frame give the best field of view, if you can get the hang of using them (I couldn't, because of the strong distortion of my prescription lenses). Try something to see what works for you.

    This is a topic of considerable debate around here (though it may have been a while since there was a long thread). If you do a search you can find a lot of viewpoints. It's likely someone will chime in with dissenting opinions soon ("just turn your head"; "just use your ears", etc.) My advice is at least to try it. You have expressed considerable anxiety about sharing the road with cars. In my experience, having a mirror and learning to use it well does a LOT to alleviate that.

    Happy riding.
    "None of us knows for sure what's out there; that's why we keep looking. Keep your faith; travel hopefully. The universe will surprise you, constantly." The 13th Doctor.

  4. #79
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    Quote Originally Posted by Migen21 View Post
    He's not a newbie. He's been mountain biking and knows how to not fall off (I'm assuming here).

    Aluminum is what it is. It's NOT for me. My first 'modern' bike was aluminium. It felt fine riding it around the bike shop parking lot, but I could not stand riding it for more than 30 min max. After sitting in my garage for 4 years not being ridden, I dusted off the cobwebs and sold it and went with a modern carbon bike, which worked MUCH better for me.

    Also, as someone pointed out, comparing a team bike from 2004 to a recent model entry level REI aluminum bike is not a good comparison. Sure, the stuff is older, but if the bike is in safe condition, the Trek is hands down a better bike.
    I have been riding all my 48 yrs but yeah just getting into cycling on the road. Okay I do feel like teen w this new bike -- the emotions of buying something that feels so nice to me. Very suprized regarding the "you got gypped " posts since this bike feels so nice. Okay by 2004 there was more than 100 years of developed bike technology. People seem to think that was ancient, but for me that was the day before yesterday. Hell, the nuke was first detonated in 1945. I really do not want a Chinese aluminum or Chinese carbon bike (take a trip to China and eat some food made of the famous "Chinese gutter oil". I know It's very hard to avoid Chinese without some serious deep pockets, but atleast:

    US of A.jpg

  5. #80
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    Unsure how much it matters, concerning whether his Trek ever sustained any kind of crash. Trek constructed the 5200 as a monococque (spelling?) layout, without internal joints or lugs. This makes the frame tremendously stiff and strong. My similarly monococque Kestrel 200sci (40k miles and still ridden occasionally) took a massive beating during one of my spills on a group ride, with a big dude piling into me. The crash gouged a couple spots on the frame. That was 20k miles ago! No problems, whatsoever! And I constantly inspect all areas of my trusty ol Kestrel for damage, including laying a heavy foot into it to see if any breakage might occur. Strong as all hell.

    Anyway, that's my experience. Your results may vary.

  6. #81
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    And next time you buy Chinese consider this:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gutter_oil

  7. #82
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    Quote Originally Posted by mantrain View Post
    And next time you buy Chinese consider this:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gutter_oil
    It's Taiwan, not China. And yes, a good chunk of ALL carbon frames (even those in the $5,000 price bracket) are made in factories in Taiwan, or are outsourced to other companies with factories in Taiwan.

    I think I understand your thought pattern a little better having read your latest response.

    It's interesting that you value something being made in USA - I'm reading between the lines - but at the same time do not put any value on the incremental American ingenuity accrued over the last ten years and translated into a vastly improved product. I'm speaking about SRAM's and Shimano's American R&D departments.
    "That pretty much sums it up. I'm 43 and my max is ~178-180. If that HR chart was mine or Froome's, we'd be on the verge of death. But for you it probably looks like a normal workout." -TLG

    LOLOLOL

  8. #83
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    How come nobody in this thread has asked if Trek makes good bikes?

  9. #84
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    Quote Originally Posted by 9W9W View Post
    It's Taiwan, not China. And yes, a good chunk of ALL carbon frames (even those in the $5,000 price bracket) are made in factories in Taiwan, or are outsourced to other companies with factories in Taiwan.
    If you look at the Wikipedia article, they said Mainland China AND Taiwan.

    And Trek has factories in both.
    "COMPLACENCY IS LETHAL - VOTE in November." - System Shock.

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  10. #85
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    Quote Originally Posted by 9W9W View Post
    It's interesting that you value something being made in USA - I'm reading between the lines - but at the same time do not put any value on the incremental American ingenuity accrued over the last ten years and translated into a vastly improved product. I'm speaking about SRAM's and Shimano's American R&D departments.
    If the bits and bobs start to break or wear but the frame lasts forever, he can always upgrade to an Ultegra 6800 groupset for pretty cheap, although that'll mean new wheels...

  11. #86
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    Quote Originally Posted by mantrain View Post
    if I was to go aluminum I would just stay with MTbing. The heart wants what the heart wants. plus I want to avoid buying something made in China. At least I have something made in the Good ole

    Damn Chinese.
    I was going to say something insightful, but then you had to be a xenophobe. A lot of Shimano is made in Singapore. You gonna damn the Singaporeans too? Stop being a jerk about this stuff. It's a global economy. Get used to it.
    Wake me up when it's alarm green.

  12. #87
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    Quote Originally Posted by jetdog9 View Post
    How come nobody in this thread has asked if Trek makes good bikes?
    This is a thread that could go on forever but that question really made me laugh.

  13. #88
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tachycardic View Post
    I was going to say something insightful, but then you had to be a xenophobe. A lot of Shimano is made in Singapore. You gonna damn the Singaporeans too? Stop being a jerk about this stuff. It's a global economy. Get used to it.

    I prefer made in USA. Sorry jerk or not I am not changing my mind on that one. Have you ever tasted gutter oil?

  14. #89
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    Not really clear on the bike purchase. Is it yours? Lot of heat for how you spend your money, really none of my business. Some quick thoughts for ya.
    1) just ride it and get a feel for the bike , get fitted but don't change anything that does not affect fit. Find out what you like and dislike and then you can get the bike where you want it. After two years I swapped out a set of 3T Ergosum bars for a set of Ergonova bars. Both are great bars but the drops are more comfortable and I like the shape of the tops.
    2) go for some clippless pedals and shoes. Not an upgrade but really a game changer for me. A more connected feel to the bike and consistent foot placement for developing a good pedal stroke.
    If the bike makes you happy go out and enjoy it. Get your money's worth of use out of it and enjoy road biking.
    2014 Felt F2 w Williams System 45/60 carbon clinchers

  15. #90
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    Quote Originally Posted by mantrain View Post
    I prefer made in USA. Sorry jerk or not I am not changing my mind on that one. Have you ever tasted gutter oil?
    Dude,

    Are you eating the bike or riding it? Oh, and I'm 99% sure that that "made in USA" sticker means that it was assembled here by parts made all over Asia, but I'll leave that to someone else to explain.

    It sounds like no matter what anyone has to say to you regarding this purchase, you have made up your mind.

    Personally, I'm done. Best of luck, I hope that our concerns about potential hidden damage on a bike sold to you by a huckster are unfounded and you did get that real gem of a ride.

    EEC

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  16. #91
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tachycardic View Post
    I was going to say something insightful, but then you had to be a xenophobe. A lot of Shimano is made in Singapore. You gonna damn the Singaporeans too? Stop being a jerk about this stuff. It's a global economy. Get used to it.
    Actually, most Shimano components are made in Malaysia.
    "COMPLACENCY IS LETHAL - VOTE in November." - System Shock.

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    bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."
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  17. #92
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    Quote Originally Posted by mantrain View Post
    I prefer made in USA. Sorry jerk or not I am not changing my mind on that one.
    Do you really know what the sticker means?

    Was the carbon fiber actually made and weaved in the USA?
    Where the shifters & brakes made in USA?
    Was the stem made in USA?
    Was the saddle made in USA?
    How about the tires and tubes?
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  18. #93
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    Quote Originally Posted by jetdog9 View Post
    If the bits and bobs start to break or wear but the frame lasts forever, he can always upgrade to an Ultegra 6800 groupset for pretty cheap, although that'll mean new wheels...
    That depends which generation of Ultegra wheels those are on his bike. If they are 6800, he's golden. If a previous generation, they will not work with an 11-speed cassette.
    "COMPLACENCY IS LETHAL - VOTE in November." - System Shock.

    "With
    bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."
    -- DCGriz, RBR.





  19. #94
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    Quote Originally Posted by FeltF75rider View Post
    1) just ride it and get a feel for the bike , get fitted but don't change anything that does not affect fit. Find out what you like and dislike and then you can get the bike where you want it.......

    ......Get your money's worth of use out of it and enjoy road biking.
    Mantrain,

    This.

    Now read that last line again, and again, and again. The more you ride and enjoy the bike, the better an investment it will be.

    About clipless pedals, I would hold off on that for awhile until you get really used to road riding. Don't introduce yourself to too many changes at once.....that is unless you already use clipless pedals on your mountain bike, then go ahead......if you want.

    Quote Originally Posted by mantrain View Post
    I prefer made in USA. Sorry jerk or not I am not changing my mind on that one. Have you ever tasted gutter oil?
    So do I and so do many others prefer USA made. However, that is getting nearly impossible in this day and age. For me, it's more of the human rights issue than anything else. I see the Foxconn workers with the "suicide nets" around the factory working 14 hour days, 7 days a week for slave wages while corporate execs and stockholders rake in record profits. Then the more "benevolent companies" are forced to also take their production overseas in order to be able to compete. It has spiraled to the point where there is no turning back. We close our eyes and buy this stuff - don't get me wrong, I'm guilty of it too.

    To be fair, you had my support until you made the remark "Damn Chinese" at which point, it became a xenophobic rant. At that point, you lost me and I'm sure many others here, sorry.
    Last edited by Lombard; 07-14-2016 at 05:56 AM.
    "COMPLACENCY IS LETHAL - VOTE in November." - System Shock.

    "With
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    -- DCGriz, RBR.





  20. #95
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    I do toe-clip pedals now.
    I used clipless for a while. I still have them, and could swap them out quickly.
    But I prefer being able to get off the bike and walk in case of emergency, or have firm footing for running away from danger, and so on.

    Also, my wife can pick up my bike and ride to check out a garage sale down the street, a friend can ride, etc.

    It takes a while to figure out shoes, and to get the strap right, but that effort is required either way.

    I have gotten older and I am transitioning into the old man phase where I don't care about what others might think of me on an organized ride.

    I also wear those mtn bike style cycling shorts all the time.

    People may see "Fred," but at least I can hold a steady pace for a long time, and achieve my goals.

    I did HHH in Wichita Falls one year, and got passed at about mile 75 by a guy wearing Chuck Taylors. That memory stays with me.

  21. #96
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    No offense to you other older folks on this board, but it's amazing how easy it is to pick out the older folks based on their world views. I mean you don't even have to ask, three posts in its painfully obvious. I'm sure the same applies to the other extreme of the age spectrum.
    "That pretty much sums it up. I'm 43 and my max is ~178-180. If that HR chart was mine or Froome's, we'd be on the verge of death. But for you it probably looks like a normal workout." -TLG

    LOLOLOL

  22. #97
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    Quote Originally Posted by tlg View Post
    Do you really know what the sticker means?

    Was the carbon fiber actually made and weaved in the USA?
    Where the shifters & brakes made in USA?
    Was the stem made in USA?
    Was the saddle made in USA?
    How about the tires and tubes?
    Never can be too sure. But I have to draw the line somewhere.

  23. #98
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    Quote Originally Posted by mantrain View Post
    And next time you buy Chinese consider this:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gutter_oil
    Violet Rutherford drinks gutter water.

  24. #99
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    Quote Originally Posted by 9W9W View Post
    No offense to you other older folks on this board.....
    Hey! I resemble that remark. Well, sort of. There are still many here older than I.
    "COMPLACENCY IS LETHAL - VOTE in November." - System Shock.

    "With
    bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."
    -- DCGriz, RBR.





  25. #100
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    Hey! I resemble that remark. Well, sort of. There are still many here older than I.
    If like me, you're old enough to remember Violet Rutherford, you're getting up there in years. If not, you're a whippersnapper.

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