Trek 1.2, Giant Defy 5, Specialized Allez Compact
Results 1 to 16 of 16
  1. #1
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    7

    Question Trek 1.2, Giant Defy 5, Specialized Allez Compact

    (please forgive me for the length) I am looking into getting a new road bike. I currently ride an old 1986 Panasonic DX-3000. It has been a good bike but the shifters are wearing out and it is time to replace the bike. I do not have a lot of money to spend so I have been looking primarily at a Giant Defy 5, Trek 1.2, or a Specialized Allez Compact. Some have complained about the components on these bikes such as the Shimano 2300s. I have a 10 yr old Trek 820 with bottom line Shimano Acera derailleurs (which had a bit of a delay when shifting) and it has survived numerous biking trips, caked mud, drenched in water, and even some impacts, numerous miles on the road (i did all the repairs and tuning myself). A friend had very expensive components (was almost always tuned and fixed by LBSs) on his mtn bike and it spent more time broken down and having to replace the expensive components after rides than mine ever did. Are Shimano 2300s really that bad or is it a case of people looking down on it cause its not "up to their high standards" (to put it in a little less blunt manner haha)? Honestly, what do you think of the three bikes I'm looking at? Keep in mind I am probably going to run it till the wheels fall off and i'll only do around 75 miles a week because of my work schedule. If the bikes are going to require a little more maintenance and care I don't see what the big deal is. Ive seen numerous cheap bikes like my mtn bike last a very long time with little maintenance. (sorry for the long post im a little frustrated)

  2. #2
    Cycling induced anoesis
    Reputation: PJ352's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    13,005
    If you're going to be doing general recreational/ fitness rides of about 75 miles weekly, any of these bikes will suite you. The Giant is a more relaxed type geo, allowing for a slightly more upright riding position and slightly slower (more predictably) handling. I would categorize the Trek as having race geo, although I've seen more aggressive examples - with the Specialized being one.

    Which you'll prefer is dependent on a number of factors, so standard advice is to visit the LBS's, get sized/ fitted to the bikes and head out on the roads for test rides. Focus on fit/ feel, ride and handling and whittle the field from there.

    As for the components, the Spec and Giant use Shimano's 2300 (8 speed) groupset, while the Trek uses Sora (9 speed). Except for the number of speeds, the differences are negligible, and since the the Giant uses a triple crankset, the 8/9 speed difference is not IMO a deal breaker. That aside, it's best to discuss your terrain and fitness with the LBS's, so they can recommend gearing that will best suite your needs.

    Re: the bikes, they're all top quality frames with limited lifetime warranties. Shimano's 2300 /Sora groupsets are entry level, but when properly set up/ tuned still perform well and should prove durable. What we gain when moving up to the higher end gear is generally lighter weight, a better finish and a level of refinement.

    Given how your thread reads (at least to me) you come across as a fairly mechanical type person who applies some sense to maintenance, so I think you'll be happy with any of these component groups.

    My only other observation are the wheelsets on the bikes. Depending on your weight, you may want to give some thought to Treks 24 spoke wheels. Generally speaking, they'll probably suite a rider up to the 175 lb. weight range, but the Spec and Giant's 32h wheels should prove more durable.

  3. #3
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    19
    I agree withPJ352 go ride each one. In doing so I discovered a better size for me. I started with testing the Defy due to people saying that it should be more comfortable due it's relaxed Geo. what I found for me the Specialized Allez elite felt better. The most Important feature is a bike shop who will take time to size you up.

  4. #4
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    7

    Smile

    Awesome thanks for the info. Much better info thamn what the LBSs gave me. I have been looking at the Allez because the more aggressive position would be better for the wind that blows along the river trail. Thanks again for the input guys. Any other input would be appreciated!

  5. #5
    Cycling induced anoesis
    Reputation: PJ352's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    13,005
    Quote Originally Posted by mountainbiker407 View Post
    Awesome thanks for the info. Much better info thamn what the LBSs gave me. I have been looking at the Allez because the more aggressive position would be better for the wind that blows along the river trail. Thanks again for the input guys. Any other input would be appreciated!
    Don't get me wrong, the Allez is a very nice bike, but I don't think I'd move it to the front of the pack based on aero positioning alone. Any of these bikes can be set up more aggressively by adjusting stem angle/ spacer setup. But beyond that, there are (your) anatomical constraints (mainly flexibility/ fitness) that a fitter will need to accommodate.

    Also, facing a headwind, our bodies (not our positioning) are the biggest - and literally the largest - physical factors in bucking the resistance. No matter your saddle to bar drop, you can always get 'more aero' by riding in the drops and bending/ tucking at your elbows. IMO/E this method beats setting up a bike for additional drop just to be used in headwinds, because the remainder of the time other bar positions can still be used comfortably - and that's an advantage of a drop bar bike.

  6. #6
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    19
    Now I am for sure not going to point to one bike over another as I believe after test riding 4 different bikes a couple times each that each bike would be best for someone. My comment is the biggest part is proper sizing and a LBS willings to work with ya. In my case I was actually a little intimidated by the Specialized because of the term more aggressive geo. In my mind that meant less comfortable for some one as new as I and working to get back into collage shape. For me though the bike just felt right. The big part might have been just the store who took more time to size me up. Honestly ride each one and ask questions till you find the right person who will get you properly sized. The only other suggestion would be after getting the best fit and feel is to get the best components you can honestly afford. It appears to me buying with the plan to upgrade is more costly then getting it right the first time. Not to say you won't grown in cycling and as such decide you need a better bike but if you could get as much as your budget allows may keep that day from coming too fast.

  7. #7
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: Mufasa's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    100
    I agree. Go ride each but I will say, the Trek is a good entry level bike.

  8. #8
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    18
    I am currently riding a 2012 Allez, and I have to applaud the stiffness of the frame. The Cassette is a bit noisy, and the wheels are on the heavy size (Alex S480), but for a trainer, I really like it. Also looks pretty cool, if you ask me!

  9. #9
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    19
    Derby which Allez do you have
    Last edited by Tx26257; 06-04-2012 at 08:38 PM. Reason: Typo

  10. #10
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    19
    I am also in the same position. I just road tour de cure as a charity ride on my singlespeed mountain bike and am ready to take a bite into road biking since I enjoyed the event so much. I am subscribing to this thread and hopefully also get some great feedback. As for the research, I have done it all comes down to the Specialized Allez Comp and Giant Defy 5. Time to test the bikes at various shop and see if I can get fitted properly.

  11. #11
    Cycling induced anoesis
    Reputation: PJ352's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    13,005
    Quote Originally Posted by ncruz408 View Post
    I am also in the same position. I just road tour de cure as a charity ride on my singlespeed mountain bike and am ready to take a bite into road biking since I enjoyed the event so much. I am subscribing to this thread and hopefully also get some great feedback. As for the research, I have done it all comes down to the Specialized Allez Comp and Giant Defy 5. Time to test the bikes at various shop and see if I can get fitted properly.
    I think you picked a good thread to read through. Given the bikes you're interested in, it should answer your questions.

    The bold statement is a good plan. I would add, shop for shops along with shopping for bikes. Hopefully, the shop you like best will carry the bike you like best.

  12. #12
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    22
    As a Trek 1.2 owner, I would share that the Sora groupset works great, but pay attention to how you shift down the cassette. You have to come out of the drops to shift to a more difficult gear (or down the cassette). For me, this was the number one reason I upgraded out of the 1.2 after less than a year.

  13. #13
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    19
    For Father's Day weekend, I was able to test the Trek 1.1 and Giant Defy 5. When I first tested the Trek 1.1, I felt comfortable and was like this bike may just be the one but after trying the Giant Defy 5, I had the biggest smile on my face. LOL, and this was coming from the wife's observation. Still doing some research and still would like to test out the Allez Compact..

  14. #14
    Cycling induced anoesis
    Reputation: PJ352's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    13,005
    Quote Originally Posted by ncruz408 View Post
    For Father's Day weekend, I was able to test the Trek 1.1 and Giant Defy 5. When I first tested the Trek 1.1, I felt comfortable and was like this bike may just be the one but after trying the Giant Defy 5, I had the biggest smile on my face. LOL, and this was coming from the wife's observation. Still doing some research and still would like to test out the Allez Compact..
    You're making good progress. I'd say if after riding the Allez you start questioning it versus the Defy, go back and ride the Giant while your memory of the Allez is fresh in your mind.

    By process of elimination, you'll get there, but remember to also consider the shops you like, because you'll likely be tapping them as a resource, post-purchase.

  15. #15
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    20
    I don't mean to hijack this thread, but what are people's opinions on the Fuji Roubaix 2.0 ($849.00)? I believe it's maybe $100-150 more than the Trek 1.1 ($700). I believe in terms of components, it's mainly Tiagra throughout.

    I liked both bikes equally, but was never really properly fitted. The Fuji was at PB and the Trek at a LBS. I have not visited any stores with Giant and Specialized. I am similar to the OP, but maybe 100 miles a week with hopes to be able to ride longer with a road bike. Just know the Specialized and Trek are pretty popular and highly rated, but was hoping to get some opinions on the Fuji Roubaix at PB. Thank you!
    Last edited by madflava54; 07-01-2012 at 09:53 AM.

  16. #16
    Cycling induced anoesis
    Reputation: PJ352's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    13,005
    If you fit the general description of the OP and ncruz408, I suggest taking what's been offered in this thread under advisement. Basically, it comes down to their being a number of nice bikes on the market in many price ranges.

    Finding the *right* one, based on intended uses and fit (among other factors) requires you to visit some shops, discuss those intended uses/ goals, get sized/ fitted to bikes meeting those requirements, and take some test rides - out on the roads.

    Test ride both race and relaxed geo bikes, focusing on fit/ feel, ride and handling. As examples, the Fuji and Trek would be classified as race, while bikes like the Giant Defy and Specialized Secteur are relaxed.

    As you go through this process, shop for shops along with bikes. The shops that take the time to ask questions (and answer yours), emphasizes the importance of fit and test rides, gets extra points with me.

    To directly answer your question, as long as it suites your intended uses and fits well, the Fuji Roubaix is a fine bike, but so are some Treks, Giants, Specialized.... so in an effort to make an educated decision, expose yourself to some others. If you go back to the Fuji, great, but then at least you'll know specifically why and how it trumped the others.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT ROADBIKEREVIEW

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2020 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.