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  1. #26
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    I know a guy who has an older version of the Motobecane Ti bike, can't recall when he bought it but maybe 6 years ago. Anyway it did weigh about 3/4ths of a pound to a pound MORE than they said it would, but that's not a big deal. At the time it was a good deal for a TI bike, and he still rides it a lot today and never had any issues with it. Not sure if the newer models have kept up with the quality of back then but the prices have certainly gone up to the point where I'm not sure you could get a similar deal from someone else. I know that you can get a Reilly Gradient fully equipped with 105 for about $400 more than a Motobecane, but the Reilly would have more resale value if that's important to you. Otherwise, and again this based on a 6 year old or so Moto, that from what I've seen of it, and from what my friend talks about it, it's a great bike. The only weak spot on the Moto is the fork, the stock fork is a bit flexy which I assume that was done for comfort since most people buying from Bikes Direct are not going to be fast mountain burners; so one could change out the fork after some time to say a Envy 2.0 that would be a lot stiffer. Again though after 6 years of a lot mountain riding (we both live in California) he hasn't done anything to it other than pedals, saddle and of course tires, chains and one set of cables, he hasn't even changed out the wheels which according to most people that's where the Moto lacked the most back when he got his, the new version uses DT Swiss wheels, not sure if they are better or not then older models wheels but DT Swiss makes decent stuff. Actually the included pedals and saddle were the worse he swapped those out fast. But the welds look really well done, the frame has a shiny texture to it, it use to be made by ORA which is a highly recognized Asian TI builder, I'm not sure if the new ones are still made by ORA. If you buy one I think all you need is the Ultegra level, but that's up to you of course, but to go with DA is more for racing and they aren't quite as robust as Ultegra which means you could be replacing stuff some time down the road and DA replacement parts are not cheap (that statement I just made will cause an uproar, but I'll stay out it).

    LBS isn't going to save you any money over labor charges or parts costs if you buy a bike directly from them vs from someone else, I've around bikes and LBS's for a long time and they don't discrimate like that. My friend with the Moto took his bike down to the LBS to have them put it together, make sure everything was properly lubed and adjust everything and the whole bill came to about $70...that's not bad, I had known the guy was going to buy the Moto I would have done it for him for free, but he surprised me with it. The LBS even offered to do a profit for him which he had done.

    As far as an ill fitting bike goes, you know what? these are off the shelf bike sizes, just as LBS's carry, most LBS employees are young college kids who really don't know how to fit a bike to you other than ask for your height and the away they go hoping they have something close to right size in stock for you; crying out loud you can get the same information at Bikes Direct website where it says sizing chart, look up your size and there you go. Off the shelf bikes at an LBS will have the same issue as a Bikes Direct bike in size problems, like is the stem too short or too long for you? A stock bike from an LBS will come with whatever stem was supplied by the manufacture and not the LBS, in fact you won't even know at an LBS if the stem is too long or too short until you had the bike a while. I've known people who went to LBS's to buy a bike and later found out the bike shop sold them the wrong size bike that didn't even match the height of the person to the frame size! So really? If making sure you get the absolute correct size for you is extremely important then go the custom frame build route where the frame builder will have you measure several different areas of your body parts and will design a bike frame custom made to fit you, and even then you still might need a profit done!

    All of this don't buy on the internet is all scare tactics, people are scared that you're going to run a LBS out of business because you didn't buy from them...get over it guys, we live in capitalistic society and that type of society generates competition and things change which is why Sears can't keep up because they couldn't change, so should we all race down to Sears to keep them in business? NO, the same is true with an LBS. LBS's will NEVER disappear from the face of the earth unlike Sears, they offer a needed service and will be around a very long time. They still garnish a huge percentage of all bicycle and cycling related sales over any other type of internet stores or big box stores.

    Off the side a bit; but Sears had the chance to become what Amazon is today, the idea was promoted to Sears but Sears didn't think it would work, Amazon was formed about a month or two after Sears thought it wouldn't work. I find that odd since Sears started out as a catalog store I would have thought they would have grabbed the Amazon concept full hog, but instead they rejected the idea, and the rest is history and so is Sears.

  2. #27
    pmf
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    Great Scott ... that's a longass post.

  3. #28
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    OP is probably long gone but a few things about this thread hurt my head.

    Okay, maybe there aren't enough details to really judge, but posting in Beginner forum about shopping for your first road bike and already knowing you want a 9100 or eTAP sub-17 pound bike... my guess is the 1 pound being freaked out about is going to end up being meaningless. Anyway, I think the weight obsession in this case would go away after some test rides of bikes at a shop (real rides, not a lap around the parking lot).

    "I thought I'd get a significant weight savings with a larger budget"... all a matter of perspective, what is your definition of significant and what is your definition of larger budget? Price of weight savings is certainly not linear when it comes to bikes. And $3000 is "bike of my dreams" for some and cheap/average for others.

    I'm pretty BD-neutral, never have bought from them. I have one friend with one of these Ti Motobecanes and he swears by it, it's definitely a nice ride, and I don't know the exact weight but his is definitely sub-16 if I remember what he said about it. Anyway, listing "no service" as a knock when you're buying online is sort of like, "duh". It's not long before you have to pay for most service anyway after a free tune-up or two... and most LBS are going to charge the same price regardless of where you got the bike. Find a shop where you like the mechanics and they like you, where the bike originally came from is not going to matter.
    Last edited by jetdog9; 3 Weeks Ago at 12:30 PM.

  4. #29
    pmf
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    Your last comment is spot on. The "free" tune ups bike shops offer are worth what you pay for them. If there's a serious problem, it won't be free. I have a bike shop I've been frequenting for years. I know most of the mechanics (and none of the sales people) by name. I like them. They like me. At least it seems that way. A lot of times I'm having some kind of issue and I take the bike in and they fix it for free. I've never bought a bike at the shop because they don't sell the type of bikes I like. I do buy stuff there and whenever I need to have a bike built up, I pay them to do it. My wife rides a lot too and I'm tasked with taking care of her bikes as well.

  5. #30
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    I have friends who bought bikes from bike shops with those free tuneups for life type of deals and some had them for the first year only, but regardless I took my friend and her bike to shop to have her free tuneup done and it took the mechanic all but 5 minutes to do, so what's the shop really out? Another time she went in there and it took I think 15 minutes and charged her for a chain and cables which I thought neither were done for yet but the mechanic convinced her she needed that done every year, but it cost my friend money because she chose to do the recommended repairs even though I tried to tell her it wasn't necessary, but it was her bike not mine. So I think too that those free services don't turn out so free, it's just a way to get you in the door and try to replace something. So I'm not a fan of free tuneups, I can take it or leave it, it's not a selling point to me.

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