What's the scoop on Tommasso?
Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. #1

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    1

    What's the scoop on Tommasso?

    It seems that you can get an awfully good deal on these bikes, albeit online.

    Are they solid bikes or a bit sketchy?

    It seems there has to be some reason they aren't mentioned too often here.

  2. #2
    Pedal Master
    Reputation: real stonie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    2,511
    I was considering a Tomasso, Motobecane and Windsor, but ultimatley decided if it sounds too good to be true, it probably was. I neded up with a Trek from my LBS. I just had an issue with vague websites that gave very little information about the product and even less info about the "company" selling them.

  3. #3
    Bacon!
    Reputation: Ridgetop's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    9,190
    Good enough company but you need to be 100% sure the bike is going to fit you. It's a big hassel with any mail order company if the bike doesn't fit and you end up unhappy with it. I usually give the same advice to anyone without a whole lot of experience with roadbikes - try to buy something you can ride beforehand. It's not fool proof but you'll know what you're getting whether it be from a LBS or used bike from some individual.

    My experiences have been mixed with mail order bikes. My latest one was actually an MTB and I have been annoyed with some of the geometry on it but didn't want to go with the hassel of returning it. I've known others who have mailordered and been thrilled with their roadbikes. Just depends on what you know I guess.
    “To kill, you must know your enemy, and in this case my enemy is a varmint. And a varmint will never quit — ever. They’re like the Viet Cong — Varmint Cong. So you have to fall back on superior intelligence and superior firepower.”

  4. #4

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Posts
    476

    price difference

    Quote Originally Posted by real stonie
    I was considering a Tomasso, Motobecane and Windsor, but ultimatley decided if it sounds too good to be true, it probably was. I neded up with a Trek from my LBS. I just had an issue with vague websites that gave very little information about the product and even less info about the "company" selling them.

    The difference in price between a Tomasso, Motobecane, or Windsor compared to a Trek or Specializedat the Ultegra level can be $1000 -- that is a lot of money to most people. In addition, the internet bikes tend to use more name brand parts - better stems, wheels, etc

  5. #5
    Home Brew User!
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    2,810
    Quote Originally Posted by kikos_ndakwa
    It seems that you can get an awfully good deal on these bikes, albeit online.

    Are they solid bikes or a bit sketchy?

    It seems there has to be some reason they aren't mentioned too often here.
    Most any of the $1000 or so bikes out there are bound to be very good and serve your needs.

    One of the Key players with RScycles posted here a while back and they seem to be a very solid company. I've talked with them on the phone about a MTB but decided not to buy anything at the time. They were very helpful.

    If you are pretty confident about size/fit give them a call and talk about their opinion on fit for you.

    If you do buy one be sure to give some feed back here after you have 500 miles or so on it.
    Joined the other team in the name of the economy

  6. #6

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    79
    Good solid bikes, for a great price. 7055 Aluminum frames.
    Shimano Sora or Tiagra or 105 group for the lower cost models.
    Alex Aluminum wheels. Carbon fork. Truvativ cranks.

    All of the same or comparable components on 'brand' name bikes sold at
    the local shops. It is not too good to be true in fact, it is what is;
    A good deal, without the lifetime tuneup, shop fitting, and good will
    a few shops may have to offer. I believe the money saved on the bike
    outweighs the so called perks you may get at the local shop.

    But, it is for the would be buyer to decide. If you really want to save
    money, and feel comfortable doing the research on fit, and size
    and what components come equipped with the different models,
    then this is the way to go. For a new comer, it is a great way to
    get your feet wet and start cycling without spending a $1000 or more
    on an entry level bike. If you are not comfortable buying online,
    and have the extra money to spend, then by all means, buy from the local shop.

    I have two bikes now, both bought from different online sellers. Both well below
    the cost of comparable bicycles. I saved anywhere from $1,500 to $1,650
    in total, which...is another complete bike. Buying online or from internet
    only bike sellers is not a terrible or wrong, or sketchy thing to do.

    If you perform due diligence, and know what you are buying, it can
    be an excellent way to get your first, second or back up bike for a
    significant amount of savings.
    Passion. Ferocity. Realization.

    For all the complaining, "I know more than you" voices about descending- <i>fast</i>; You would have never made it in motorcycle roadracing. In my 8 seasons on the track, I never heard the constant outcry from riders- it was too fast...or too dangerous. It is what it is, and a <i>choice</i> to do so.

    To see 'real' racers in action-
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8Zjv0ZHvFIQ
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gNxJrB_8gHk

  7. #7

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Posts
    476

    better to e-mail

    Quote Originally Posted by Lifelover
    Most any of the $1000 or so bikes out there are bound to be very good and serve your needs.

    One of the Key players with RScycles posted here a while back and they seem to be a very solid company. I've talked with them on the phone about a MTB but decided not to buy anything at the time. They were very helpful.

    If you are pretty confident about size/fit give them a call and talk about their opinion on fit for you.

    If you do buy one be sure to give some feed back here after you have 500 miles or so on it.
    My advise is e-mail them your questions and requests for opinions
    that why their answers are in writting and have what we used to call a 'paper trail'

    No matter who you talk to on the phone or in a store - they are room comfortable 'spiining' their product beyond the truth than they are in writing

    A good way to test this theory, is ask any guy in a store what a bike weighes
    then after he answers - ask him to put that in writing

  8. #8
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    45
    I know a guy that picked up the lower model that was on close out for $399 and free shipping. He didn't have much choice on the color, but the bike is nice. I think it is great for the price.

    One would have to spend a lot more than that for the same thing from most LBS.

    I wish I would have picked one up for my wife.
    Now after saying that, he did not get the correct size that he probably should have. This is mainly because of his lack of research in to what size he really needed. There is also a difference in how some companies measure there frames.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT ROADBIKEREVIEW

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2020 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.