Bikes that best represent the 1990s
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  1. #1
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    Bikes that best represent the 1990s

    Yes, I know that if I ask "What's the best road bike from the 1990s," I could be requesting a tall order. But I think anything from Masi, Cinelli, Pinarello or Colnago best represent the 1980s - at least for me.

    For the '90s, I'm clueless. Tell me which bikes best represent the '90s, or at least which bike was your favorite.

    Personally, I like the Colnago Technos. It's one bike I've experienced from that time period.

  2. #2
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    Kestrel pretty much introduced carbon in the early 90's, that was pretty momentous.

  3. #3
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    1990s were the years of americans: Cannondale, Trek.

  4. #4
    Lemur-ing
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    Mercx?
    Quote Originally Posted by tconrady
    If I can get some more tomorrow.... I thought it'd grow on me but I'm not feelin' it....wait..
    Allez United!

    Glory, Glory Man United, and the Reds go marching on!

  5. #5

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    Litespeed and Ti. Oh, and my Paramount OS, made by those fine lads in Waterford.
    Hit me again, Ike, and put some stank on it.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by uzziefly
    Mercx?
    I'm thinking around 80's ... maybe 70's

  7. #7

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    You gotta throw in Merlin - come on, we all wanted one and dare I say we even might have used some anodized purple parts?

    Kestrel was all carbon and that can't be ignored

    Cannondale showed it was a great crit bike and then in the mid 90s proved to everyone you could ride aluminum in a grand tour as it handily won the giro

    Merckx, Colnago, Bianchi were all enviable bikes, too.

    To me the coolest team of the 90s, though, was Word Perfect. Dark Blue jersey and shorts, dark blue colnagos and dark blue volvo wagons - they still look cool even all these years later.

  8. #8
    toomanybikes
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    Quote Originally Posted by rlim
    I'm thinking around 80's ... maybe 70's
    I'm thinking your thinker needs work.

  9. #9
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    Merlin sounds right--Titanium was the big metal of the 90s.

    As for carbon, Kestrel never got traction among roadies because of their Tri groupies. Carbon for roadies was Look-more late 80s but trickled into the American market early 90s with their KG frames.

    Aluminum was also reworked by Jim Felt into a pretty slick bike (maybe called the Answer?). It was black matte and pretty cool.

  10. #10
    toomanybikes
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    Everything came together in the 90's.

    Steels were being re-worked in wonderful ways and used to create MAX tubing as was used in the wonderful MX Leader and new steel alloys such as Neuron and other oversize tubes came to the fore.

    Aluminium had moved beyond the likes of Vitus and was starting to figure prominently in high level bikes, some great examples from the likes of Pinarello or Colnago.

    Titanium was a big deal and there were lots of bikes being sold under all sorts of names even though they were made by Litespeed; Merckx, Bianchi, BAsso, etc.

    Carbon was starting to show, but didn't really make a splash until the close of the decade.

    The 1990's were a decade for the metals, all sorts of wonderful products that are great to this day, some of the best steel bikes ever are from the 90's.

  11. #11
    Lemur-ing
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    Quote Originally Posted by toomanybikes
    I'm thinking your thinker needs work.
    I think Treks really were a good representation if it were based on the American market perhaps.

    I dunno, I just somehow think the mercx is around for a long time and represents a long history.
    Quote Originally Posted by tconrady
    If I can get some more tomorrow.... I thought it'd grow on me but I'm not feelin' it....wait..
    Allez United!

    Glory, Glory Man United, and the Reds go marching on!

  12. #12
    toomanybikes
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    Quote Originally Posted by uzziefly
    I think Treks really were a good representation if it were based on the American market perhaps.

    I dunno, I just somehow think the mercx is around for a long time and represents a long history.
    Eddy MErckx did not start making bicycles until approximately 1980.

    There were many wonderful bicycles bearing his name all through the '90's as there are now. They represent a past age no more than Colnago or Trek.

    Your beloved Lance Armstrong won his World Championship on a "heavy" steel bike built by Merckx. I'm pretty sure that was in the '90's??

    Trek didn't become a "deal" until 1999 / 2005 era.

  13. #13
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    i remember looking at litespeeds with a certain sort of awe.... i also really lusted after a klein back then.

    i was more into mtb back then, but cannondale and the head-shok designs were the height of coolness in my opinion.

  14. #14
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    Wink 3 important bikes

    I think there were 3 bikes that stood above all others in shaping the 1990s:

    1. Colnago C40. Biggest carbon racing bike of the pro peleton in the 1990s. Great bike that the riders loved. Big pedigree of race wins. Way ahead of its time. Hardly needed to be changed for years.

    2. Litespeed Ultimate. Titanium really came of age in the 1990s with a lot of different makes. Litespeed really lead the way in the public's mind as the most visible and popular line.

    3. Cannondale CAAD series. First aluminum bikes in the pro peleton (after Vitus' attempt at simply substituting aluminum for steel) and the first US brand to sponsor a European pro team. At first, Euro bike makers didn't believe they would be any good and expected Cannondale's sponsorship of Saeco to flop. Within two years, all would have top-drawer aluminum models and aluminum would become the predominant material in the pro peleton until replaced by carbon in the 2000s.

    P.S. I'm posting icons for my son.....no message is correct without funny icons.

    Last edited by bikemoore; 03-22-2008 at 09:57 AM.

  15. #15
    Lemur-ing
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    Quote Originally Posted by toomanybikes
    Eddy MErckx did not start making bicycles until approximately 1980.

    There were many wonderful bicycles bearing his name all through the '90's as there are now. They represent a past age no more than Colnago or Trek.

    Your beloved Lance Armstrong won his World Championship on a "heavy" steel bike built by Merckx. I'm pretty sure that was in the '90's??

    Trek didn't become a "deal" until 1999 / 2005 era.
    Yeah so I was kinda right bout Merckx being a 90's bike perhaps.

    Oh yeah, you're right, Treks are more of a 2000 onwards bike.
    Quote Originally Posted by tconrady
    If I can get some more tomorrow.... I thought it'd grow on me but I'm not feelin' it....wait..
    Allez United!

    Glory, Glory Man United, and the Reds go marching on!

  16. #16
    Big is relative
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    I entered the 90's riding a Raleigh 753 with dura ace. I rode that until 1993 when I bought a polished Litespeed Classic with a kestrel fork and moved the parts over and went STI. Cannondale from 1996 to 1999.

    Cannondales were the bang for the buck choice of the 90's IMHO.

    1999 was the year I bought the Merckx MXL and went Campy.

    I never owned a bike with neon yellow, green, or orange paint but I rode with plenty of people who did.
    Retired sailor

  17. #17
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    Colnago C-40s ridden by Mapei.

    Tri color fade Lemonds ridden by Z.

    Merckx ridden by Motorola and Telekom.

  18. #18
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    Those tri-color Lemonds were made by Calfee. One of my innovator of the 90's picks.
    Litespeed bringing ti to the masses.
    Trek and the OCLV line up.

    My tigged 853 Steelman single speed ruled 1999.

  19. #19
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    The 90s were all about mountain bikes--but I would say it was the decade for titanium on the road. Lightspeed was the most widely recognized name, but Merlin made better bikes. You could include either--or both.

    Big tube aluminum (Cannondale 3.0, Klein Quantum) made their first big splash in the late 80s. Kestrel was also late 80s with the 4000. I think both of those should make the 80s category--but not the 90s. If you wanted aluminum to make a 90s list--I'd pick a Klein because of Seinfeld, or Cannondale for the pro sponsorship.

    Colnago did seem to have the best handle on carbon with the C40, and maybe the Kestrel 200SC for early 90s. Most carbon fiber bikes were terrible--I'm sure Trek would rather be included in the 2000s for their OCLV, than the 90s for their terrible lugged carbon flex frames.

    We did see a lot of creative manipulation of steel--and I'd include it because it was also the decade of steel's last hurrah (at least for the masses). I'd pick a Merckx, Pinarello, DeRosa or maybe a Lemond with Reynolds 853 or Columbus MAX or other special steel tubing.

    Really, though, if I was making a timeline of bicycles--I think I'd just hang a sign that said "Gone Mountain Biking" because it reduced the road bike market spotlight for nearly the entire decade.

  20. #20
    toomanybikes
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    Quote Originally Posted by uzziefly
    Yeah so I was kinda right bout Merckx being a 90's bike perhaps.
    .
    Clearly, I haven't explained it correctly.

  21. #21
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    My contribution:

    Coors Light Lemond - Dura ace 8 speed with down tube shifters:



    Merlin - Dura Ace 8 speed with STI



    Lemond SLX with Campy Record/Chorus 8 speed



    Trek 2300 with Ultegra 8 Speed STI - Note the ultra cool carbon fiber front triangle and aluminum rear triangle.


  22. #22
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    1. Trek OCLV
    2. CAAD
    3. Litespeed - Can you say Colorado Cyclist? Used to drool over those catalogs as a kid.

    Also had some bizarre, yet classic incarnations of the bike (to the delight of the tri-geeks):

    Zipp 2001, Softride...

  23. #23
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    That Coors Light Lemond is effin sweet!!

  24. #24
    Rollin' Stones
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    A 90's party? I'm the life of it!
    Attached Images Attached Images
    I want rustlers, cutthroats, murderers, bounty hunters, desperados, mugs, pugs, thugs, nitwits, halfwits, dimwits, vipers, snipers, con-men, Indian agents, Mexican bandits, muggers, buggerers, bushwhackers, hornswogglers, horse thieves, bull-dykes, train robbers, bank robbers, ass-kickers, sh**-kickers, and Methodists!

  25. #25
    Cpark
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    Ride of Indurain, Alex Zulle, Jan, Bjarnes Riis... - Pinarello.

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