Buying a new bike with a $3000 budget. Torn on a few choices.
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  1. #1
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    Buying a new bike with a $3000 budget. Torn on a few choices.

    Hi all,

    I've been riding a cheap road bike and would like to get something a lot nicer and get fitted properly at a bike shop. I'm 5'10" and I'm in my 40's and I don't want to compete in races. The most important thing for me is comfort and upgradability of components. My max budget for the bike is $3000.

    So far, I've ridden the following bikes.

    Scott Solace 15 Disc (54cm)
    It felt very comfortable. The disc brakes were responsive. This size of the bike felt right to me. This bike is on sale for $2750.
    Specialized Roubaix SL4 Comp (52cm)
    The dealer didn't have a 54cm for me to try. It felt light but a bit small. Comfort was the same as the Scott. The rim brakes worked fine.
    Specialized Roubaix SL4 Expert Disc UDI2 (52cm)
    This bike is not in my price range but I just wanted to try the electronic shifting, which was very responsive and reduced a lot of chain noise. I really liked Di2.

    Here's my dilemma. Specialized offers a Roubaix Comp UDI2 which is $3000. It doesn't offer as many Ultegra components as the Scott Solace but it has Di2. I'm torn because I'd like to have disc brakes (I'm used to them) but I'd also love to have Di2. But I can't have both since the bike will be way out of my price range.

    What do you all think I should do? Should I get the Scott Solace and upgrade to Di2 in the future or should I get the Roubaix Comp UDI2?

    Also, what other bikes should I consider?

    Many thanks!

    novemberhotel

  2. #2
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    Buy what you want now with everything on your wish list.

    Life is too short to penny pinch.

  3. #3
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    If you really want disc, get a bike setup that way. You need to make that choice when you buy the frame.
    The Felt Z3 is close to your budget. Give the 6800 mechanical shifters a try, after a few thousand miles, upgrade to DI2 if you still want it.
    Also, make sure of the frame size before you buy. As you say, for an endurance bike 52 sounds small for 5"10"

  4. #4
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    Skip the discs unless you live somewhere where it rains, a LOT. You're better off spending your money on a good frame and good components. Disc standards are still evolving and with luck everyone will realize they have more downsides (weight, less aero, noisy, more complicated, etc.) than upsides (modulation, that's it) and they will go away.
    Well, you know, that's just, like, your opinion man. - The Dude

  5. #5
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    There is no need for Disc brakes on a road bike and you will look like a total dork.
    Don't limit yourself to Specialized and Scott. Other brands to consider:

    Cannondale (love mine)
    Trek
    BMC
    Giant
    Fuji

    If you are going to spend $3K take some time to consider and test ride all the options.

  6. #6
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    Also consider Felt they have some of the best value for the dollar out there. Google for Lennard Zinn's article on why Felt has some of the best frame tech in the market right now. My wife got a full Ultegra (mechanical) F3 last New Year's week for just under $3K. Ui2 is nice but mechanical 6800 is pretty damn smooth and you can always upgrade later. Spend your $$ on the frame.
    Well, you know, that's just, like, your opinion man. - The Dude

  7. #7
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    "upgrade later" is no way to save money. It's good way to waste it though. Either get what you want now or learn to live without/with something else is what I'd do. Electric/non electric/disc/calipers....that stuff is way overrated. Once out there pedaling non of that stuff has an impact in enjoyment IMO. It all works.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jay Strongbow View Post
    "upgrade later" is no way to save money. Either get what you want now or learn to live without/with something else...
    Good advice from a wise member.

  9. #9
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    Trek Emonda SL6?

  10. #10
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    I would suggest taking a look at Bikesdirect. I haven't bought any bikes from them, but some of the bikes looks pretty good. One bike in particular that seems good I found for $3000, is this

    Save Up to 60% OFf Shimano Dura Ace DA9000 Road Bikes | Titanium Road Bikes | Roadbikes - Motobecane Le Champion Team Ti

    You won't get the care and service buying from here, that you would get from buying from the bike shop. However, the prices are much lower.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by polloloco51 View Post
    I would suggest taking a look at Bikesdirect. I haven't bought any bikes from them, but some of the bikes looks pretty good. One bike in particular that seems good I found for $3000, is this

    Save Up to 60% OFf Shimano Dura Ace DA9000 Road Bikes | Titanium Road Bikes | Roadbikes - Motobecane Le Champion Team Ti

    You won't get the care and service buying from here, that you would get from buying from the bike shop. However, the prices are much lower.
    That's a really good price but I'd rather spend a bit more and buy it from my LBS. Thanks for the suggestion though!

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jay Strongbow View Post
    "upgrade later" is no way to save money. It's good way to waste it though. Either get what you want now or learn to live without/with something else is what I'd do. Electric/non electric/disc/calipers....that stuff is way overrated. Once out there pedaling non of that stuff has an impact in enjoyment IMO. It all works.
    Where the heck do you come up with that advice? Exactly the opposite of what you'll read pretty much everywhere else. So you'd buy a lugged Walmart frame with DA9000 over a Cervelo R5 with 5800? Crazy talk.
    Well, you know, that's just, like, your opinion man. - The Dude

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by OldChipper View Post
    Where the heck do you come up with that advice? Exactly the opposite of what you'll read pretty much everywhere else. So you'd buy a lugged Walmart frame with DA9000 over a Cervelo R5 with 5800? Crazy talk.
    Thats not the thing, it's more you want an R5 with DA9000 but buy one with 5800 with the intention of upgrading everytinh to 9000 when you have the money, it's cheaper to buy the 9000 bike in the first place, than upgrade to it later.
    All the gear and no idea

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by OldChipper View Post
    Where the heck do you come up with that advice? Exactly the opposite of what you'll read pretty much everywhere else. So you'd buy a lugged Walmart frame with DA9000 over a Cervelo R5 with 5800? Crazy talk.
    How you got that out of what I actually said is a complete mystery to me so I'm not sure what to say but........no. And what mik_git said.

  15. #15
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    You are looking for the most popular type of bike on the road, the road endurance race bike, so you have a number of really good options out there (every major manufacturer makes a good one basically). Discs are fine, they are here to stay and you have more wheel upgrade options being produced every day. Are they necessary? Not really, but a number of people prefer them for riding in the rain and gook. They do come with a weight penalty of at least 1lb though if you care about that. I would also say, start by reading mm9's recent post on serious road cycling one year later. It contains some really sound advice.

    Regarding specific bikes, I like all of the options you listed, but a number of guys on here argue that the Roubaix SL4 is more race than comfort these days. I would really recommend testing one and adding in the Giant Defy, Cannondale Synapse, and Trek Domane to your list. I tested the Roubaix, the Domane, and Synapse and liked them all. The Domane was easily the most comfortable. The Roubaix felt the most like a race bike. The current Synapse won basically every award out there when it was released. It's that good. Some folks like the BMC Granfondo a lot as well. The Bianchi Infinito CV was praised a bunch when it was launched too, but it's pretty pricey.

    All of the adventure bikes that hit the stage in a big way last year may be a nice option for you as well (Diverge, Search, etc.). They have a similar geometry, but have additional room for wider tires/wheels. The downside is that they can be a bit heavier.

    Regardless of which way you decide to go, test rides and a good fit session will eventually lead you to the right bike. Fit is extremely important, so don't take it lightly. You can work the other things out. Also, don't get to caught up on components. Just get the bike that fits your body and budget the best out of the ones you like. The rest often doesn't end up being as significant as it appears to be right now.

    You may be able to get both Di2 and discs in your budget with brands like Giant, Felt, Norco, or Fuji. All are good bike manufacturers as well.
    Last edited by Rashadabd; 11-27-2015 at 07:40 AM.
    Every climb has its end, for verily with difficulty there is relief...

  16. #16
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    These are getting close and are probably a couple of hundred dollars cheaper in the shop:

    http://www.cannondale.com/en/USA/Bik...9-d0d717b8725a

    http://www.cannondale.com/en/USA/Bik...9-d0d717b8725a
    Last edited by Rashadabd; 11-26-2015 at 06:55 AM.
    Every climb has its end, for verily with difficulty there is relief...

  17. #17
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    This is very close and has a lot of what you want:

    Z3 Disc - Felt Bicycles

    Here's the Norco bikes:

    Valence Carbon Disc - Endurance - Endurance - Road - Bikes - Norco Bicycles
    Every climb has its end, for verily with difficulty there is relief...

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jay Strongbow View Post
    "upgrade later" is no way to save money. It's good way to waste it though. Either get what you want now or learn to live without/with something else is what I'd do. Electric/non electric/disc/calipers....that stuff is way overrated. Once out there pedaling non of that stuff has an impact in enjoyment IMO. It all works.
    Couldn't agree more. Far better to stretch your budget now and get what you really want than be left with the constant nagging of buyer's remorse that seems to infect so many. People buy new bikes and then immediately ask "what should I upgrade?" You're left with a box of perfectly good parts that probably would have served you just as well and you waste a lot of $$.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by mik_git View Post
    Thats not the thing, it's more you want an R5 with DA9000 but buy one with 5800 with the intention of upgrading everytinh to 9000 when you have the money, it's cheaper to buy the 9000 bike in the first place, than upgrade to it later.
    Well yeah, in that case, I agree. Components are definitely cheaper when purchased OEM on the bike, but if I HAD to choose between a better frame with cheaper components and a middle-of-the-road frame with better components, I'd definitely go with the better frame. For a lot of folks, it's about cash-flow (or spouse approval ). You can upgrade individual components a little bit at a time vs. dropping $3-5K in one chunk on a better frame at some point in the future.
    Well, you know, that's just, like, your opinion man. - The Dude

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rashadabd View Post
    This is very close and has a lot of what you want:

    Z3 Disc - Felt Bicycles

    Here's the Norco bikes:

    Valence Carbon Disc - Endurance - Endurance - Road - Bikes - Norco Bicycles
    Yep, except ditch the disc and go with an F3. But yeah, if you have to have disc the Z3 is a really good value.
    Well, you know, that's just, like, your opinion man. - The Dude

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rashadabd View Post
    Regarding specific bikes, I like all of the options you listed, but a number of guys on here argue that the Roubaix SL4 is more race than comfort these days. I would really recommend testing one and adding in the Giant Defy, Cannondale Synapse, and Trek Domane to your list. I tested the Roubaix, the Domane, and Synapse and liked them all. The Domane was easily the most comfortable. The Roubaix felt the most like a race bike. The current Synapse won basically every award out there when it was released. It's that good. Some folks like the BMC Granfondo a lot as well. The Bianchi Infinito CV was praised a bunch when it was launched as too, but it's pretty pricey.

    Regardless of which way you decide to go, test rides and a good fit session will eventually lead you to the right bike. Fit is extremely important, so don't take it lightly. You can work the other things out. Also, don't get to caught up on components. Just get the bike that fits your body and budget the best out of the ones you like. The rest often doesn't end up being as significant as it appears to be right now.

    You may be able to get both Di2 and discs in your budget with brands Giant, Felt, Norco, or Fuji. All are good bike manufacturers as well.
    Best advice yet. I own an SL4 Roubaix and concur that it's more race than comfort; however, the CG-R seat post takes a lot of harshness out of the ride, and at 80+ miles, I can definitely tell a different between my Roubaix (with a standard seatpost) and my R3 in terms of comfort.

    The Domane is a solid and comfortable bike, but has less road feel than is *my* preference. YMMV.

    But, yes, fit is the MOST important as well as what *you* like in a bike in terms of comfort, steering, responsiveness, etc.
    Well, you know, that's just, like, your opinion man. - The Dude

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by OldChipper View Post
    Best advice yet. I own an SL4 Roubaix and concur that it's more race than comfort; however, the CG-R seat post takes a lot of harshness out of the ride, and at 80+ miles
    +1, except OWNED as in sold. I already had [and still have] a 2008 Scott Addict LTD and the SL4 I have some definite opinions on. Just search my user name and SL4 if you want to see all my comments.

    CR-R post and 27mm Pave Vittoria tires and the SL4 still rode less compliant than my HMX Addict with 23mm tires. I'd say the CG-R is a must but that it is not night and day as much as just better. I am 215lb FWIW.

    Choose wisely, research and extended test ride if you can in case you feel the same way I did. It may well be exactly what you want and are looking for. Browsing will show I am not alone in my opinions FYI. Thankfully I did not sell off the Scott to get it, as it is still my #1 [try to] go fast machine....

    Good luck...
    Quote Originally Posted by Robt57/Me!
    Everything you read that I post is just '1' guy's opinion, try to sort it all out best you can. ;) I will try to add value in my posts, if I miss the mark please let me know using a little decorum.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by OldChipper View Post
    For a lot of folks, it's about cash-flow (or spouse approval ).
    Spouse approval. F**k that. That would make me nuts.

    When the spouse brings home the cash, then she can dictate how it's spent. Until then, I'll make my own decisions about how to spend discretionary income.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by tvad View Post
    Spouse approval. F**k that. That would make me nuts.

    When the spouse brings home the cash, then she can dictate how it's spent. Until then, I'll make my own decisions about how to spend discretionary income.

    And you are on which number wife currently? ;O ;)


    And yes, this is a rhetorical question and a joke...
    Quote Originally Posted by Robt57/Me!
    Everything you read that I post is just '1' guy's opinion, try to sort it all out best you can. ;) I will try to add value in my posts, if I miss the mark please let me know using a little decorum.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by tvad View Post
    Spouse approval. F**k that. That would make me nuts.

    When the spouse brings home the cash, then she can dictate how it's spent. Until then, I'll make my own decisions about how to spend discretionary income.
    Says the single guy.... Just kidding.
    Every climb has its end, for verily with difficulty there is relief...

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