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  1. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by cxwrench View Post
    It's now time to find a new shop. Or that shop needs to find some new mechanics. That's pretty much inexcusable.
    I know you're 'close to the owner' and 'This isn't a bad bike shop - they're pretty great mechanics there, and very honest, so I don't think they're making stuff up. ' But the evidence here suggests the contrary. I have no doubt you'll keep going back to this place and will repeatedly have problems with your bike because these guys are incompetent. You think they really called someone at Campagnolo? Who? Campagnolo USA is a marketing firm. A rear derailer is a rear derailer This is a bicycle, not an automobile. If you like that shop so much, there's nothing wrong with buying stuff from it and taking your bike elsewhere for service. I occasionally buy stuff at Performance, but I'd never let the kids working there touch my bike.

  2. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by pmf View Post
    I know you're 'close to the owner' and 'This isn't a bad bike shop - they're pretty great mechanics there, and very honest, so I don't think they're making stuff up. ' But the evidence here suggests the contrary. I have no doubt you'll keep going back to this place and will repeatedly have problems with your bike because these guys are incompetent. You think they really called someone at Campagnolo? Who? Campagnolo USA is a marketing firm. A rear derailer is a rear derailer This is a bicycle, not an automobile. If you like that shop so much, there's nothing wrong with buying stuff from it and taking your bike elsewhere for service. I occasionally buy stuff at Performance, but I'd never let the kids working there touch my bike.
    Well, the bike shop that's closest to me (not the one I've been referring to) used to be the one I went to the most. The owner, who sometimes does mechanical work there, is probably the most knowledgeable about Campy gear in the whole city. The reason I don't have them do as much work as the new place is that the new place is bigger and faster, and the people there friendlier, and over the years I've slowly had more business with them.

    I might go check with the old guy about this after I get my bike back; I'm sure he'll have something to say about it.

    - Tim

  3. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by tbessie View Post
    Well, the bike shop that's closest to me (not the one I've been referring to) used to be the one I went to the most. The owner, who sometimes does mechanical work there, is probably the most knowledgeable about Campy gear in the whole city. The reason I don't have them do as much work as the new place is that the new place is bigger and faster, and the people there friendlier, and over the years I've slowly had more business with them.

    I might go check with the old guy about this after I get my bike back; I'm sure he'll have something to say about it.

    - Tim
    Old guys rock.

    I'd try the other shop out. These days, Campy components aren't very common (but really, bike components are very similar). There's a few select mechanics I try to go to when I take my bike in for something I can't fix myself. They're older. They like steel bikes and Campy components. Not that the shop sells any of that stuff. I've never bought a bike there, except for my kids.

  4. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by cxwrench View Post
    It's now time to find a new shop. Or that shop needs to find some new mechanics. That's pretty much inexcusable.
    Yeah, low limit not set? I've seen derailleurs in spokes destroy frames. This is not a minor mistake and should not be forgiven. I imagine if that had killed your frame, they would have told you the hanger was bent and it wasn't their fault. Also, if the frame were not built correctly, they would have know during assembly, and never let you leave the store without telling you.

  5. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by cxwrench View Post
    It's now time to find a new shop. Or that shop needs to find some new mechanics. That's pretty much inexcusable.
    That was my take away from the OP.

  6. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by tbessie View Post
    I can't say I understand it. Not sure about your terminology (that is, how they number the cogs - there's only 11 cogs on the cassette, so what do you mean by 12, 13, 14?).
    CX is referring to the number of teeth in the cogs. 11, 12, 13, 14 are the 4 smallest cogs.

    Quote Originally Posted by tbessie View Post
    Well, the bike shop that's closest to me (not the one I've been referring to) used to be the one I went to the most. The owner, who sometimes does mechanical work there, is probably the most knowledgeable about Campy gear in the whole city. The reason I don't have them do as much work as the new place is that the new place is bigger and faster........
    1) Good
    2) Fast
    3) Inexpensive

    Pick two.

    Let me go on a rant here about everybody needing their stuff yesterday. There is a very good reason good shops have a backlog. It's because they have boatloads of customers because....they're good! If you go into a shop on a warm sunny Saturday afternoon and there is nobody in the shop, you should probably run the other way.

    Rant over. I will agree with the other posters. Any mechanic who can't figure out a limit screw is telling you to find another mechanic. Go back to your old shop.
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



  7. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    ... Any mechanic who can't figure out a limit screw is telling you to find another mechanic. Go back to your old shop.
    Exactly.

    A quick way to check is look at the derailleur hanger and cages. They should be precisely parallel with the cogs. If not parallel, it would only not shift into the last outer cog, or possibly the last inner cog, as already said.

    Detach the cable and pull it with your hand while working the shifter. You should be able to pull the cable out while clicking 8 times if 9 speed, 7 x if 8 speed. Could be dirt built up by crud kicked up by wet roads, at either end of the little piece of housing looped over top of the derailleur. You'd feel it pulling the unattached cable by hand. Could also be old dried up grease or dirt in the shifter mechanism. Its a long shot, but if you never shift into those outer cogs, dirt could build up in the click detentes you never use. You'd also feel a crimped cable pulling it by hand.

    With the derailleur detached from the cable, push it all the way in with the left hand when working the crank with the right hand, to see if the chain shifts crisply onto the most inner cog without over-shifting, adjust if necessary. Then see if it drops crisply to the last outer cog without over-shifting, when you take your hand off it and turn the crank the requisite revolutions; adjust if necessary.

    If it still sticks on the 3rd or 4th cog in with the cable detached, then its got a "crimp" somewhere in the bushings, maybe from falling over, as you suspected. You'd see scuff marks and the derailleur would be slightly out of alignment, though, if it fell over and hit the ground.

    If all the shifter clicks are working the cable freely, the derailleur cage pulleys are precisely parallel to the dropouts, the limit screws stop the derailleur parallel to the last cogs on either end, it will work across all the cogs. Then all you have to do is tweak cable tension to get the chain to fall into the gears crisply without hesitation or slightly over-shifting. Check it out.

    The shop dropped the ball on that one. You could probably fix it yourself.

  8. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by pmf View Post
    I know you're 'close to the owner' and 'This isn't a bad bike shop - they're pretty great mechanics there, and very honest, so I don't think they're making stuff up. ' But the evidence here suggests the contrary. I have no doubt you'll keep going back to this place and will repeatedly have problems with your bike because these guys are incompetent. You think they really called someone at Campagnolo? Who? Campagnolo USA is a marketing firm. A rear derailer is a rear derailer This is a bicycle, not an automobile. If you like that shop so much, there's nothing wrong with buying stuff from it and taking your bike elsewhere for service. I occasionally buy stuff at Performance, but I'd never let the kids working there touch my bike.
    I don't know if the guys in store called Campagnolo NA or not - but Dan Large and Buddy Spafford at Campagnolo NA are both gentlemen of my acquaintance and both are very competent mechanics.

    I suspect that there's a bit of "lost in translation" going on here.

    Neither Dan nor Buddy would give a diagnosis like this without quite a lot of supporting info.

    Hanger out-of-spec would not account for this problem, nor would lack of lubrication on the pivots as many others have commented. In any case, most bike frame makers are very well aware of hanger specs, which don't vary at all significantly between Campagnolo, SRAM and Shimano ...

    I'd take the RD off and send it to your local Campagnolo Service Centre and get them to look at the RD first and foremost, assuming that all the basic set-up and assembly criteria are properly taken care of ...
    HTH
    Graeme
    Velotech Cycling Ltd
    Nationally recognised & accredited training for cycle mechanics
    Main Campagnolo SC UK
    NB - Please don't PM me here, please email to velotechcycling"at" aim"dot"com

  9. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by Peter P. View Post
    What part of the hanger is out of spec?

    Usually, the only specs of interest are the distance from the derailleur mounting bolt to the center of the axle, and the horizontal relationship between the mounting bolt and the axle.

    Not completely true -
    Name:  rear_gear_hanger.jpg
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    If you are looking at a RD working towards the extremes of it's range, all of the above specs become important.

    12-23 & 53-39 you can get away with all sorts of liberties, 11-29 & 50-34. not so much ...
    HTH
    Graeme
    Velotech Cycling Ltd
    Nationally recognised & accredited training for cycle mechanics
    Main Campagnolo SC UK
    NB - Please don't PM me here, please email to velotechcycling"at" aim"dot"com

  10. #35
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    UPDATE:

    I can't comment on the "this shop is incompetent, find another shop" stuff, though I can say that they are almost always the top rated shop in the city, by both average bike buyers and high-spec'd bike owners (Yelp and Google reviews, so take that as you like). Also, the mechanic who built up the bike rides almost exclusively Campy gear, so I'm surprised he'd make these mistakes. But I understand your comments and concerns - no need to keep hammering it home. :-)

    Meanwhile - I put the shop service manager in touch with the frame-maker (he called them up while I was in the shop), and they are going to exchange information to nail down what the problem is. I spoke with the shop owner today, and he said that the comments from Campagnolo was that they've seen this specific problem on dropouts/hangers made by custom titanium frame-makers before, and it had to do with the "X" value on the above diagram being wrong. Looking at the hanger myself when I was in the shop, it *looks* like the hanger is angled way left of the near-vertical setup we see in the Campagnolo diagram above. But that's only from my non-expert eye. The shop owner said it *appeared* that the dropout had been welded on at a more extreme angle than it should have (rotated clockwise, in other words).

    Given that the frame-maker had told me that out of about 100-200 frames they make per year (I might be off on the exact number), only about 5 are spec'ed for Campagnolo gruppos, the above spec issues MIGHT be correct. I would think that it would be highly unlikely, but it's possible.

    I'll update this thread once things are resolved, one way or another.

    - Tim

  11. #36
    'brifter' is a lame word.
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    Quote Originally Posted by tbessie View Post
    UPDATE:

    I can't comment on the "this shop is incompetent, find another shop" stuff, though I can say that they are almost always the top rated shop in the city, by both average bike buyers and high-spec'd bike owners (Yelp and Google reviews, so take that as you like). Also, the mechanic who built up the bike rides almost exclusively Campy gear, so I'm surprised he'd make these mistakes. But I understand your comments and concerns - no need to keep hammering it home. :-)

    Meanwhile - I put the shop service manager in touch with the frame-maker (he called them up while I was in the shop), and they are going to exchange information to nail down what the problem is. I spoke with the shop owner today, and he said that the comments from Campagnolo was that they've seen this specific problem on dropouts/hangers made by custom titanium frame-makers before, and it had to do with the "X" value on the above diagram being wrong. Looking at the hanger myself when I was in the shop, it *looks* like the hanger is angled way left of the near-vertical setup we see in the Campagnolo diagram above. But that's only from my non-expert eye. The shop owner said it *appeared* that the dropout had been welded on at a more extreme angle than it should have (rotated clockwise, in other words).

    Given that the frame-maker had told me that out of about 100-200 frames they make per year (I might be off on the exact number), only about 5 are spec'ed for Campagnolo gruppos, the above spec issues MIGHT be correct. I would think that it would be highly unlikely, but it's possible.

    I'll update this thread once things are resolved, one way or another.

    - Tim
    I'd love to look at your bike in person...I just can't understand how it can go 5-6 rides and then stop working properly. I know you don't want to hear it anymore but you know what I'm thinking.
    Where are you located? Maybe I know of someone in your area that is for sure competent.
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  12. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by cxwrench View Post
    I'd love to look at your bike in person...I just can't understand how it can go 5-6 rides and then stop working properly. I know you don't want to hear it anymore but you know what I'm thinking.
    Where are you located? Maybe I know of someone in your area that is for sure competent.
    Yeah, it's very strange indeed. As mentioned above, it COULD be that it was one of the bikes that was knocked over at the last rest stop, since it stopped shifting properly right after that rest stop. That's the most obvious explanation, given the proximity - though I would think that the shop would be able to notice something off with the derailleur itself, and they said they found nothing.

    If the shop and frame-maker find that there's nothing wrong with the frame, I might ask for a new derailleur to be used, to see what happens after that.

    I live in San Francisco; the bike shop I used to go to most (and is in my neighborhood) is American Cyclery; the owner there is the guy I mentioned who's probably the most knowledgeable about Campy parts in the city; it's also the oldest bike shop in the city.

    The place that built up this bike has been around quite a long time and I have a long relationship with them, and this is the first problem like this I've had (and it's also the first custom frame I ever got). Since they built it up and sourced all the parts, their policy is to stand 100% behind the build, so they'll do whatever it takes to make it right. If it turns out to actually be the hanger, as the Campy rep claims, I'm not sure what I'd do. The frame-maker would no doubt offer to put on a new dropout, though that wouldn't satisfy me, given the very high cost of the frame. I'd let them know I wouldn't be satisfied unless they made me a new frame from scratch, on principle. Given prior experience in this forum, some here might call that "whiny", but hey, if I'm paying $6000 for a frame, and am working closely with the builder, and have specified that this would be a Campy bike from the start, and they got it wrong, well... that's not acceptable.

    - Tim

  13. #38
    'brifter' is a lame word.
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    Quote Originally Posted by tbessie View Post
    Yeah, it's very strange indeed. As mentioned above, it COULD be that it was one of the bikes that was knocked over at the last rest stop, since it stopped shifting properly right after that rest stop. That's the most obvious explanation, given the proximity - though I would think that the shop would be able to notice something off with the derailleur itself, and they said they found nothing.

    If the shop and frame-maker find that there's nothing wrong with the frame, I might ask for a new derailleur to be used, to see what happens after that.

    I live in San Francisco; the bike shop I used to go to most (and is in my neighborhood) is American Cyclery; the owner there is the guy I mentioned who's probably the most knowledgeable about Campy parts in the city; it's also the oldest bike shop in the city.

    The place that built up this bike has been around quite a long time and I have a long relationship with them, and this is the first problem like this I've had (and it's also the first custom frame I ever got). Since they built it up and sourced all the parts, their policy is to stand 100% behind the build, so they'll do whatever it takes to make it right. If it turns out to actually be the hanger, as the Campy rep claims, I'm not sure what I'd do. The frame-maker would no doubt offer to put on a new dropout, though that wouldn't satisfy me, given the very high cost of the frame. I'd let them know I wouldn't be satisfied unless they made me a new frame from scratch, on principle. Given prior experience in this forum, some here might call that "whiny", but hey, if I'm paying $6000 for a frame, and am working closely with the builder, and have specified that this would be a Campy bike from the start, and they got it wrong, well... that's not acceptable.

    - Tim
    I'm in Marin, pm me if you'd like me to check it out. Seven has had 'thin' dropouts forever, they provide a 2mm (I think) washer w/ all their frames because they have had issues like you, but only on the last cog. I find it hard to believe that it would work for a time, then not work if it's the hanger. I have known about American for years and have a feeling I might know the shop you bought the bike from. Both are good, for sure. If you want to bring it by and let me have a look lemme know.
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  14. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by cxwrench View Post
    I'm in Marin, pm me if you'd like me to check it out. Seven has had 'thin' dropouts forever, they provide a 2mm (I think) washer w/ all their frames because they have had issues like you, but only on the last cog. I find it hard to believe that it would work for a time, then not work if it's the hanger. I have known about American for years and have a feeling I might know the shop you bought the bike from. Both are good, for sure. If you want to bring it by and let me have a look lemme know.
    PM'd you. :-)

    - Tim

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    You know what's really really helpful in threads like this? Photos. Even better? Video of the problem.

    Has the shop ruled out the shifter?

  16. #41
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    @tbessie & @cxwrench: I hope you guys get together and sort this issue. I also hope both of you guys would post your relative experiences about your interactions.
    Trying to cram the rest of my life into the rest of my life!

  17. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by tbessie View Post
    UPDATE:

    Given that the frame-maker had told me that out of about 100-200 frames they make per year (I might be off on the exact number), only about 5 are spec'ed for Campagnolo gruppos, the above spec issues MIGHT be correct. I would think that it would be highly unlikely, but it's possible.
    - Tim
    So now the frame maker is spewing BS as well? A bike frame is a bike frame. They're not 'spec'ed' for a particular component group. Did the guy who made the frame really tell you that?

    It's pretty odd for a bike to be working fine for 80 miles and then suddenly stop shifting correctly. You sure someone didn't trip over it at the last rest stop while you were waiting in line for the bathroom?

  18. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by pmf View Post
    So now the frame maker is spewing BS as well? A bike frame is a bike frame. They're not 'spec'ed' for a particular component group. Did the guy who made the frame really tell you that?

    It's pretty odd for a bike to be working fine for 80 miles and then suddenly stop shifting correctly. You sure someone didn't trip over it at the last rest stop while you were waiting in line for the bathroom?
    I mentioned above about someone having said that at that last rest stop, there was a rumor that someone had knocked some bikes off the rack accidentally. Did you not read the whole thread?

    I told the shop this, but they said the derailleur didn't appear to be damaged or misbehaving when they examined it.

    As I said, I'll report back on results of the shop and frame maker's discussion, etc.

    - Tim

  19. #44
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    Hi, I’ve read through the whole thread and was wondering who built your frame. Would you consider privet messaging me the name of the person who built your frame? I’m in Sacramento ca area. I was born and raised in San Francisco and lived there for 50 years. I very familiar with American Cycles as I lived in inner Sunset for over 15 years.

    My best wishes with getting your issues corrected to your full satisfaction. I know how it feels to have spent the type of moneys for a custom frame built to your specifications and feel let down in the end.
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  20. #45
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    If you detach the cable from the rear deraileur (detach cable, housing and all) will the deraileur shift it to the small cog? If it doesn't then you have one of three things: a broken spring in the deraileur (unlikely), a bent hanger (pretty likely as you stated that bikes fell over) or an adjustment issue with the limit screw (most common issue but you say it was working prior). You stated that the cable is already slack when the shifter is supposedly in the highest (smallest cog) position. You could possibly have a kink in the rear housing or a frayed strand of the cable hanging up somewhere (rear barrel adjuster comes to mind), detaching the cable removes these possible issues from the equation. Possible you could also have significant bur on the cassette that is preventing the chain from releasing to the next smallest cog but that is pretty unlikely as the bike is so new.

    Good luck, my guess is it is a mechanic issue and not a framebuilder, campy issue.

  21. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by akamp View Post
    If you detach the cable from the rear deraileur (detach cable, housing and all) will the deraileur shift it to the small cog? If it doesn't then you have one of three things: a broken spring in the deraileur (unlikely), a bent hanger (pretty likely as you stated that bikes fell over) or an adjustment issue with the limit screw (most common issue but you say it was working prior). You stated that the cable is already slack when the shifter is supposedly in the highest (smallest cog) position. You could possibly have a kink in the rear housing or a frayed strand of the cable hanging up somewhere (rear barrel adjuster comes to mind), detaching the cable removes these possible issues from the equation. Possible you could also have significant bur on the cassette that is preventing the chain from releasing to the next smallest cog but that is pretty unlikely as the bike is so new.


    Good luck, my guess is it is a mechanic issue and not a framebuilder, campy issue.

    I got an email back from the framebuilder. They spoke with the Campy rep, and they worked out why Campy thought their hangers were not in spec. Here's what they said:


    After a few emails with (Campy Rep) at Campagnolo, I have some answers to the confusion we were having. I apologize for taking a few days to get back to you all, I just wanted to be sure I had all of the information.


    The main dimension in question is the derailleur hanger X. It is not clear from Campagnolo's drawings, but that measurement is taken in line with the axis from the center of the hub to the center of the bottom bracket. I attached an image of the Shimano specs here because there specs show how the measurement is taken more clearly.


    Measuring the derailleur hanger X with the bike flat on the ground and using a plumb bob dropped from the hanger and hub, as you have done, only works if the dropout is horizontal. Because frames have some bottom bracket drop, the line between the hub and bottom bracket and therefore the angle of the dropout ends up being negative, not horizontal, on an assembled bike. Therefore your measurement was overestimating the hanger X of our dropouts.


    With that in mind, I also have to admit to my own mistake. I did not look closely enough at all of our dropout specs before my earlier replies because we have never had issues with Campagnolo shifting before and I made some assumptions with that knowledge. I apologize for jumping the gun there. Our derailleur hanger X is 9mm, 1mm longer than the 4-8mm range Campagnolo recommends, but within the 7-10mm range that Shimano and SRAM recommend. We chose that dimension intentionally when working with our dropout designer several years ago, and importantly we can say from experience that it does not negatively impact the shifting. We decided on a 9mm X because moving the hanger back slightly makes it easier to insert or remove a wheel. Our previous dropout design had an 8mm X and we found that installing wheels with modern derailleurs was not ideal.


    The other main measurement of derailleur hanger placement is the hanger Y. All three component companies recommend a 24-28mm Y. Ours is 28mm both to allow for more space for large range cassettes and to provide more leeway for Campagnolo derailleurs given the 9mm X.


    After speaking with (Campy Rep) and, for good measure, with our Shimano technical rep, we do not see anything about our dropout dimensions that should cause the shifting issues that have popped up on Tim's bike, particularly the issues in the smallest cog. (Campy Rep) did offer to trouble shoot the remaining issues with you all. Would you like me to have him reach out?

    So that sounds like the hanger is ok. The bike shop made sure it wasn't bent.


    With the cable removed, the derailleur still wouldn't move below the 3rd smallest cog; it could be PUSHED there, but wouldn't move there of its own accord. The limit screw wasn't stopping it, either.


    All in all, it looks like it might be a bent spring or something internal to the derailleur. Tomorrow the shop gets a new derailleur of the same model (Chorus 11, mechanical of course) and will see if that fixes the issue. If it does, I'm hoping the Campy rep can take a look at the malfunctioning one and let us know if they see anything obvious.


    - Tim
    Last edited by tbessie; 05-02-2018 at 09:23 PM.

  22. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by tbessie View Post
    I got an email back from the framebuilder. They spoke with the Campy rep, and they worked out why Campy thought their hangers were not in spec. Here's what they said:





    So that sounds like the hanger is ok. The bike shop made sure it wasn't bent.


    With the cable removed, the derailleur still wouldn't move below the 3rd smallest cog; it could be PUSHED there, but wouldn't move there of its own accord. The limit screw wasn't stopping it, either.


    All in all, it looks like it might be a bent spring or something internal to the derailleur. Tomorrow the shop gets a new derailleur of the same model (Chorus 11, mechanical of course) and will see if that fixes the issue. If it does, I'm hoping the Campy rep can take a look at the malfunctioning one and let us know if they see anything obvious.


    - Tim
    So you got it narrowed down. A serious burr taken if the bike fell over on the derailleur side could prevent the derailleur spring from releasing the derailleur to the last inside cogs. You could feel it in your hand with the cable detached.

  23. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fredrico View Post
    So you got it narrowed down. A serious burr taken if the bike fell over on the derailleur side could prevent the derailleur spring from releasing the derailleur to the last inside cogs. You could feel it in your hand with the cable detached.
    Well I just spoke with the bike shop owner. He said they got the new derailleur in and installed it, everything works fine again.

    He also said that it's hanging at a noticeably different angle than the original.

    So it looks like the bike probably was part of that accident at the rest stop, and it somehow bent part of the derailleur itself. I *am* surprised the bike shop didn't notice the damage to the derailleur. When I pick up the bike, I'll compare the two so I can see it myself.

    I wish I could get ahold of the guy who knocked my bike over - I'd ask how he'd like to compensate me for the damage... :-/

    I also wonder - if the bike fell with enough force to bend the derailleur, what other damage could have happened to my nice new bike? Hmm...

    - Tim

  24. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by tbessie View Post
    Well I just spoke with the bike shop owner. He said they got the new derailleur in and installed it, everything works fine again.

    He also said that it's hanging at a noticeably different angle than the original.

    So it looks like the bike probably was part of that accident at the rest stop, and it somehow bent part of the derailleur itself. I *am* surprised the bike shop didn't notice the damage to the derailleur. When I pick up the bike, I'll compare the two so I can see it myself.

    I wish I could get ahold of the guy who knocked my bike over - I'd ask how he'd like to compensate me for the damage... :-/

    I also wonder - if the bike fell with enough force to bend the derailleur, what other damage could have happened to my nice new bike? Hmm...

    - Tim
    Hmmmm the plot thickens. Chorus 11s RDs don't have much of anything bendable on them. Most everything except the cage is reinforced resin (AKA plastic), aside from the fasteners and pivots. But a bent cage is one of the first things you check for, and a Chorus cage is easy to spot if it isn't hanging correctly.
    "Refreshingly Unconcerned With The Vulgar Exigencies Of Veracity "

  25. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marc View Post
    Hmmmm the plot thickens. Chorus 11s RDs don't have much of anything bendable on them. Most everything except the cage is reinforced resin (AKA plastic), aside from the fasteners and pivots. But a bent cage is one of the first things you check for, and a Chorus cage is easy to spot if it isn't hanging correctly.
    I've asked for them to save the old derailleur for me so I can examine it; perhaps I'll even send it to Campagnolo to see if they can find anything.

    - Tim

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