Endurance road bike or cross bike for winter bike
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 27
  1. #1
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    17

    Endurance road bike or cross bike for winter bike

    I need a winter bike for commuting (approximately 250 km per week) and training during the weekends.

    The commuting part mostly includes paved roads.

    I live in Scandinavia meaning that the roads will be pretty rough to the bike during the winter months (rain, dirt and generally poor conditions).

    I have received an attractive offer for a BMC Granfondo (my preferred solution) but are in doubt as to whether I would be better off with a cross bike that can that can take +28 mm tyres.

    I would use some of my old (non-disc) wheels for the bike and therefore go for rim/cantilever brakes.

    Any relevant experiences?
    ------------------------------------------------------------------
    Cervelo RCA
    Trek Koppenberg

  2. #2
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Posts
    2,359
    Go for an aluminum cross bike and make sure it has mounts for mud-guards. The extra tire clearance will give you the most tire choices and the mud guards will preserve the whole bike, not to mention your clothes. Use fill coverage mud-guards. They will quickly become your favorite things.

  3. #3
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Posts
    456
    Go for a frame that will clear a 32mm tire with some crud on it.

  4. #4
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    8,929
    "relaxed road bikes" could mean anything from a frame that's been used in grand tours to something I'd recommend to my grandmother. I don't know much about cross bikes but I suspect the term encompasses a lot of handling and fit variations for them as well.

    Forget what a bike is called and get the features you need regardless of what it's called. I think fenders are a definite. Rack? probably. So consider something with mounts. You'll want lights for those very short days up North there too but you can get lights on pretty much any frame.

    Handling and fit? Some people don't want to think about that just getting to work while others like to spice up the commute a little and ride aggressively. that's up to you but judge bike handling and fit on a bike by bike basis not a marketing label by marketing label basis.

  5. #5
    CX'er
    Reputation: bikerector's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    863
    I would also opt for a bike that takes wider tires and fenders for winter riding. Looks like the BMC gran fondo only allows up to a 28mm tire. This is assuming you see snow/ice where studded tires are very nice to have. If it's just rainy, 28mm should be acceptable.

  6. #6
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    3,614
    I say bigger tires are what matter most. After that its what you prefer, some may like disc brakes while others want cantilever style.

  7. #7
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    3,148
    I say discs, especially if your rims are $118.00 ea like mine are on my rim bikes. Unless you use some beater rims/wheels, this could get expensive. It is pretty wet here those times of year.. usually. And cleaning the gray muck is no for me personally.

    Bigger tires I agree, especially if you are my size, 100 kilos those times of year. ;)
    Quote Originally Posted by Robt57/Me!
    Everything you read that I post is just '1' guy's opinion, try to sort it all out best you can. ;) I will try to add value in my posts, if I miss the mark please let me know using a little decorum.

  8. #8
    Idiot at large
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    5,457
    cross bike, so you can get Nokian studded tires (which are not made by Nokian, from what I heard)
    2010 Specialized Secteur Elite with the RBR not-approved Mavic Ksyrium Elite wheelset
    2009 Specialized Rockhopper Comp 29er upgraded to SRAM X9 with 1x10 and Stan's Arch EX rims and tubeless.
    2013 Cannondale CAADX-6 Tiagra with 9-speed SLX RD to run 11-32T cassette and Stan's Alpha 400 rims and tubeless
    and
    Some Burton snowboard setups, one with stiff ol' Camber and one with Rocker-Camber-Rocker

  9. #9
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    17
    Thanks for all the good input.

    I will go for a cross bike with a fit that, to the extent possible, matches my road bikes.
    ------------------------------------------------------------------
    Cervelo RCA
    Trek Koppenberg

  10. #10
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: looigi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    7,162
    ... or gravel bike.

    https://youtu.be/HKMVsMqaErs
    ... 'cuz that's how I roll.

  11. #11
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    191
    While I do not live in the same climate as you... I was thinking the same thing of gravel bike. GT Grade or Cannondale Slate. While I think the BMC GranFondo is above my price range... the Cannondale Synapse is equivalent to the type of bike I am looking for. But, now that I have been looking at "gravel bikes" specifically... Im rethinking.

  12. #12
    apn
    apn is offline
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    214
    I used a Cannondale CAADX 105 last winter, specifically because it featured;

    - AL frame
    - Full fender mounts
    - Disc brakes
    - Clearance for 35mm+ tires
    - Rack/panier mounting points

    Cannondale's Synapse 105 offers most of the same features, except it won't take large tires (comes with 25's but should be able to fit 28's) and there are no rack/panier mounts. Note the Synapse AL frame has full fender mounts, whereas the Synapse Carbon frame does not!

  13. #13
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    3,148
    I'd add that before I had a nice steel custom made this year, disc that fits up to a 2.1 650b I had used a 2009 TCX Giant. My only complaint was the Canti brake on dryer faster group rides. I just never felt they worked well enough. [read bottom of post re: brakes]

    The I got a Disc Roubaix and traded the to the TCX to a friend who is 4" taller, it was always a bit big for me really. But I really liked the TCX, before they raised the BB way up in 2011 IIRC.

    Ultimately the Roubaix proved too focused use and expensive for a winter bike, but the disc I liked just fine. Especially fixing a flat in the rain was a major improvement not getting rim brake grey muck all over myself... MEH! ;)

    A disc CX bike that fits bigger tires makes for a Swiss army bike, which is what the steel one that I had made replacing the disc Roubaix. With a LOT of added flexibility of use due to bigger tires than can fit. And no 160mm rotor and the 28-30mm tire limitations. The steel bike with steel fork weighs just about the same as the Roubaix. Less if you count the Roubaix with the stock wheels. But I doubt other than a custom steel frameset this would be the case. I managed to sell the Roubaix breaking even, the custom frame and fork cost more than entire Roubaix ran me. So, want to be clear wither way we are talking extravagant winter bikes. Bit at least the custom does gravel/woods/singletrak and CX. Except for me it is too expensive to CX. I have a Salsa Chili Con Kermit for that.

    The Chili Con Kemit had had Cantis, OK for CX. But I recently put new STIs and short arm mini V Tektro brakes on it. I wish I had these on my TCX back when I road it a lot. They are Tektro 926al and work fantastic with road STI levers, 35mm tire drop right out clearing the pads when you open the noodle These are going on out Tandem, and very not expensive. No little pulleys needed like the XT V on the Tandem to make the cable pull work with STIs!! I am in awe of these inexpensive brakes.
    Last edited by robt57; 10-07-2015 at 09:45 AM.
    Quote Originally Posted by Robt57/Me!
    Everything you read that I post is just '1' guy's opinion, try to sort it all out best you can. ;) I will try to add value in my posts, if I miss the mark please let me know using a little decorum.

  14. #14
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    191
    Quote Originally Posted by apn View Post
    Cannondale's Synapse 105 offers most of the same features, except it won't take large tires (comes with 25's but should be able to fit 28's) and there are no rack/panier mounts. Note the Synapse AL frame has full fender mounts, whereas the Synapse Carbon frame does not!
    The current Cannondale Synapse disk comes with 28s and so far I have confirmed that it can handle 30s. Im trying to confirm the largest tire size possible...

  15. #15
    apn
    apn is offline
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    214
    Quote Originally Posted by dirtiClydesdale View Post
    The current Cannondale Synapse disk comes with 28s and so far I have confirmed that it can handle 30s. Im trying to confirm the largest tire size possible...
    There may be reqional/market differences, but in Europe the Synapse 105 is offered with 25's or 28's depending on the frame/config;

    - AL frame, disk brakes: Schwalbe Lugano 700x25
    - Carbon frame, rim brakes: Schwalbe Lugano 700x25
    - Carbon frame, disk brakes: Schwalbe Lugano 700x28

    ROAD - BIKES - 2016

    The good news is that the AL and Carbon frames share the same geometry, so if one takes 28's they all should , plus if one can squeeze a 30, it should fit them all.

    One note of caution. I installed the excellent, rattle-free Bontrager NCS Road fenders on my Synapse and the 700x18-25 size is a tight fit in the fork bridge. I squeezed the fender in without resorting to tools. However, the 700x28-35 sized fender would certainly require modification.

  16. #16
    NewRoadEnthusiast-Again
    Reputation: geekjimmy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    103
    Quote Originally Posted by looigi View Post
    ... or gravel bike.

    https://youtu.be/HKMVsMqaErs
    I didn't know the Ridley took a 40mm tire. My DB Haanjo Trail came with 40s, and I actually put smaller tires on it.

  17. #17
    CX'er
    Reputation: bikerector's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    863
    I just noticed the new norco valence disk (sponsor plug, their endurance road bike) allows 32mm tires. I would think this would make a nice winter bike as 32mm tires are pretty good with dirtier roads. I mostly mention this in that if norco is doing it with their disk equipped endurance road bike, someone else probably is too. For me, I think something like this would be a great gravel race bike since many of the gravel specific bikes I've had have HA numbers that are too far removed from my road race bike to feel familiar on pavement and I never ride just gravel. Some of the "anyroad" bikes have slacker HA's than my hardtail, but some people like that stable front end to plow through the gravel instead of riding all over the road picking lines through the chatter bumps.

  18. #18
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: ColaJacket's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Posts
    376
    Quote Originally Posted by dirtiClydesdale View Post
    While I do not live in the same climate as you... I was thinking the same thing of gravel bike. GT Grade or Cannondale Slate. While I think the BMC GranFondo is above my price range... the Cannondale Synapse is equivalent to the type of bike I am looking for. But, now that I have been looking at "gravel bikes" specifically... Im rethinking.
    That was my thought as well. Gravel Bikes.

    GH

  19. #19
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    3,614
    Not only should you be focusing on a bike with larger tires but studded tires too. Traction is what matters, more than disc brakes.

  20. #20
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    17
    I have now bought a Trek Boone frameset.

    I have decided to go for a size 54 in order to get a fit close to my other road bikes. I am normally a size 56.

    It will be built up with the drive train from one of my existing road bikes which I would replace anyway next season and 32 mm tyres.

    I am going to pick up the bike on Monday.

    Look very much forward to it.

  21. #21
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    17
    I have now picked up my new bike and done my first ride.

    I am very happy.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    ------------------------------------------------------------------
    Cervelo RCA
    Trek Koppenberg

  22. #22
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    3,148
    Enjoy.

    But I will say one thing, well two beside liking the colors a lot. ;)

    Tektro 926AL brakes. Just put them on a canti salsa and fantastic, and inexpensive.


    What was your choice of tire, I am curious?
    Last edited by robt57; 10-12-2015 at 11:24 AM.
    Quote Originally Posted by Robt57/Me!
    Everything you read that I post is just '1' guy's opinion, try to sort it all out best you can. ;) I will try to add value in my posts, if I miss the mark please let me know using a little decorum.

  23. #23
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    17
    My LBS offered me a pair of Durano Plus 28 mm tires that I can use until they got something wider. Have not finally decided what to go for (would like the perfect compromise between fast rolling, road grip and puncture resistance).

  24. #24
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    3,148
    Quote Originally Posted by Sbccbs View Post
    (would like the perfect compromise between fast rolling, road grip and puncture resistance).
    Aahh... we all would. ;)
    Quote Originally Posted by Robt57/Me!
    Everything you read that I post is just '1' guy's opinion, try to sort it all out best you can. ;) I will try to add value in my posts, if I miss the mark please let me know using a little decorum.

  25. #25
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: BCSaltchucker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    2,053
    On the tire issue: Not all gravel or dirty roads are created equal. I thought I would be making use of some heavy duty 32mm tires for my winter riding on my winter bike (a Lynksey Copper CX w cable disks). The bike came with some TOmac Cyclocross knobbies, which I quickly discarded - too noisy and slow and the pavemen would remove the knobbies quick (save them for cross race some day).

    I put on Conti Touring Plus 32mm wire bead. They are bombproof, but very heavy and slow feeling. So this spring I put on some Conti Gator Hardshell folding 28mm tires. Also bombproof, but take high pressure and feel much more sprightly. The gravel I ride on is mostly fine roadbase type, and can be ridden with regular road bike tires even (with some trepidation). SO no need for hard core gravel tires or cross tires. Oh and never got a flat on any of my road bikes in more than 2 years now. Though I have yet to ride the Hardshell in mucky steep gravel yet (might be a little slippy?) I did encounter tons of greasy wet leaves all over the rails-to-trail gravel route I rode this past week a few times (and a little bit of singletrack dirt), and no issues.


    ultimately, you have to evaluate your conditions, and the advice you get online might be way out of whack for your purposes.

    And great looking Trek you bought! envious of the Duraace
    Last edited by BCSaltchucker; 10-12-2015 at 02:34 PM.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. First endurance road bike question
    By jp4270 in forum Bikes, Frames and Forks
    Replies: 23
    Last Post: 06-18-2015, 12:10 PM
  2. Replies: 7
    Last Post: 09-03-2014, 12:49 PM
  3. Why not just use an Endurance Road Bike
    By ejprez in forum Bikes, Frames and Forks
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: 10-03-2012, 03:49 PM
  4. Replies: 15
    Last Post: 01-12-2011, 08:21 AM
  5. Replies: 2
    Last Post: 08-22-2007, 11:36 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT ROADBIKEREVIEW

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2019 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.