Frame Materials - Page 3
Page 3 of 10 FirstFirst 12345 ... LastLast
Results 51 to 75 of 236

Thread: Frame Materials

  1. #51
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    479
    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Kunich View Post
    I rode sew-ups for maybe 4 years. Pre-glued sew-ups simply pull over the old pre-glued rim that just had a flat. They even work better since they don't have to dry. If you are unaware of that you sure must have raced as a real expert and paid a mechanic to work on your bike. Maybe that is why there are so many second hand tubular carbon wheelsets on eBay for so little.
    With all due respect (which you deserve very little of at this point), you don't have a clue.

  2. #52
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Posts
    218
    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    Your credibility in this thread just dropped a few more notches. Nuff said!
    So you have a problem with Chinese carbon wheels do you? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=87MsGZ8fP9k

  3. #53
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Posts
    218
    I was mistaken about the cost of the new custom built from the rider's measurements Tomassini. They were $5,000 each for him and his wife.

  4. #54
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Posts
    218
    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    WTF are you talking about? Shimano mechanical shifting became much better with the advent of 5800/6800 and then 7000/8000 groupos which happen to be 11 speed. Of course you wouldn't know that since you have no experience with 11 speed groupos.

    Perhaps you need a hug?
    I still haven't seen you post what you're riding. I suggest that if you're going to tell me about the 11 speed shifting that you actually be riding it.

  5. #55
    tlg
    tlg is online now
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: tlg's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    15,172
    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Kunich View Post
    I still haven't seen you post what you're riding. I suggest that if you're going to tell me about the 11 speed shifting that you actually be riding it.
    Lots of us are riding 11sp. YOU are not. YOU do not know what you're talking about. (when you're in a hole... stop digging)

    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Kunich View Post
    Though they are all getting less reliable shifting with compact gearing and a hill climbing 11-32. Of course I don't have any experience with the 11's and 12's since with a 10 speed I'm shifting two and three gears at a time in changing terrain.
    Custom Di2 & Garmin/GoPro mounts 2013 SuperSix EVO Hi-MOD Team * 2004 Klein Aura V

  6. #56
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Posts
    218
    Quote Originally Posted by cxwrench View Post
    This doesn't have anything to do w/ any discussion in this thread but I said I'd answer anything. Generally 6 riders at any given race( AToC), sometimes 8. Mostly 6 for UCI races. I'd usually take 4 rears and 2-3 fronts. All tubulars. I've probably glued well over 1500 tubulars in the last 20-some years and I can say for sure you don't know the first thing about them. Nor do you have any meaningful knowledge of Di2.

    Troll.
    So you have 6 to 8 riders and 4 rear wheels and 2-3 front. There are areas in European races in which the entire Peloton will get flats all at once. We watched coverage of one of the lead riders get a flat three times over the length of a stage. In spring classis getting several flats is all part of the race.

    So what you're saying is that you simply kiss off part of your team because you believe that you have to put fresh wet glue on ever wheel and let them dry overnight.

    I haven't the slightest idea where you're coming from. On training rides we always had two sewups tied under the back of the saddle with toe clip straps. If we got a flat we just pulled the flat off of the rim and pulled the replacement on. You'd ride carefully for the first 10 minutes and then ride normally after that.

    It is not as if this was any sort of magic so I cannot understand why you seem to think that you can throw away perhaps half of your team because you don't know how to change a sewup.

  7. #57
    tlg
    tlg is online now
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: tlg's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    15,172
    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Kunich View Post
    There are areas in European races in which the entire Peloton will get flats all at once.
    Bull$#it. Never happened. Ever.


    It is not as if this was any sort of magic so I cannot understand why you seem to think that you can throw away perhaps half of your team because you don't know how to change a sewup.
    No pro changes a sewup in a race. Ever.


    Of course it should be easy for you to show some YouTube videos of these occurrences. An entire peloton getting flats all at once would be the biggest news in the history of bike racing. As well as a team mechanic fixing a sewup roadside.
    Custom Di2 & Garmin/GoPro mounts 2013 SuperSix EVO Hi-MOD Team * 2004 Klein Aura V

  8. #58
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    479
    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Kunich View Post
    So you have 6 to 8 riders and 4 rear wheels and 2-3 front. There are areas in European races in which the entire Peloton will get flats all at once. We watched coverage of one of the lead riders get a flat three times over the length of a stage. In spring classis getting several flats is all part of the race.

    So what you're saying is that you simply kiss off part of your team because you believe that you have to put fresh wet glue on ever wheel and let them dry overnight.

    I haven't the slightest idea where you're coming from. On training rides we always had two sewups tied under the back of the saddle with toe clip straps. If we got a flat we just pulled the flat off of the rim and pulled the replacement on. You'd ride carefully for the first 10 minutes and then ride normally after that.

    It is not as if this was any sort of magic so I cannot understand why you seem to think that you can throw away perhaps half of your team because you don't know how to change a sewup.
    Stop it. Stop it. Stop it! This argument of yours is just plain wrong. For anyone out there riding tubulars, please do not follow this guys advice. CX and I along with i assume many others in this thread know how to mount a F(&^ing tubular. No mechanic on this planet would let someone ride a tire in the condition you described above EVER.go back to your other silly ideas about disc brakes and 11 speed drivetrains. At least those opinions won't kill someone.

  9. #59
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Posts
    218
    Quote Originally Posted by tlg View Post
    lol

    You should stop trying to show off how little you know.
    How little I know about what? I'm an electronics engineer specializing in embedded systems which electronic shifting is. I have communications boards I designed and programmed on the International Space Station. I designed the micro-titration device used to discover HIV and clear it out of the world wide blood banking system so that people like Greg Lemond could be treated in a fraction of the time. So I suppose I should wonder what you know about it?

  10. #60
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Posts
    218
    Quote Originally Posted by tlg View Post
    I'm not the one lecturing people on what they don't need.
    As I said, ride what makes you happy. But you don't need all those gears. So don't be a hypocrite and tell others what they need
    Then perhaps you can explain your comments about Ti not being Aero? Or your belief that Chinese carbon wheels are inferior? Or how 11 and 12 speeds shift better than 10 speeds even though they have extremely wide gear ratios? Oh yeah, and how you know all about Di2?

  11. #61
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Posts
    218
    Quote Originally Posted by No Time Toulouse View Post
    Not according to my Materials professor at the engineering school where I received my engineering degree. Aluminum, by definition, ALWAYS has a finite life. You seem to know ugatz about everything you talk about in your screed. I am now that much dumber for wasting my time reading your drivel. Don't you have better things to do than post long-winded tomes on stuff which you are profoundly ignorant about?
    Indeed your professor is correct. BUT if that finite life is longer than your own lifespan what difference does it make? Alan and Vitus aluminum bikes are all over the place and not failing. You can go to Trek and buy lower end aluminum framed road bikes with a lifetime warranty on them.

    Aluminum is a material that always has a stress to failure point. But it is entirely dependent upon the percentage of stress to material strength. Heavier tubes (relatively) last longer. Some aluminum alloys have such a high strength that the stress of a rider on a frame is so small that you can effectively say that they are not being stressed.

    What do you suppose the lifespan of a B52 is? They are made entirely of aluminum alloy and were initially brought into service in 1954. Although most of the fleet is moth-balled virtually every one of them is flyable.

  12. #62
    'brifter' is a lame word.
    Reputation: cxwrench's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    14,588
    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Kunich View Post
    So you have 6 to 8 riders and 4 rear wheels and 2-3 front. There are areas in European races in which the entire Peloton will get flats all at once. We watched coverage of one of the lead riders get a flat three times over the length of a stage. In spring classis getting several flats is all part of the race.

    So what you're saying is that you simply kiss off part of your team because you believe that you have to put fresh wet glue on ever wheel and let them dry overnight.

    I haven't the slightest idea where you're coming from. On training rides we always had two sewups tied under the back of the saddle with toe clip straps. If we got a flat we just pulled the flat off of the rim and pulled the replacement on. You'd ride carefully for the first 10 minutes and then ride normally after that.

    It is not as if this was any sort of magic so I cannot understand why you seem to think that you can throw away perhaps half of your team because you don't know how to change a sewup.
    You are lying. Outright lying. You have absolutely ZERO idea what you're talking about. None whatsoever. People like you spouting bullshit like this are what causes members to get angry and turn threads into shouting matches...which in turn keeps new members from wanting to ever post anything. I've seen your crap on other forums and what people say about you there as well. You live for this ****. You know a very tiny little bit about a bunch of random topics and it's just enough to start **** everywhere you post. You'll never stop because you crave the attention. You're desperate for it.
    I work for some bike racers
    I've got some bikes, some guns,
    and a bunch of skateboards

  13. #63
    tlg
    tlg is online now
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: tlg's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    15,172
    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Kunich View Post
    Then perhaps you can explain your comments about Ti not being Aero? Or your belief that Chinese carbon wheels are inferior? Or how 11 and 12 speeds shift better than 10 speeds even though they have extremely wide gear ratios? Oh yeah, and how you know all about Di2?
    Ti is less Aero than carbon. There's nothing to explain

    I never said anything about Chinese carbon. Pay attention to what you read.

    11 shifts as good or better than 10. I've had both. It does. Period.. You don't know what you're talking about.

    I know all about di2 because as I've said I have 3 bikes, all with Di2, and I built them all. I know what I'm talking about. You don't.

  14. #64
    [REDACTED]
    Reputation: Lombard's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    10,018
    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Kunich View Post
    I still haven't seen you post what you're riding. I suggest that if you're going to tell me about the 11 speed shifting that you actually be riding it.
    Eeeeegad Beavis, pay attention! Did you not read my post #28 where I said:

    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    I have 7 bikes (including 2 carbon bikes) and have never spent more than $2,200 on a bike. The most expensive bikes I have ever bought are my 2014 full carbon Cannondale Synapse and my 2017 Reynolds 631 Jamis Renegade gravel bike - both were 105 groupos and both were $2,200.
    And both are 11 speed. Now, pay very, very close attention here. My 11 speed bikes shift smoother than my 10 speed and 9 speed bikes. But not because of 11 speeds, but because Shimano made improvements when they went to 11 speed. Got it?
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



  15. #65
    'brifter' is a lame word.
    Reputation: cxwrench's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    14,588
    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Kunich View Post
    How little I know about what? I'm an electronics engineer specializing in embedded systems which electronic shifting is. I have communications boards I designed and programmed on the International Space Station. I designed the micro-titration device used to discover HIV and clear it out of the world wide blood banking system so that people like Greg Lemond could be treated in a fraction of the time. So I suppose I should wonder what you know about it?
    We're on a bicycle forum. We're talking about bicycles. Unless you're an engineer working in the bicycle business I don't give a rat's ass what you do. You know what I do and at what level I do it. Knowing that you should just not post in this thread anymore but that won't happen.
    I work for some bike racers
    I've got some bikes, some guns,
    and a bunch of skateboards

  16. #66
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Posts
    218
    Quote Originally Posted by duriel View Post
    This is totally crazy statement... my Di2 electonic was less than $4K, it's CF too!
    NOT one advantage? How's about never having to change cables?
    To tell you the truth I had to think on this for awhile. Unless I'm changing components I've never changed shift or brake cables. I takes a ride or two on a new set of cables for them to "stretch" so that you can reset the adjustments. And that only is on the shift cables. I've never had brake cables stretch. Well, at least not since we started using stainless steel.

    The SRAM eTap levers alone with hydraulic disk capability are $2400. I suppose that you can buy a finished bike with these sorts of components on them for perhaps 30% cheaper but American deep carbon wheels are nearly $2,000. That doesn't leave a great deal of room for a disk brake capable carbon frame. Nor the rest of a build package.

    So exactly what is crazy about what I wrote?

  17. #67
    [REDACTED]
    Reputation: Lombard's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    10,018
    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Kunich View Post
    So you have a problem with Chinese carbon wheels do you? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=87MsGZ8fP9k
    Not as long as I have a good dental plan. And you yourself said you have one that delaminated. See below:

    https://forums.roadbikereview.com/wh...os-355401.html

    https://forums.roadbikereview.com/wh...es-365053.html

    Furthermore, the wheels in the video you linked are from a reputable brand, not a Chinese knock-off.
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



  18. #68
    tlg
    tlg is online now
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: tlg's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    15,172
    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Kunich View Post
    To tell you the truth I had to think on this for awhile. Unless I'm changing components I've never changed shift or brake cables.
    lmao

    The SRAM eTap levers alone with hydraulic disk capability are $2400.
    omg your cluelessness knows no limits. etap isn't di2. And di2 (or etap) come in rim brake versions.

  19. #69
    'brifter' is a lame word.
    Reputation: cxwrench's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    14,588
    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Kunich View Post
    To tell you the truth I had to think on this for awhile. Unless I'm changing components I've never changed shift or brake cables. I takes a ride or two on a new set of cables for them to "stretch" so that you can reset the adjustments. And that only is on the shift cables. I've never had brake cables stretch. Well, at least not since we started using stainless steel.

    The SRAM eTap levers alone with hydraulic disk capability are $2400. I suppose that you can buy a finished bike with these sorts of components on them for perhaps 30% cheaper but American deep carbon wheels are nearly $2,000. That doesn't leave a great deal of room for a disk brake capable carbon frame. Nor the rest of a build package.

    So exactly what is crazy about what I wrote?
    Both points you just made.

    No cable 'stretches'. Doesn't happen.

    SRAM AXS etap hydro levers (and brakes and derailleurs and rotors and charging stuff) is $2500 for Red, Force is $2000. Red AXS etap shifters/disc calipers are $1200 a set, not $2400.

    Keep going, every post you make chisels away at any last shred of credibility you might have. Wanna talk about tubulars again? Di2 security? 11 speed drivetrains that you haven't even ridden yet?
    I work for some bike racers
    I've got some bikes, some guns,
    and a bunch of skateboards

  20. #70
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Posts
    218
    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    Eeeeegad Beavis, pay attention! Did you not read my post #28 where I said:



    And both are 11 speed. Now, pay very, very close attention here. My 11 speed bikes shift smoother than my 10 speed and 9 speed bikes. But not because of 11 speeds, but because Shimano made improvements when they went to 11 speed. Got it?
    And yet you still haven't said what you're riding. The entire reason behind a 12 speed was a single chainring. To have the same gear spread as a Campy Record 10 speed on a compact crank with an 11-28 rear cogset that would be something like an 11-60. That means that the 12 speed has a reduced ratio set. But it is STILL over a much larger cogset of 11-34 or even 11-36, These do not shift better despite your claims about it. The rear derailleur has a much larger throw and in order to control the hopping they are putting hydraulic movement controllers in them.

    And you aren't a pro-racer. You don't even use half of the ratios you have with a 10 speed let alone an 11. What in the hell do you do with a cogset of 11-12-13-14-15-17-19-21-23-25-28? Oh, wait, you need a 32 don't you? So it is 11-12-13-14-16-18-20-23-25-28-32. Oh wait - you can't put linear chain pickups on a cassette like that.

    That 11 speed should work well on your Trek 2300.

  21. #71
    [REDACTED]
    Reputation: Lombard's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    10,018
    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Kunich View Post
    And yet you still haven't said what you're riding. .................
    I told you twice. Arrrrrrgggghhhh, I give up!
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



  22. #72
    tlg
    tlg is online now
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: tlg's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    15,172
    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Kunich View Post
    And you aren't a pro-racer. You don't even use half of the ratios you have with a 10 speed let alone an 11. What in the hell do you do with a cogset of 11-12-13-14-15-17-19-21-23-25-28?
    lmao you're a hoot. Pure ignorance.
    You don't need to be a pro racer to use all your gears. That's just stupid.

    11-32 shifts like butter. Big ring or little. Cross chain. Doesn't matter.

    Thanks for all the laughs!

  23. #73
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Posts
    218
    Quote Originally Posted by cxwrench View Post
    You are lying. Outright lying. You have absolutely ZERO idea what you're talking about. None whatsoever. People like you spouting bullshit like this are what causes members to get angry and turn threads into shouting matches...which in turn keeps new members from wanting to ever post anything. I've seen your crap on other forums and what people say about you there as well. You live for this ****. You know a very tiny little bit about a bunch of random topics and it's just enough to start **** everywhere you post. You'll never stop because you crave the attention. You're desperate for it.
    Look, you haven't answered the questions I posed. Is that why you're getting upset? Because you don't actually have any answers? Last year (year before?) in the early stages of the Tour when they went through the Paris-Roubaix course the first three riders were the ONLY members of all of the teams not to get a flat.

    Explain how they managed to not lose half of their 9 man teams while only carrying 4 rear wheels.

    The team mechanic I talked to was lying to me right?

    Do you suppose that the Mavic neutral support car was able to give everyone a wheel? Oh, wait, they only carry normal rim brake wheels with the small axles. There are several different axle sizes for disk brake wheels. And two different diameter disks.

    I am sorry that this is upsetting you but YOU are the one telling ME that I don't know what I'm talking about even though we normally rode sew-ups like this. As good clinchers came out we stopped using them because everyone was tired of scraping off the glue, cutting the sew-ups open and repairing the tubes and sewing them back up again and regluing them on.

    You said that you've glued on HUNDREDS of these and yet you cannot carry enough for a team. Then you start talking about CX which is an entirely different circus. You have a pit and a large stack of spare wheels.

    Do you think that I haven't raced before and know at least a little about it? I can sure tell the BS when it is flowing. I'm sure that you know what you're doing but I'm also sure that you only do a rather small part of it.

  24. #74
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Posts
    218
    Quote Originally Posted by tlg View Post
    lmao

    omg your cluelessness knows no limits. etap isn't di2. And di2 (or etap) come in rim brake versions.
    At what point are you going to learn what this string is about? It ended up being about $13,000 bikes what with your continuing to change the subject. Now you're trying to find a cheaper version to offer?

  25. #75
    'brifter' is a lame word.
    Reputation: cxwrench's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    14,588
    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Kunich View Post
    Look, you haven't answered the questions I posed. Is that why you're getting upset? Because you don't actually have any answers? Last year (year before?) in the early stages of the Tour when they went through the Paris-Roubaix course the first three riders were the ONLY members of all of the teams not to get a flat.

    Explain how they managed to not lose half of their 9 man teams while only carrying 4 rear wheels.

    The team mechanic I talked to was lying to me right?

    Do you suppose that the Mavic neutral support car was able to give everyone a wheel? Oh, wait, they only carry normal rim brake wheels with the small axles. There are several different axle sizes for disk brake wheels. And two different diameter disks.

    I am sorry that this is upsetting you but YOU are the one telling ME that I don't know what I'm talking about even though we normally rode sew-ups like this. As good clinchers came out we stopped using them because everyone was tired of scraping off the glue, cutting the sew-ups open and repairing the tubes and sewing them back up again and regluing them on.

    You said that you've glued on HUNDREDS of these and yet you cannot carry enough for a team. Then you start talking about CX which is an entirely different circus. You have a pit and a large stack of spare wheels.

    Do you think that I haven't raced before and know at least a little about it? I can sure tell the BS when it is flowing. I'm sure that you know what you're doing but I'm also sure that you only do a rather small part of it.
    It's obvious to me and everyone else that you don't know what you're talking about. I NEVER mentioned CX...that's my screen name. You asked me what I took in the car, I told you. I've NEVER run out of wheels. If that's the case I've never had a rider not finish a race because I didn't have a wheel for them. I've NEVER worked P-R so I don't worry about massive numbers of pinch flats/punctures. I can tell by how you talk about tubulars you're clueless.
    There has never been a race...any race...where over 180 riders flatted at the same time. If you think there has been the burden of proof is on you.
    I've worked for mens pro teams, womens pro teams, the US National Team, UCI ranked CX, Track, and Mtb riders. I've worked at multiple World Cups and National Championships in all disciplines. Yes, I know a little of what we're talking about.
    You? You're a guy that rides bikes and claims to have 'talked' to people.
    I work for some bike racers
    I've got some bikes, some guns,
    and a bunch of skateboards

Page 3 of 10 FirstFirst 12345 ... LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Aluminum Frame Materials?
    By DRLski in forum Bikes, Frames and Forks
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 07-19-2008, 06:06 AM
  2. frame materials assistance! please?
    By celerystalksme in forum General Cycling Discussion
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: 11-20-2007, 03:40 PM
  3. Profit margins of various frame materials
    By Friction_Shifter in forum Bikes, Frames and Forks
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 03-05-2006, 01:36 AM
  4. What are the pros and cons of different frame/fork materials?
    By BATMAN in forum Bikes, Frames and Forks
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 08-23-2005, 09:42 PM
  5. Carbon frame materials
    By power1369 in forum Bikes, Frames and Forks
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 04-13-2005, 04:19 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT ROADBIKEREVIEW

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2019 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.