Frame Materials - Page 4
Page 4 of 11 FirstFirst ... 23456 ... LastLast
Results 76 to 100 of 262

Thread: Frame Materials

  1. #76
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Posts
    279
    Quote Originally Posted by tlg View Post
    lmao you're a hoot. Pure ignorance.
    You don't need to be a pro racer to use all your gears. That's just stupid.

    11-32 shifts like butter. Big ring or little. Cross chain. Doesn't matter.

    Thanks for all the laughs!
    Oh, that's right - you have everything ever built on a bicycle you cannot tell us about. I keep forgetting these little points.

    This was about frame materials. The point was that it doesn't MATTER what materials you use. Carbon fiber is more aero? Prove that it makes any difference at all since 90% of the drag on a bike is the rider. The infinitesimal difference in drag between a CF frame and any other round tube frame is completely negated with one single gust of wind while you're sitting upright to round a corner.

    Tour de France times are coming down? Gee, maybe that has something to do with the average stage length getting shorter. That is what is known by big boys as "marketing".

    As for your idea that you don't have to be a racer yada yada - there's a large difference between putting it in a gear and it making any difference. 8 speeds were about all that was needed on a human powered bicycle. Armstrong wanted a 9th so that he could always have a climbing gear and whatever Lance did was magic. The component manufacturers were inundated with the demand for 9 speeds and they discovered that simply adding another gear would cause everyone to trash perfectly good components and buy an entirely new group.

    That doesn't mean that there haven't been perfectly good improvements. Skeleton brakes have a higher leverage and make easier application of the brakes. Compact cranks allow you to use only two speed rings without the complication and weight of a triple. Shimano pioneered the Compact front derailleur which is far less likely to drop a chain. Through shaft cranks are lighter and stiffer.

    But number of gears? What a joke.

  2. #77
    Russian Troll Farmer
    Reputation: No Time Toulouse's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Posts
    2,556
    "L'enfer, c'est les autres"

  3. #78
    'brifter' is a lame word.
    Reputation: cxwrench's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    14,804
    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Kunich View Post
    Oh, that's right - you have everything ever built on a bicycle you cannot tell us about. I keep forgetting these little points.

    This was about frame materials. The point was that it doesn't MATTER what materials you use. Carbon fiber is more aero? Prove that it makes any difference at all since 90% of the drag on a bike is the rider. The infinitesimal difference in drag between a CF frame and any other round tube frame is completely negated with one single gust of wind while you're sitting upright to round a corner.

    Tour de France times are coming down? Gee, maybe that has something to do with the average stage length getting shorter. That is what is known by big boys as "marketing".

    As for your idea that you don't have to be a racer yada yada - there's a large difference between putting it in a gear and it making any difference. 8 speeds were about all that was needed on a human powered bicycle. Armstrong wanted a 9th so that he could always have a climbing gear and whatever Lance did was magic. The component manufacturers were inundated with the demand for 9 speeds and they discovered that simply adding another gear would cause everyone to trash perfectly good components and buy an entirely new group.

    That doesn't mean that there haven't been perfectly good improvements. Skeleton brakes have a higher leverage and make easier application of the brakes. Compact cranks allow you to use only two speed rings without the complication and weight of a triple. Shimano pioneered the Compact front derailleur which is far less likely to drop a chain. Through shaft cranks are lighter and stiffer.

    But number of gears? What a joke.
    As NTT posted...old men yelling at clouds, what a joke.
    I work for some bike racers
    I've got some bikes, some guns,
    and a bunch of skateboards

  4. #79
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: PBL450's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Posts
    4,398
    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Kunich View Post
    Indeed your professor is correct. BUT if that finite life is longer than your own lifespan what difference does it make? Alan and Vitus aluminum bikes are all over the place and not failing. You can go to Trek and buy lower end aluminum framed road bikes with a lifetime warranty on them.

    Aluminum is a material that always has a stress to failure point. But it is entirely dependent upon the percentage of stress to material strength. Heavier tubes (relatively) last longer. Some aluminum alloys have such a high strength that the stress of a rider on a frame is so small that you can effectively say that they are not being stressed.

    What do you suppose the lifespan of a B52 is? They are made entirely of aluminum alloy and were initially brought into service in 1954. Although most of the fleet is moth-balled virtually every one of them is flyable.
    Well, except this one...

    https://www.usatoday.com/picture-gal...ut/3843288002/

    Granted a B-17.
    To date, philosophers have merely interpreted the world in various ways. The point however is to change it.

  5. #80
    'brifter' is a lame word.
    Reputation: cxwrench's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    14,804
    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Kunich View Post
    Indeed your professor is correct. BUT if that finite life is longer than your own lifespan what difference does it make? Alan and Vitus aluminum bikes are all over the place and not failing. You can go to Trek and buy lower end aluminum framed road bikes with a lifetime warranty on them.

    Aluminum is a material that always has a stress to failure point. But it is entirely dependent upon the percentage of stress to material strength. Heavier tubes (relatively) last longer. Some aluminum alloys have such a high strength that the stress of a rider on a frame is so small that you can effectively say that they are not being stressed.

    What do you suppose the lifespan of a B52 is? They are made entirely of aluminum alloy and were initially brought into service in 1954. Although most of the fleet is moth-balled virtually every one of them is flyable.
    There you go again...spouting w/ limited knowledge. The B-52 has undergone wing repairs/upgrades/reskins/replacements since the early 60's when they weren't even 10 years old. That's definitely 'finite'.
    I work for some bike racers
    I've got some bikes, some guns,
    and a bunch of skateboards

  6. #81
    tlg
    tlg is online now
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: tlg's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    15,462
    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Kunich View Post
    At what point are you going to learn what this string is about
    It ended up being about $13,000 bikes what with your continuing to change the subject.
    It's clearly about whatever bats#it crazy new thing you make up. You're the only one changing the subject every time you get busted on your BS.

    Oh, that's right - you have everything ever built on a bicycle you cannot tell us about. I keep forgetting these little points.
    Nope, never said that. Your wheels are spinning in your sad deflection.

    .Carbon fiber is more aero? Prove that it makes any difference at all since 90% of the drag on a bike is the rider.
    lmao there you go changing the premise. Carbon is more aero. Period. Fact. Undisputed.

    As far as difference, since you brought it up, there is a difference. Period. Fact. Undisputed

    The infinitesimal difference in drag between a CF frame and any other round tube frame is completely negated with one single gust of wind while you're sitting upright to round a corner.
    uhhhh. No. 10000% wrong. That gust of wind would affect both bikes. Net gain still goes to the aero bike.

    Tour de France times are coming down?
    I never said it was or wasn't. Stop yelling at clouds


    As for your idea that you don't have to be a racer yada yada - there's a large difference between putting it in a gear and it making any difference.
    there you go changing the premise again. You said you have to he a racer to use all the gears. Which is flat BS.
    Your concept of difference is irrelevant and silly


    Thanks for the laughs. But I think the clouds are tired.

  7. #82
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Posts
    908
    Maybe we can have "Roger" test his sprinting on a carbon versus Ti bicycle? That would be fitting.

  8. #83
    Banned Sock Puppet
    Reputation: Lombard's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    10,716
    ASFOS' troll threads were more fun.
    "If someone needs 200 rolls of toilet paper for a 14-day quarantine, they probably should have made a doctor's appointment way before the COVID-19 outbreak." -- Unknown

    "With
    bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."
    -- DCGriz, RBR.




  9. #84
    Schuylkill Trail Bum
    Reputation: SPlKE's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    4,863
    Quote Originally Posted by GKSki View Post
    Maybe we can have "Roger" test his sprinting on a carbon versus Ti bicycle? That would be fitting.
    If the frames pass the eXtremeRoger® tests, they'll be eligible to wear the coveted LBD Roger Tested - Roger Approved®

  10. #85
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Posts
    279
    Quote Originally Posted by No Time Toulouse View Post
    Well it certainly takes a great deal of intellectual capacity to add as much to the conversation as you have. PS - you didn't explain why B52's built no later than the early 1960's are still flying after your comments about aluminum always failing.

  11. #86
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Posts
    279
    Quote Originally Posted by cxwrench View Post
    It's obvious to me and everyone else that you don't know what you're talking about. I NEVER mentioned CX...that's my screen name. You asked me what I took in the car, I told you. I've NEVER run out of wheels. If that's the case I've never had a rider not finish a race because I didn't have a wheel for them. I've NEVER worked P-R so I don't worry about massive numbers of pinch flats/punctures. I can tell by how you talk about tubulars you're clueless.
    There has never been a race...any race...where over 180 riders flatted at the same time. If you think there has been the burden of proof is on you.
    I've worked for mens pro teams, womens pro teams, the US National Team, UCI ranked CX, Track, and Mtb riders. I've worked at multiple World Cups and National Championships in all disciplines. Yes, I know a little of what we're talking about.
    You? You're a guy that rides bikes and claims to have 'talked' to people.
    Funny, I could have sworn I just talked about the entire field getting flats in a stage of the Tour de France that covered the P-R course except for the front three finishers. That front three had been four and one of them got a flat. Again, you tell people they don't know what they're talking about simply because it is something beyond your experience. I tell you that we would carry pre-glued tires with us and you tell me I'm full of it. But Europeans do exactly the same thing on training rides. Your comments about a team of 6 shows that you maybe worked for a small semi-pro American team only in the US. All of that is fine but if you don't know what you're talking about do not tell us that you've glued on "hundreds" of tubulars. Plainly you haven't because simply removing a used tire would show you that the glue is still effective after you've pulled it off.

    https://www.bikeradar.com/advice/buy...-need-to-know/

    "The disadvantage of tubulars — one that’s felt much more keenly by regular cyclists than the pros — is that having a tyre that’s glued to the rim makes repairing a puncture during a ride very difficult.

    Your two options are using a CO2 inflator cartridge containing sealant or tearing off the punctured tubular and replacing it with another, which obviously means riding with a spare. (Actually repairing a punctured tubular, rather than simply replacing it, means breaking out the sewing kit.)

    You can — carefully — ride home on a spare tubular stretched over a rim, but you must glue this new tubular in place before your next ride. Gluing a tubular is no piece of cake either and a bad job can result in the tyre rolling off the rim and a painful crash."

    I suppose this guy gets the idea that the tire isn't really glued on because he never used "used" (already glued) tires as the spares. And if you could use tape what prevents you from carrying tape? I've never used that but if you're so knowledgeable about this why didn't you think of that rather than tell me that mechanic lied to me?

    There is something wrong with the group of you who had nothing but brainless chatter rather than any conversation at all. Is this the sort of life you guys live? You live to make yourselves feel superior simply by taking pot shots at others? Well. I guess like the rest of your lives, you failed yet again. When someone has done something you can't tell him he hasn't.

  12. #87
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Posts
    279
    Quote Originally Posted by GKSki View Post
    Maybe we can have "Roger" test his sprinting on a carbon versus Ti bicycle? That would be fitting.
    What do you think that would prove? UCI bikes all weigh the same and sprints are far too short for any aero advantage to have any effect. That would be like being concerned with rolling resistance of the tires - definitely makes a difference over the length of a stage but has no effect on the sprint.

  13. #88
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Posts
    279
    So you're back on the pastry board flat east coast telling us all about riding bicycles huh?

  14. #89
    tlg
    tlg is online now
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: tlg's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    15,462
    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Kunich View Post
    Funny, I could have sworn I just talked about the entire field getting flats in a stage of the Tour de France that covered the P-R course except for the front three finishers.
    No. That is not what you said. YET AGAIN, you make outlandish claims, get called on it, then change what you "think you said".

    Here is what you said
    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Kunich View Post
    There are areas in European races in which the entire Peloton will get flats all at once. We watched coverage of one of the lead riders get a flat three times over the length of a stage. In spring classis getting several flats is all part of the race.
    This is a bull$#it lie. This never happened. An entire peloton has never all got flats at once. Never. Not in the Tour de France. Not in "European races".
    Surely you could provide proof of this. It's so fantastical it's be all over the news, youtube, and every bicycle related site around the world.





    I tell you that we would carry pre-glued tires with us and you tell me I'm full of it. But Europeans do exactly the same thing on training rides.
    And... YET AGAIN, changing your story.

    Here is what you said
    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Kunich View Post
    A pro mechanic told me that the only reason that they use tubulars is because they can change a flat inside the team car on the move since they have limited roof rack room and you can watch the coverage of the Grand Tours and see them leaning out the windows and replacing the re-tired and refilled tire in the available wheel rack.
    This is a bull$#it lie. Pros do not do this. Ever.
    Surely you could provide proof of this with videos from the Grand Tours.
    Custom Di2 & Garmin/GoPro mounts 2013 SuperSix EVO Hi-MOD Team * 2004 Klein Aura V

  15. #90
    'brifter' is a lame word.
    Reputation: cxwrench's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    14,804
    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Kunich View Post
    Funny, I could have sworn I just talked about the entire field getting flats in a stage of the Tour de France that covered the P-R course except for the front three finishers. That front three had been four and one of them got a flat. Again, you tell people they don't know what they're talking about simply because it is something beyond your experience. I tell you that we would carry pre-glued tires with us and you tell me I'm full of it. But Europeans do exactly the same thing on training rides. Your comments about a team of 6 shows that you maybe worked for a small semi-pro American team only in the US. All of that is fine but if you don't know what you're talking about do not tell us that you've glued on "hundreds" of tubulars. Plainly you haven't because simply removing a used tire would show you that the glue is still effective after you've pulled it off.

    https://www.bikeradar.com/advice/buy...-need-to-know/

    "The disadvantage of tubulars — one that’s felt much more keenly by regular cyclists than the pros — is that having a tyre that’s glued to the rim makes repairing a puncture during a ride very difficult.

    Your two options are using a CO2 inflator cartridge containing sealant or tearing off the punctured tubular and replacing it with another, which obviously means riding with a spare. (Actually repairing a punctured tubular, rather than simply replacing it, means breaking out the sewing kit.)

    You can — carefully — ride home on a spare tubular stretched over a rim, but you must glue this new tubular in place before your next ride. Gluing a tubular is no piece of cake either and a bad job can result in the tyre rolling off the rim and a painful crash."

    I suppose this guy gets the idea that the tire isn't really glued on because he never used "used" (already glued) tires as the spares. And if you could use tape what prevents you from carrying tape? I've never used that but if you're so knowledgeable about this why didn't you think of that rather than tell me that mechanic lied to me?

    There is something wrong with the group of you who had nothing but brainless chatter rather than any conversation at all. Is this the sort of life you guys live? You live to make yourselves feel superior simply by taking pot shots at others? Well. I guess like the rest of your lives, you failed yet again. When someone has done something you can't tell him he hasn't.
    Again you're trying to change what you previously said. It's common practice to carry a pre-glued tire on a training ride, and ride home gently after flatting. NOT carrying a pre-glued tire in the team car and haphazardly putting it on a wheel that had flatted w/o any fresh glue.
    Your comment about me working for a small, semi-pro team reinforces your ignorance. The womens team I've spent the last 11 years with is a UCI World Tour team. They are limited to 6 riders in some races by the UCI, not because they can't field more riders. It's the team of 3 time Olympic Champion Kristin Armstrong and 8 time World Champion Chloe Dygert-Owen. Not to mention numerous other Nation Champions from USA, Cananda, Mexico.
    You have very limited experience w/ everything you post about and because of your massive insecurities can't imagine admitting you're wrong and learning something. Therefore you deny the knowledge and experience of numerous other posters as being legitimate. You live pretty close to me, why don't you come up and we'll chat about bikes in general and racing in particular? You might learn something if you'd allow yourself to do so.
    I work for some bike racers
    I've got some bikes, some guns,
    and a bunch of skateboards

  16. #91
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    638
    From the article you linked to support your claim that you can just stick a pre-glued (and dried) tubluar on a rim and ride it in a race:

    "You can — carefully — ride home on a spare tubular stretched over a rim, but you must glue this new tubular in place before your next ride. Gluing a tubular is no piece of cake either and a bad job can result in the tyre rolling off the rim and a painful crash."

    Go home Dad, you're drunk

  17. #92
    tlg
    tlg is online now
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: tlg's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    15,462
    Quote Originally Posted by 202cycle View Post
    From the article you linked to support your claim that you can just stick a pre-glued (and dried) tubluar on a rim and ride it in a race:

    "You can — carefully — ride home on a spare tubular stretched over a rim
    Meh.... what pro racer doesn't like to carefully ride to the finish line after their mechanic puts a pre-glued tire on in the back of a moving car. Happens all the time. Sometimes the entire peloton rides carefully after they all simultaneously flat at once.


    Hilarious when someone clueless provides their own evidence to further prove their cluelessness.
    Custom Di2 & Garmin/GoPro mounts 2013 SuperSix EVO Hi-MOD Team * 2004 Klein Aura V

  18. #93
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    638
    Quote Originally Posted by tlg View Post
    Meh.... what pro racer doesn't like to carefully ride to the finish line after their mechanic puts a pre-glued tire on in the back of a moving car. Happens all the time. Sometimes the entire peloton rides carefully after they all simultaneously flat at once.


    Hilarious when someone clueless provides their own evidence to further prove their cluelessness.
    Anxiously awaiting the next wall of text that will no doubt explain this all away.
    This is better than P.O.

  19. #94
    Banned Sock Puppet
    Reputation: Lombard's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    10,716
    Quote Originally Posted by 202cycle View Post
    Anxiously awaiting the next wall of text that will no doubt explain this all away.
    This is better than P.O.
    I still say ASFOS was more fun to play with.
    "If someone needs 200 rolls of toilet paper for a 14-day quarantine, they probably should have made a doctor's appointment way before the COVID-19 outbreak." -- Unknown

    "With
    bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."
    -- DCGriz, RBR.




  20. #95
    Schuylkill Trail Bum
    Reputation: SPlKE's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    4,863
    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Kunich View Post
    So you're back on the pastry board flat east coast telling us all about riding bicycles huh?
    I've ridden in the tallest areas of Berkshires in upstate NY and the Appalachians in western PA.

    Pastry board flat?

    Not even Roger, bike tester par excellence, would say something so goofy.

  21. #96
    Banned Sock Puppet
    Reputation: Lombard's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    10,716
    Quote Originally Posted by SPlKE View Post
    I've ridden in the tallest areas of Berkshires in upstate NY and the Appalachians in western PA.

    Pastry board flat?

    Not even Roger, bike tester par excellence, would say something so goofy.
    I'll be you didn't know that Mount Greylock is flat?
    "If someone needs 200 rolls of toilet paper for a 14-day quarantine, they probably should have made a doctor's appointment way before the COVID-19 outbreak." -- Unknown

    "With
    bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."
    -- DCGriz, RBR.




  22. #97
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    638
    Two things Tom.

    Please provide a link to the time the entire Tour peloton got flat tires at the same time. I googled that and came up short. I've watched every tour since 1986 and don't recall having seen this.

    Who is the pro mechanic who told you the tubular tire bologna and what team did he work for?

  23. #98
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Posts
    279
    Quote Originally Posted by cxwrench View Post
    There you go again...spouting w/ limited knowledge. The B-52 has undergone wing repairs/upgrades/reskins/replacements since the early 60's when they weren't even 10 years old. That's definitely 'finite'.
    I was Air Force in the Vietnam War including flying combat missions. The Framework of the B52 cannot be updated or changed and if you know anything about them you'd know that. The aircraft flexes in flight and so the wing panels become twisted and need replacement. THAT IS NOT UPDATING. Over the last 10 years the skin has been replaced with carbon fiber I believe since it doesn't stretch. Again, that is NOT the framework which would require total rebuild to replace.

    The B52D would get vertical stabilizer damage to the vertical stabilizer from aerodynamic forces and the tail was replaced with a shorter version. The aircraft who broke the tails off still maneuvered and returned to base.

    Now tell me what in the hell you know about the Air Force.

    Bomb/Nav Tech 32130L

  24. #99
    Schuylkill Trail Bum
    Reputation: SPlKE's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    4,863
    Next to janky threads about sketchy new pedals named after a hinky breed of dog, this thread is The Best Thread.

  25. #100
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    638
    Quote Originally Posted by SPlKE View Post
    Next to janky threads about sketchy new pedals named after a hinky breed of dog, this thread is The Best Thread.
    I need to go back and read the OP again.

    Hey Tom! Tom? How about that Tour link?

Page 4 of 11 FirstFirst ... 23456 ... LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Aluminum Frame Materials?
    By DRLski in forum Bikes, Frames and Forks
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 07-19-2008, 06:06 AM
  2. frame materials assistance! please?
    By celerystalksme in forum General Cycling Discussion
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: 11-20-2007, 03:40 PM
  3. Profit margins of various frame materials
    By Friction_Shifter in forum Bikes, Frames and Forks
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 03-05-2006, 01:36 AM
  4. What are the pros and cons of different frame/fork materials?
    By BATMAN in forum Bikes, Frames and Forks
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 08-23-2005, 09:42 PM
  5. Carbon frame materials
    By power1369 in forum Bikes, Frames and Forks
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 04-13-2005, 04:19 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT ROADBIKEREVIEW

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2020 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.