Frame too small? Too much seatpost?
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  1. #1
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    Frame too small? Too much seatpost?

    Got this frame on ebay. It is supposed to be a 57cm, but seems really small. In the picture below the bike feels good, but the post looks really high. There is enough post in the bike structurally, but would I be better off on a larger bike. I am 5'10.5 with long legs and a short thorso. Thanks.


  2. #2
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    That amount of exposed seat post looks pretty normal for a bike with compact geomentry.

  3. #3
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    I think that if you have a long enough TT and your bars are high enough all is good.

  4. #4
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    thoughts...

    That frame is certainly the smallest you could ride. You've got a lot of spacers under the stem and it looks like a 90 degree stem. As long as the bottom of the seatpost extends about 10mm below the bottom edge of the top tube and you're not above the max. height line, you've got enough seatpost length.

    I don't know how much saddle to bar drop you've got, but as long as you're comfortable, that's not a problem either. I'm a lot smaller and have an 11-12cm drop.

    For a guy with a short torso, your stem looks plenty long, you've got bars with a normal reach and the Shimano levers have more reach than any other brand. To keep a 110mm stem length, I need short reach bars and Campy ergo lever to minimize the reach.

    Next time you look for a frame, ignore the "frame size" number and concentrate on the head tube length, with the headset, the TT length and the seat tube angle. A steeper STA increases the reach by about 1cm per degree. You could use more head tube and seat tube length, but no more reach, unless you get shorter reach bars.

    Also be sure that you don't have the saddle too high. A good guideline is to have the foot horizontal at the bottom of the stroke, with the leg locked out. I've seen some people with the saddle jacked up as much as 4-5cm beyond that point, pedaling with an extreme toes down position. There's no advantage to that.

    Many years ago, I fell for that poor advice to keep raising the saddle until my hips rocked while pedaling, then lower it a bit. I don't have a record of the exact height, but I'm sure it was at least 2cm higher than what I use today.
    Last edited by C-40; 10-22-2008 at 05:59 AM.

  5. #5
    duh...
    Reputation: FatTireFred's Avatar
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    maybe it's the pic, but I'd check the min insertion mark on that post...

  6. #6
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    What bars are those?

  7. #7
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    short reach bars?

    Quote Originally Posted by C-40
    That frame is certainly the smallest you could ride. You've got a lot of spacers under the stem and it looks like a 90 degree stem. As long as the bottom of the seatpost extends about 10mm below the bottom edge of the top tube and you're not above the max. height line, you've got enough seatpost length.

    I don't know how much saddle to bar drop you've got, but as long as you're comfortable, that's not a problem either. I'm a lot smaller and have an 11-12cm drop.

    For a guy with a short torso, your stem looks plenty long, you've got bars with a normal reach and the Shimano levers have more reach than any other brand. To keep a 110mm stem length, I need short reach bars and Campy ergo lever to minimize the reach.

    Next time you look for a frame, ignore the "frame size" number and concentrate on the head tube length, with the headset, the TT length and the seat tube angle. A steeper STA increases the reach by about 1cm per degree. You could use more head tube and seat tube length, but no more reach, unless you get shorter reach bars.

    Also be sure that you don't have the saddle too high. A good guideline is to have the foot horizontal at the bottom of the stroke, with the leg locked out. I've seen some people with the saddle jacked up as much as 4-5cm beyond that point, pedaling with an extreme toes down position. There's no advantage to that.

    Many years ago, I fell for that poor advice to keep raising the saddle until my hips rocked while pedaling, then lower it a bit. I don't have a record of the exact height, but I'm sure it was at least 2cm higher than what I use today.

    C-40, what short reach bars do you use?

  8. #8
    rc2
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    Umm, you got the white garage door right, but the bike should be on the other side, chain rings out, chain in the big ring, and drive-side crank at 3 o'clock. ;) Other than that, assuming the post is inserted far eought (as others have said) and it fits comfortably, it looks fine.

  9. #9
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    I totally agree with C40. This is the same discussion we had on the Haza frame thread. I have a hard time believing that those bars (deep drop- longer reach) and that long stem make for a comfortable ride, as that reach is very long, especially for someone with longer legs. Look at the seat height as compared to the reach

    I have the same fit that are represented by this bike. I need a short reach, and I have difficulty finding a bike (that I can afford) the has a high enough head tube for the length of the top tube. Then, if I do, the STA is steep, making the Top Tube effectively to long.
    Even being careful with frame purchase, I've had to go to a 90 mm stem, maximum spacers and a compact bar, and I still have a significant drop. Luckily, bike manufacturers are finally realizing tthat a shorter reach is #1 a good thing overall. And #2 actually needed by a large portion of the population.

    Someday I'll go custom.

  10. #10
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    Thanks for all the information. I have a compact bar and 90mm stem to put on to shorten the reach. Reach is an issue I have always had. I never ride in the drops and almost always feel stretched out on the bike.

  11. #11
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    Easton...

    Quote Originally Posted by marc180
    C-40, what short reach bars do you use?
    I use the Easton EC90 SLX3 carbon. Not cheap, but Beyond bikes has them for $175.

  12. #12
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    The bike looks fine!

    However, it is extremely difficult to say whether the bike fits you correctly by looking at a naked picture of the bike. And, for someone to tell you what you should be doing to be fitted correctly on it by just looking at the above picture is living in a fantasy world where their only frame of reference is how it would measure up to them. Or how they would fit themselves on the bike.

    Forget what the spacer police say. Most forks can take 50mm of spacers. It doesn't look like you have exceeded that and, if you need to, you can always change the rise of your stem.

    There are more than a few theories on fit. You could read about them, experiment a bit and eventually come up with something that works for you. Although, I would suggest that you look for a shop in your area that is known to give customers a good fit and have them take care of you. During which, you should ask as many questions as you can about how they have come up with the fit. This will increase your knowledge and give you a frame of reference. From there you can make small changes that better suits your riding style.

  13. #13
    Off the back.
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    Nice frame, BTW.
    Looking for a certain ratio...
    Oh-oh, nothing there this time

  14. #14
    confirmed masher
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    seatpost is fine if your legs are long enough.. make sure there is bend in your knee at the bottom of the stroke.

    I'm more worried about your tt and torso/arm length... you say you're 5'10.5, with shorter arms... 57cm sounds sorta large to me. are your arms somewhat bent or full extended on the hoods? shorter stem might help if you are extended or feeling stretched. dont' worry about the spacers police. the whole set up looks pretty good for a big guy build.

    If it feels good and is structurally sound, you're good to roll.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by AlexCad5
    I have a hard time believing that those bars (deep drop- longer reach) and that long stem make for a comfortable ride, as that reach is very long, especially for someone with longer legs. Look at the seat height as compared to the reach
    There are lots of people riding with lots of saddle drop, deep drops and long reach bars and are comfortable. I have really long legs (91cm inseam) at only 1.83m and have put 20,000km+ on the following setup, the handlebars have 98mm of reach and thats a 120mm stem. It's a matter of fit and body adaptation.
    Last edited by function; 02-25-2009 at 12:29 PM.

  16. #16
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    Absolutely. As I have indicated it the past, no one can look at a bike a say whether it fits the rider or not. It is like looking at a size 7 or 12 shoe and saying that it doesn't look right and making suggestions as how to make it look like a 9.5. Sure it will look like a 9.5 afterwards but it won't fit a person who requires a size 7 or 12.

    BTW, nice ride!

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