Full Carbon Fork
Results 1 to 20 of 20
  1. #1
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Posts
    844

    Full Carbon Fork

    When a manufacturer states "full carbon fork" (specifically on a Bianchi Intenso road bike), what does that mean exactly? Are the dropouts themselves also CF?

    Seems I picked up a rock in the road or another bicycle or automobile threw one back and I seem to recall a ping noise like when a pebble on the road is thrown up hitting the CF downtube. Now a few days later I find my red paint is chipped down at the fork dropout area.

    What's puzzling is the 1/2" chip reveals some black material (assume to be CF) but also some shiny silver material that I could easily take to be alloy. So back to part of my original question. Are the dropouts alloy on a full carbon fork?

    This damage seems superficial, especially knowing that I have never crashed the frame, touched wheels, or had the bike fall over or anything. The damage had to have come from road debris, however I cannot get myself to get back in the saddle till I feel more secure about it.

  2. #2
    [REDACTED]
    Reputation: Lombard's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    9,510
    Dropouts are never carbon. They are always a metal. There would be too much possible user error in QR clamping force to use carbon dropouts.
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



  3. #3
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Posts
    844
    You'd think this might happen a lot as painted steel forks were always getting chipped from road debris when riding in the bunch. Confusion on my part when I see black and also "silver" alloy revealed under the chip.

    Attached Images Attached Images

  4. #4
    'brifter' is a lame word.
    Reputation: cxwrench's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    14,192
    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    Dropouts are never carbon. They are always a metal. There would be too much possible user error in QR clamping force to use carbon dropouts.
    What?!? Where you been for the last decade or more? There are carbon dropouts everywhere these days, both frame and fork.
    I work for some bike racers
    I've got some bikes, some guns,
    and a bunch of skateboards

  5. #5
    [REDACTED]
    Reputation: Lombard's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    9,510
    Quote Originally Posted by cxwrench View Post
    What?!? Where you been for the last decade or more? There are carbon dropouts everywhere these days, both frame and fork.
    Well then, I stand corrected! Though it doesn't sound like a great idea to have carbon in a place that is frequently clamped on by people who don't know their own hand strength. But what do I know? I also haven't heard too many stories of failing at the dropouts.

    My 2007 Trek definitely has metal dropouts. I can't really tell what my 2014 Synapse or 2017 Jamis Renegade (steel frame/carbon fork) have as they are painted, but it looks like carbon. I surrender, you win!
    Last edited by Lombard; 2 Weeks Ago at 07:58 AM.
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



  6. #6
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Posts
    844
    So, according to the Bianchi specs, I have a full carbon fork but have to wonder about the silver metallic looking material that the chip partially revealed.

    I will say it again, in the steel frame days forks and downtube undersides always got chipped, etc. from road debris thrown from the front wheel or riders in front of you. Those injuries simply involved touch up paint and it seemed like it was often the underside of the downtube, rear side of the seattube and rear side of the fork. How do these injuries translate to today's CF frame?

    Hope to have my LBS look it over tomorrow and further hoping it is just a chip I can repair with touch up paint. I know I have never laid the bike down, had it fall over, touched wheels, etc., so it has to be from a rock I picked up and I feel like I remember the "clack" from a few rides ago.

  7. #7
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2017
    Posts
    573
    I'm pretty sure that "Full Carbon" is probably just referring to the fact that the fork blades and steerer are carbon (as opposed to the dreadful alloy steerer bonded to a carbon fork crown).

  8. #8
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Posts
    844
    This image shows the dropout faces to look to clearly be alloy. So does the chip (1/4") look compromising?

    Attached Images Attached Images

  9. #9
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Posts
    844
    Actually, when I zoom in on the photo, the black doesn't look like CF after all, rather it looks like black primer over the alloy.

  10. #10
    'brifter' is a lame word.
    Reputation: cxwrench's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    14,192
    Quote Originally Posted by GKSki View Post
    This image shows the dropout faces to look to clearly be alloy. So does the chip (1/4") look compromising?

    Nope.
    I work for some bike racers
    I've got some bikes, some guns,
    and a bunch of skateboards

  11. #11
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Posts
    844
    Thanks, CX, but not sure what the "Nope" was referencing? It could mean good or bad. I am hoping you meant Nope, not compromising. Do you see these kind of injuries very often? Seems like you would especially with a gravel bike.

    Do the indentations in the photo where the quick release has been grabbing indicate that the dropout tab is soft alloy?

  12. #12
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Posts
    3,106
    That picture, to me, looks like the fork is hollow! OMG!

    Must be an optical illusion on my retna. I think everyone here is say'in you are good to go. Looks ok to me. I don't think fork dropouts are 'soft', maybe not hardened steel, but not soft.
    Alloy refers to metals of multiple types of composition, usually added to make it stronger or tougher.
    BANNED

  13. #13
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Posts
    844
    No, that black has to be a primer as it seems some of the black flaked off the alloy showing in the photo. This frame really had a good paint job. I've heard many a piece of road debris clip the bottom of the down tube and yet the finish is still perfect gloss.

    As for the quick release impression in the dropout partial circle, yes I understand that is alloy and not hardened steel, but the force to create those marks in alloy would surely cause CF to splinter or debraid.

    Just got unlucky on what was thrown back hitting the rear end of the fork dropout.

  14. #14
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2017
    Posts
    573
    Looks like a paint chip to me.
    Last edited by Finx; 1 Week Ago at 07:47 AM.

  15. #15
    'brifter' is a lame word.
    Reputation: cxwrench's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    14,192
    Quote Originally Posted by GKSki View Post
    Thanks, CX, but not sure what the "Nope" was referencing? It could mean good or bad. I am hoping you meant Nope, not compromising. Do you see these kind of injuries very often? Seems like you would especially with a gravel bike.

    Do the indentations in the photo where the quick release has been grabbing indicate that the dropout tab is soft alloy?
    I would have thought that bolding part of your quote would make it clear what I was replying to. No...I do not think the damage will be a problem.
    I work for some bike racers
    I've got some bikes, some guns,
    and a bunch of skateboards

  16. #16
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Posts
    844
    One last thought. Is it appropriate and/or common to describe a fork as "full carbon" if in fact the dropouts are alloy?

  17. #17
    'brifter' is a lame word.
    Reputation: cxwrench's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    14,192
    Quote Originally Posted by GKSki View Post
    One last thought. Is it appropriate and/or common to describe a fork as "full carbon" if in fact the dropouts are alloy?
    Yes. 'Full' carbon has historically meant steerer & legs.
    I work for some bike racers
    I've got some bikes, some guns,
    and a bunch of skateboards

  18. #18
    tlg
    tlg is offline
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: tlg's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    14,285
    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    Well then, I stand corrected! Though it doesn't sound like a great idea to have carbon in a place that is frequently clamped on by people who don't know their own hand strength. But what do I know? I also haven't heard too many stories of failing at the dropouts.
    The dropouts are solid carbon. Which is INCREDIBLY strong in compression. Clamping carbon is an issue with hollow thin wall structures. No one would have the hand strength to damage it with a mere QR.

    Given that they've been making CF dropouts for years and you've been unaware, haven't heard stories of them failing (nor have I), shows they are a good idea. I'd argue they're stronger than alum dropouts since bonding carbon to carbon is better than carbon to alum.
    Custom Di2 & Garmin/GoPro mounts 2013 SuperSix EVO Hi-MOD Team * 2004 Klein Aura V

  19. #19
    [REDACTED]
    Reputation: Lombard's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    9,510
    Quote Originally Posted by tlg View Post
    Given that they've been making CF dropouts for years and you've been unaware, haven't heard stories of them failing (nor have I), shows they are a good idea. I'd argue they're stronger than alum dropouts since bonding carbon to carbon is better than carbon to alum.
    OK, this makes sense.
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



  20. #20
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Posts
    844
    No. My "full carbon fork" does indeed have alloy dropouts. Confirmed by vendor.

Similar Threads

  1. Full carbon bike or Aluminum with carbon fork
    By andy11 in forum Beginner's Corner
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 08-29-2009, 10:04 AM
  2. Replies: 11
    Last Post: 07-30-2006, 01:55 PM
  3. Replies: 1
    Last Post: 07-16-2006, 10:38 AM
  4. upgrade to a full carbon or carbon fork only
    By max29 in forum Bikes, Frames and Forks
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 08-15-2005, 10:07 AM
  5. upgrade to a full carbon or carbon fork only
    By max29 in forum Bikes, Frames and Forks
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 08-15-2005, 01:29 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT ROADBIKEREVIEW

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2019 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.