Lynskey R330: Crit bike?
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  1. #1
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    Lynskey R330: Crit bike?

    I'm a 41 year-old ex-racer (cat 3) and 6'0" 175#. For my size, I probably crank out more power than the average cat 3 of my proportions, though that power comes as a rouleur, not a sprinter. I haven't raced in 5 years, but am going to jump back into masters races next year -- mostly crits.

    I have a Scandium Merckx Team SC that is by far the best bike I've owned (and I've owned probably a dozen road bikes). It is stiff in all the right places, yielding responsiveness and handling that is very sharp, while remaining comfortable enough to be ridden for hours at a time...with the right tires and air pressure. Despite the low bottom bracket, it was great in crits. I've raced and ridden it for 7 years now, but I know eventually it will need to be replaced. In fact, it's already got a few gouges on the frame that may hasten its demise.

    I see that Lynskey has their mid-range R330 on sale for a great price. I'm considering buying one because I like the durability ot ti. But I have doubts about stiffness and resulting handling characteristics in crits. I have of course used the search function here and have seen rave reviews of the R330. Most people say it is a stiff frame, unlike most titanium frames that are probably best left off the race course. I recently sold a Merckx Millenium 3 titanium that in my view was stiffer than most ti road bikes, but not quite stiff enough for crits.

    So for those of you who have ridden or own a Lynskey R330: Would you race it in a crit? If you've raced aluminum bikes too, what's the comparison? Anything else I should think about?

    Thanks!
    Last edited by Wines of WA; 08-10-2009 at 02:04 PM.

  2. #2
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    I have a new R330 and have raced it in a couple crits this year. It performed very well. I felt solid and nimble at the same time. I went from an aluminum to Ti and couldn't be more pleased. Make the move and make it a Lynskey.

  3. #3
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    Good to hear the confirmation, since I already have my R330 on order!

    Seth, just curious: How much do you weigh and what category do you race?

  4. #4
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    I'm just a hair under six feet tall and weigh around 175 lbs. I am a tri guy mostly. When I race my Lynskey though, I'm a CAT 5. I just started road racing this year. I've done some mountain century rides on the R330 and have been impressed. It decends well and I have been able to finish these rides still very comfortable.

  5. #5
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    Those are precisely my dimensions as well. I was a Cat 3 until 5 years ago, but stopped racing. I'm going to pick up racing again next year. Thanks for your input Seth.

  6. #6
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    I just got my R330 built with 6700 Ultegra and the bike is very solid. The build is around 17.82lbs and not the lightest in the world. You can spend much more to make it light but I think it is a very good all purpose bike.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wines of WA
    I'm a 41 year-old ex-racer (cat 3) and 6'0" 175#. For my size, I probably crank out more power than the average cat 3 of my proportions, though that power comes as a rouleur, not a sprinter. I haven't raced in 5 years, but am going to jump back into masters races next year -- mostly crits.

    I have a Scandium Merckx Team SC that is by far the best bike I've owned (and I've owned probably a dozen road bikes). It is stiff in all the right places, yielding responsiveness and handling that is very sharp, while remaining comfortable enough to be ridden for hours at a time...with the right tires and air pressure. Despite the low bottom bracket, it was great in crits. I've raced and ridden it for 7 years now, but I know eventually it will need to be replaced. In fact, it's already got a few gouges on the frame that may hasten its demise.

    I see that Lynskey has their mid-range R330 on sale for a great price. I'm considering buying one because I like the durability ot ti. But I have doubts about stiffness and resulting handling characteristics in crits. I have of course used the search function here and have seen rave reviews of the R330. Most people say it is a stiff frame, unlike most titanium frames that are probably best left off the race course. I recently sold a Merckx Millenium 3 titanium that in my view was stiffer than most ti road bikes, but not quite stiff enough for crits.

    So for those of you who have ridden or own a Lynskey R330: Would you race it in a crit? If you've raced aluminum bikes too, what's the comparison? Anything else I should think about?

    Thanks!
    Buy the Lynsky. I love mine. It is a work of art and loves to race and climb.

  8. #8
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    I did a 60km ride with my Lynskey today and I am going to ride my Cervelo RS to have a better comparison. The R330 is pretty darn stiff on the BB and the ride is very firm. My GIOS Compact Pro is a bit softer ride than my R330 and not a good climber at all. I can say the RS is my favorite because it dose everything well but the R330 is super smooth on the flats. I believe the R330 would be a good crit bike too because the handling characteristic is like a Porsche. I tested today on two of my favorite turns one at 49KPH and another at 65KPH. The bike is solid on the ground and very controllerable without fear.

  9. #9
    So what if I'm a dork!
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    Those Lynskey R330 are sweet but too much $$ for me right now. I've been considering picking up a Gios lately. Why do you say the Gios Compact is not a good climber? I raced a buch of crits myself and thought the alum worked best. No time to think about comfort .
    Henry Porter
    ...But the pistol thing is dumb.

  10. #10
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    GIOS Compact is not a alum frame it is a steel frame. The bike flex on the BB a bit and you lost a bit of acceleration.

  11. #11
    So what if I'm a dork!
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    Quote Originally Posted by shaochieh
    GIOS Compact is not a alum frame it is a steel frame. The bike flex on the BB a bit and you lost a bit of acceleration.
    Yes I know the Gios is steel. I was just wondering why you said it wasn't a good climber. I don't plan on racing anymore but I've read that the Compact Pro would be a responsive bike yet I know a little heavy. If I do race I will probably just do some trainng crits on a course about 5 miles from my house they do on Tuesdays. I would not buy an alum frame these days unless I raced more than I trained. So you think the Gios is a little "noodley" for crits?
    Henry Porter
    ...But the pistol thing is dumb.

  12. #12
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    I never raced but I believe you can race on anything you want but I don't think the Gios would be a good fit. I don't ride my not very often and it dose not have good response to my command compare to my other bikes. I have five bikes and I switch up very often. So far the RS comes first than the Lynskey. Both the Lynskey and GIOS are sort of twitchy. My Trek 5.2sl and 5200 are not because the frame is a bit bigger 56cm. GIOS is a 53 because the shop don't have anymore my size here in Germany and I made it fit with longer stem.

  13. #13
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    I ride a Lynskey R320 and it is extremely stable -- not at all twitchy. Do you have the recommended Alpha Q fork?

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by onlineflyer
    I ride a Lynskey R320 and it is extremely stable -- not at all twitchy. Do you have the recommended Alpha Q fork?
    Yes, I got the Alpha Q GS-10 that came with the frame. BTW, that same deal I got from over the summer of $1,995 for frame + fork is back on.

  15. #15
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    Yes, the Alpha Q works well with the frame. I've reached top speeds of over 55mph descending and no problems - with corners.

  16. #16
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    Wines of WA,

    Have you built it up yet? And if so, how is the stiffness that you were asking about in the OP? Has it been able to handle your weight and power. I am roughly your same build and I am looking into this frameset also.

  17. #17
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    I'm not the guy that originally posted. I'm the second guy that already had a R330 and have been riding it for the whole summer. I can tell you that it is rigid. Best road bike I've owned and ridden.

  18. #18
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    I haven't built it up yet; still gathering parts.

  19. #19
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    Anyone have any experience comparing the R320 to the R230? Ride characteristics, best uses for each?

    Thanks

  20. #20
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    I own a R320 and my daughter has a R230 so I've ridden both. The R320 is slightly stiffer and a bit lighter. The R230 is slightly more compliant. Both are great bikes. Either one is a great choice. Having said that, I prefer the R320. Then again, I'm 40 pounds heavier than my daughter and I prefer the increased stiffness.

  21. #21
    Juanmoretime
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    Good choice on the R330. I've been on the R320 for almost 2 years. Best bike I have owned to date! Also 6" although 160 lbs but plenty stiff.
    For my next trick I will now set myself on fire!

  22. #22
    cmg
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    somebody post a photo.

  23. #23
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    New poster here......Just getting back into road bikes this year after about a 10 year hiatus....

    I just got my Lynskey R330 on Friday and over the weekend put about 70 miles on it. (I'm coming off an old Cannondale 2.8 frame built with Campy 1st generation C-record - yes friction down tube shifting.)

    I don't race anymore but like to go fast. I love 40-60 mile rides at 20+ mph averages.

    To say that I prefer stiff should go as an understatement. I've ridden AL (C'dale and a whippy Vitus 979 back in the day)...various steel bikes including a Gianna Motta that I eventually broke. I got my new Lynskey because the left side C-record crankarm on my Cannondale snapped and I was wondering what would break next. My wife actually pushed me to buy a new bike and after a bit of research decided that the ride characteristics and durability of Ti was what I was looking for.

    I couldnt be happier with my decision. The Lynskey is stiff without the harshness of my old Cannondale. The R330 actually reminds me of riding my 2.8 with soft tires. It doesn't deflect at all at the BB, the rear end feels rock solid, but the road surface is muted when compared to other stiff frames I've ridden. It's stable at speed descending, is stable with no hands and responds to every push of the pedals whether pushing a big gear hard on the flats or standing out of the saddle climbing.

    The workmanship (welds) are immaculate and beautiful. I got the deal of the Summer with the brushed Houseblend frame, Alpha Q GS-10 fork and a Rival build. It's not the lightest bike in the world at 17.2 pounds with my ancient Time racing pedals and 2 American Classic alloy cages, but the ride and overall feel is way more important to me than what the scale says. And those helix seat stays.........sexy as hell.

    (By the way, I'm 5'8,155)

    And OMG, the Rival drivetrain ........I was worried I'd miss the downtube shifters and Campy Record brakes.......WTF was I thinking??? Effortless shifting at the tip of my finger...am I gushing????

    Pics.....







    I'm looking forward to miles and miles and years of fun on this machine.

    BTW - anyone near FT Campbell KY?

    Dave

  24. #24
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    Hi, Armybikerider,
    Just wondering what size frame and stem your bike is

  25. #25
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    The frame is a Lynskey Medium and the stem is 100mm.

    Dave

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