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  1. #1
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    is a Motobecane Le Champion Ti good?

    Anyone own a Motobecane Le Champion TI bike? This bike looks like a great bike at a great price. I am looking at carbon bikes but maybe a TI one is better.

    Any thoughts?

  2. #2
    mrwirey
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    "Anything can be a torch if you set it on fire"

  3. #3
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    I have yet to read comments by anyone who has one who did not love it, except for the seat post.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by mrwirey View Post
    Interesting review. Cant decide between this or a carbon Trek Emonda, which is now on my short list.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by yogie464 View Post
    Anyone own a Motobecane Le Champion TI bike? This bike looks like a great bike at a great price. I am looking at carbon bikes but maybe a TI one is better.

    Any thoughts?
    I'm very frugal but not with bikes. I'd be more comfortable with Moots or Seven. Buy right and you'll have a bike for years. Buy cheap and you'll likely be upgrading much sooner.

  6. #6
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    Go Emonda

  7. #7
    CX'er
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    While I don't consider the bikedirect bike to be complete garbage, I don't think they're the best either. My experience with a motobecane ti bike was that it was very flexy and harder to control in sprints than the carbon bike that eventually replaced it (after buckling the frame in a crash). I'm far from tiny at 220 lbs and I'm built like a linebacker and can put down the watts for short durations.

    Even though I destroyed the frame, I used the components for several years after that so realistically I wasn't out a ton of money from the buy since their bikes are so cheap, it's like buying a build kit and a free frame comes with it.

    For the price, they're decent. Nothing magical but far better than a walmart bike and still better than the entry level road bikes from big names.

    I would go with the emonda if the budget allows and you can get a test ride and it rides well for you.

  8. #8
    Cycling 4 the fun of it.
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    Can't say the I've ever ridden a titanium bike before. I will say, I have owned plenty of BD bikes before. I've always found them to be reliable and of good quality.

  9. #9
    User is infamous around
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    Quote Originally Posted by yogie464 View Post
    Anyone own a Motobecane Le Champion TI bike? This bike looks like a great bike at a great price. I am looking at carbon bikes but maybe a TI one is better.

    Any thoughts?
    Depends on what you're using the bike for. If you're JRA, and enjoying the day, getting exercise, and participating in group rides and such, it's (and most of the other upper middle/upper level bikes) a decent deal. If you want to do serious racing and such, you'll be better off with the Trek.

    The biggest advantage of BD's stuff is the lower cost that comes from their factory to public sales, but remember that you get 0 after sales support other than manufacturing defect warranty. Their sales staff is helpful and will try to answer questions and concerns even after the sale, but that's a far cry from true LBS support. I have one of their MTB that I bought from them a couple years back, and had an issue with the FSA crankset. While they had no responsibility for fixing the problem (it wasn't built or made wrong, just bad luck on my part), BD helped me to get the issue resolved in a professional manner, but had I bought the bike from the LBS, they would have fixed the issue on their own dime. That's the downside of BikesDirect, if you need wrenching support after the sale, it's all out of your pocket and they don't HAVE TO help you (even though they can and do).

    You should also reexamine what you want from the frame, since titanium and carbon have very different qualities (yes any material can give any kind of ride, but you have to choose specific frames to get that kind of comparison). Carbon is gonna be a stiffer ride than Ti, but Ti will be more forgiving ride and the Motobecane in particular will allow a larger tire to be used (up to 35mm, IIRC) where as the Trek will limit you to 25-28mm.

    Should you want to sell it a couple years from now, ti will be easier to sell. Informed buyers know that used carbon frames can be a ticking timebomb if the previous owner abused the frame. Both are good bikes, it just depends on what you want, what you want to do, and what options you want to have down the road.
    Quote Originally Posted by chudak View Post
    It's made with a mixture of titanium, unobtanium and the freshly harvested dew from the sweaty brows of 16 YO suburban virgins.
    Quote Originally Posted by Opus51569 View Post
    Don't forget the ground up unicorn horn. That makes it magical.

  10. #10
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    I currently own a BD le champion TI. I am 5'9 170. I got the 53cm 2013 ultegra 10spd. I find it to be a really good bike. I have had zero issues with it. Its rides nice, I do lots of group rides and mainly use it for training. I don't find it flexy at all. Its very comfortable and rides well. The seatpost clamp that comes with the bike sucks, I replaced that and have had zero issues. For the price they are hard to beat. I also own a Felt AR2, carbon. The Felt is a completely different bike. I race on the felt and find myself spending more time on it than the Ti. I am probably going to sell the Ti not that there is anything wrong with it but I find myself on the Felt a lot more. I personally would not own a Trek, I had all kinds of problems with mine. Not that they are bad bikes but not for me.
    I think If you got the Ti you will love it..

  11. #11
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    Sorry to revive an old thread....but....

    I bought the 2018 version of this bike for the drivetrain to put on another older frame i had

    at the time, i had the intentions of turning this into a gravel bike...but I did not pay close enough attention to the specs

    it does not appear that much more than a 25c tire with only modest tread could fit - or am I wrong

    is there a way to spec out this frame fork (it is not disc ready) as a gravel bike? - if so, how would you spec it out?

    thanks!

  12. #12
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    You need to look at the axle to crown measurement of the fork. Cross forks are a bit higher for more tire clearance, Clarence. But putting a cx fork on a road frame will raise the front end and change the handling/geometry somewhat. And the real limiting factor may be on the back with how much clearance you have with the chain stays.

  13. #13
    Adorable Furry Hombre
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    Quote Originally Posted by edlebby View Post
    Sorry to revive an old thread....but....

    I bought the 2018 version of this bike for the drivetrain to put on another older frame i had

    at the time, i had the intentions of turning this into a gravel bike...but I did not pay close enough attention to the specs

    it does not appear that much more than a 25c tire with only modest tread could fit - or am I wrong

    is there a way to spec out this frame fork (it is not disc ready) as a gravel bike? - if so, how would you spec it out?

    thanks!

    Get the right frame/fork for the purpose.

    25mm is only adequate for very dry and hardpacked surfaces.
    "Refreshingly Unconcerned With The Vulgar Exigencies Of Veracity "

  14. #14
    'brifter' is a lame word.
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    A member for 14 years and a first post? That's a lot of lurking
    I work for some bike racers
    I've got some bikes, some guns,
    and a bunch of skateboards

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by cxwrench View Post
    A member for 14 years and a first post? That's a lot of lurking
    LOL I'm a slow learner there's a lot of content here and I've just been taking it all in

    But now I have outed myself

    As per the earlier email that's exactly my fear is that I bought a frame that truly needs to be dedicated as a road frame and does not have the clearance at the rear... The new Fork would not be the end of the world but there's no way to change the size of the rear

    I guess it's on to plan B which will be to sell the frame and fork and then find a fit for purpose gravel setup

    Thanks I'll Retreat to the Shadows now

  16. #16
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    You can solve the fork issue with something like the Whisky No 9 Road+. I have one, and it rides incredibly well, uses long reach road brakes, and has a lot of tire clearance (35+). It's expensive though, and doesn't really solve your problem. A tubeless 25 out back is probably fine for a lot of the gravel riding out there, but it won't be all that comfy. I can just fit a 28mm Specialized Turbo (really about 29mm wide in my case) in my max-25mm road frame, so it might be worth experimenting a bit. Measure clearances around the tire/frame/brake to see what sort of room you're working with.

    Or just sell the frame and buy something that'll do what you want... but that's probably too easy and inexpensive. I tend do it the harder and more expensive way.

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